(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan District Commission"

rrON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06544 658 3 






" TflBSaKai ii jay* 

•- ', . ■ . .' v- • 



:-ji*r 



.-._■* 







HE -V-' ■■:'='" 3BG H '■' ■■'■ -- • ■ 



rfiBfe 



■ 1 



ii 



<y 



r 



i 



1 



r€ 



^ 



<V« .....iv li 



Bl 







Given By 






^ 












Boston Public Library ' 

T>o not write In this book or mark it with pen or 
pencil. Penalties for so doing ' are imposed by the 
Revised Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 


This book was issued to the borrower on the date 
last stamped below. 








i - ^ • -^ 






1 * 






- <**j 


v<* 




i ■■&■■ — - ■ 


• 




JAN 3 <(£ 






m jam 4 




















• 












































• 



B P L. FORM NO. 609: 10.2e.32: teoM. 



Public Document 



No. 48 



€fje Commontoealtf) of $la&$attyu$ttt$ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Metropolitan District Commission 



For the Year 1926 




Publication or this Document Approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 



1M. 4-'27. Order 8572. 



Mass. Secretary of the Cowmoiiwealth 

3, /?JL? t 



/ 



CONTENTS 



I. Organization and Administration 

Commission, Officers and Employees 
II. General Financial Statement 

III. Construction 

IV. Rainfall and Consumption of Water 
V. Special Investigations . 

VI. Other Reports .... 
Report of the Director of Parks 
Report of the Director and Chief Engineer of Park Engineering 

Parkways 

Reservations .... 
Bridges and Locks . 

General 

Data relating to Metropolitan Park System 
Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Water Division 

Organization 

Metropolitan Water District and Works 

Construction . ' 

Pumping Equipment, Northern High Service . 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains 

Future Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains on River Street and Western 

Avenue Bridges 

Northern High Service Pipe Lines .... 
Southern High Service Pipe Lines .... 
Improvement of Service in Belmont and Watertown 
Meters and Connections . .... 

Improving Wachusett Watershed .... 

Extensions of the Works 

Maintenance 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 

Storage Reservoirs 

Wachusett Reservoir 

Sudbury Reservoir and Framingham Reservoir No. 3 
Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and 

Whitehall Reservoirs and Farm Pond 
Lake Cochituate 
Aqueducts .... 
Protection of Water Supply . 
Clinton Sewerage Works 

Forestry 

Hydroelectric Service . 
Distribution Pumping Stations 
Distribution Reservoirs 
Distribution Pipe Lines 
Consumption of Water 

Water from Metropolitan Water Works Sources used outside of the 
Metropolitan Water District 
Report of Director and Chief Engineer 
Organization .... 
Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 

Areas and Populations . 
Metropolitan Sewers 
Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections 

Construction 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer — Arlington 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer — Section 78 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer — Section 79 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer — Section 80 



of Sewerage Division 



1 
1 

1 

1 

2 

3 

3 

3 

7 

8 

10 

11 

12 

13 

16 

16 

17 

17 

17 

17 

17 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
19 
19 
19 
20 
20 

20 
21 
21 
22 
22 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
29 

30 
31 
31 
31 
31 
32 
32 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 



11 



P. D. 



Belmont Relief Sewer 
Belmont Relief Sewer — Section 81 
Maiden, Revere and Everett Drainage System 
Maintenance . . 
Scope of Work and Force employed 
East Boston Pumping Station 
Belle Isle Inlet 

Ward Street Pumping Station 
Quincy Pumping Station 
Nut Island Screen-house 
Gasolene in Public Sewers . 
Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewage to 
Metropolitan Sewerage System 
North Metropolitan System . 
South Metropolitan System . 
Whole Metropolitan System . 
Pumping Stations .... 
Capacities and Results 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System . 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls . 
Material intercepted at the Screens 

Financial Statement 

Parks Division 

Sewerage Division .... 

Water Division 

Appendix No. 1. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Parks Division 

made and pending during the year 1926 
Appendix No. 2. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works 

made and pending during the year 1926 
Appendix No. 3. — Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metro 

politan Water Works 

Table No. 1. — Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1926 . . 
Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1926 
Table No. 3. — Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water 

Storage and Rainfall in 1926 

Table No. 4. — Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water 

Storage and Rainfall in 1926 
Table No. 5. — Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water 

Storage and Rainfall in 1926 
Table No. 6. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water 



48 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
38 
38 
38 
38 
38 

39 
39 
40 
41 
42 
42 
42 
43 
44 
44 
45 
45 
59 
63 

70 

72 

77 

77 
78 

80 

81 
82 



has been drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan 

Water District 83 

Table No. 7. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through 

Aqueducts in 1926 by Months 84 

Table No. 8. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by 

Districts in Cities and Towns supplied by the Metro- 
politan Water Works in 1926 . .85 
Table No. 9. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of W r ater 

in Cities and Towns supplied by Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1926 86 

Table No. 10. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett 

Reservoir, Clinton 89 

Table No. 11. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury 

. Reservoir 

Table No. 12. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, 

Stoneham 

Table No. 13. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochit- 

mite . . . . . . . . . . <_'-L 



90 



90 



P. D. 48 Hi 

Table No. 14. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the 

State House, Boston 91 

Table No. 15. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in 

Boston, 1898-1926 . 92 

Table No. 16. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water 

from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 
Works, 1898-1926 . 92 

Table No. 17. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metro- 
politan Water Works in 1926 ..... 93 

Table No. 18. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1926 ... 94 

Table No. 19. — Length of Metropolitan W T ater Works Main Lines and 

Connections and Number of Valves set in Same, 
December 31, 1926 95 

Table No. 20. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Hydrant, 

Blow-off and Drain Pipes, December 31, 1926 . . 95 

Table No. 21. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and 

Connections and Water Pipes Four Inches in 
Diameter and Larger in the Several Cities and 
Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, 
December 31, 1926 . 96 

Table No. 22. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Ser- 
vices metered, Fire Services and Fire Hydrants in 
the Several Cities and Towns in the Metropolitan 
Water District December 31, 1926 . . . .97 

Table No. 23. — Elevation of the Hydraulic Grade Line in Feet above 

Boston City Base for Each Month at Stations on the 
Metropolitan Water Works during 1926 ... 98 
Appendix No. 4. — Contracts made and Pending during the year 1926 — 

Sewerage Division 100 



REPORT OF THE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT 

COMMISSION 

To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts in General Court assembled 
The Metropolitan District Commissioner has already presented to your Honor- 
able Body an abstract of the account of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements 
and liabilities of the Metropolitan District Commission for the fiscal year ending 
on November 30, 1926, and now, in accordance with the provisions of section 100 
of chapter 92 of the General Laws, presents a detailed statement of its doings for 
the calendar year ending on December 31, 1926. 

SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 
Commission, Officers and Employees 

The term of office of Frank A. Bayrd expired on November 30, 1926, and he 
was reappointed for the term of five years next succeeding. The membership of 
the Commission has consequently remained as in the preceding year: Davis B. 
Keniston, Commissioner; Frank A. Bayrd, Frank G. Hall, William H. Squire and 
George B. Wason, Associate Commissioners. Frank G. Hall is Director of Parks, 
John R. Rablin, Director of Park Engineering, William E. Foss, Director of the 
Water Division and Frederick D. Smith, Director of the Sewerage Division. 

George Lyman Rogers has continued as secretary and the following as chief 
engineers: of parks, John R. Rablin; of water, William E. Foss; of sewerage, Fred- 
erick D. Smith. 

The maximum number of employees during the year was 1,631, divided as 
follows: general offices, 24; parks, 991; water, 399; sewerage, 217. 

In this tabulation of employees the police are included under parks, although 
they give considerable protection to portions of the water system. 



• • 



II. GENERAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Year ending November SO, 1926 
Expenditure for construction . 
Expenditures, miscellaneous . 
Expenditure for maintenance . 
Total expenditure 
Unexpended balance, maintenance 
Serial bonds issued . 
Serial bonds paid 
Loan notes issued 
Loan notes paid 
Increase in sinking funds 
Decrease in net debt 



appropriations 



$3,420,790.20 

313,792.51 

3,260,259.83 

6,994,842.54 

1,050,300.53 

337,500.00 

362,187.50 

200,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

2,255,003.33 

3,079,690.83 



Net debt 



On November SO, 1926 



$40,037,090.99 



III. CONSTRUCTION 

The second and third sections of the Mill Brook Valley Sewer in Arlington and 
Medford were completed during the year and work upon the fourth and last section 
was started in August. The first three sections have been connected with the 
Arlington sewer and are now diverting a substantial amount of sewage, appreciably 
decreasing the pumping at the Alewife Brook sewerage pumping station. 

Work was started July 12, 1926, upon the Maiden, Revere and Everett drainage 
channel authorized by Chapter 456 of the Acts of 1924. A temporary injunction 
issued by the Supreme Court on July 27, 1926, has enjoined further work pending 
final decision of the Court upon the proceedings brought. 



2 P. D. 48 

The pump and engine at the East Boston sewerage pumping station have been 
repaired and a concrete locker building constructed at the Chelsea side of the 
siphon leading under Chelsea Creek. The tide gate overflow and sand catcher 
at Belle Isle Inlet has been repaired. The vertical tubes in the vertical boiler 
No. 1 at the Ward Street pumping station have been replaced. The Deer Island 
wharf has been rebuilt. 

The last section of the Weston Aqueduct Supply Main was completed in June. 
Two 30-inch steel water pipes have been laid across each of the River Street and 
Western Avenue bridges between Boston and Cambridge. The Northern High- 
service pipe line in Maiden, Melrose and Stoneham was completed in September. 
Surveys and plans for the proposed pipe line from Chestnut Hill pumping station 
to the Arborway at Pond Street in Jamaica Plain, have been nearly completed. The 
new line for improving service in Belmont and Watertown has been laid but some 
of the resurfacing work is not completed. 

The River Street bridge across the Charles River was surfaced during the Spring 
and the bridge finally completed. The John W. Weeks foot bridge has been 
built and substantially completed. The plans and specifications for the Cottage 
Farm Bridge have been prepared and the contract for construction let. 

The filling and sub-grading for the Old Colony Parkway have been practically 
completed; the bridge for the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad over 
the roadway at Pope's Hill Station is under construction, and plans and specifica- 
tions for the bridge over Dorchester Bay are being prepared. 

The Northern Traffic Artery from Lechmere Square, Cambridge, to Mystic 
Avenue, Somerville, has been substantially completed and is ready for travel. 

The Quincy Shore Roadway has been widened to 40 feet and one mile of concrete 
shore protection constructed. Quannapowitt Parkway has been filled and rough 
graded from North Avenue to Lowell Street, Wakefield. The Middlesex Fells 
Parkway to Main Street, Everett, including three bridges, has been widened to 
provide for four lines of traffic in place of two. 

The West Roxbury Parkway from Weld Street, West Roxbury, to Newton 
Street, Brookline, has been completed and opened to traffic. The extension of 
Soldier's Field Road, North Harvard Street to Western Avenue has been substan- 
tially completed. Quinobequin Road, Newton, has been widened and resurfaced. 

In the Middlesex Fells, Forest Street to Elm Street, Elm Street from the Park- 
way to Highland Street and South Border Road from Forest Street for about one- 
half mile have been reconstructed and Forest and Main Streets widened. Electric 
lighting has been installed from Mystic Avenue to Elm Street, replacing the Wels- 
bach naphtha lamps. 

At Nantasket Beach the bath house yards have been repaired and 800 new lockers 
added. New gravel roofs have been placed on the cafe and pavilion and the sea 
wall extended 300 feet. 

Surveys and plans for the extension of the Lynn Fells Parkway from the present 
end at Bellevue Avenue, Melrose, to the Lynn Woods, and for the Stoneham- 
Wakefield Route from Main Street, Middlesex Fells Reservation to Quannapowitt 
Parkway, Wakefield, are being prepared. 

IV. RAINFALL AND CONSUMPTION OF WATER 

The precipitation and yield of the watersheds during the year was considerably 
below normal. The Wachusett Reservoir reached the maximum height for the 
year of 383.25 on May 24, 11.75 feet below high-water line, and 2.94 feet below 
the maximum height of the preceding year. This was the least quantity of water 
stored at time of maximum storage for any year since the reservoir first filled in 
1908, and was 3.5 billion gallons less than for the maximum storage in 1925. The 
storage was drawn down to a minimum height on December 31, of 363.18, or to 
30.6 billion gallons, or 5.86 feet lower than the minimum height for 1925, or a loss 
of 5.48 million gallons from the minimum storage of 1925. 

Chapter 375 of the Acts of 1926 created the Metropolitan District Water Supply 
Commission and authorized the extension of the water supply to the Ware River. 
This supply or some other additional supply will be required within the next 
two or three years to offset the excess of consumption over the yield of the 



P. D. 48 3 

watersheds and to prevent an unsafe reduction of storage in the Wachusett Reservoir. 
During the year 47,517,455,000 gallons of water were furnished to the 18 cities 
and towns supplied, equivalent to a daily average consumption of 130,184,800 
gallons, and for the estimated population of 1,326,080 at the rate of 98.2 gallons 
per capita, a little less than the rate in 1925. 

V. SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 19 of the Resolves of 1926 the 
Commission investigated and reported as to the advisability, expediency and cost 
of widening Nahant Road from its junction with Washington Street in the City of 
Lynn to that part of Nahant known as " Little Nahant". The report is printed 
as House Document 125 of 1927. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 29 of the Resolves of 1926 the 
Commission investigated and reported on the feasibility of constructing one or more 
public golf courses on land of the metropolitan park system. The report is printed 
as House Document 150 of 1927. 

VI. OTHER REPORTS 

The reports of the Directors of Parks, Park Engineering, Water and Sewerage, 
with tables, statistics and financial statements, are hereby presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVIS B. KENISTON, 
Metropolitan District Commissioner. 
February 28, 1927. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PARKS 

Hon. Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission, 
1 Ashburton Place, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Dear Sir: — During my service of six years as Director of Parks,I have prepared 
annual reports regarding the progress of work in the parkways and reservations of 
the Boston Metropolitan District. The following report reviews briefly some of 
the changes which have occurred during the past, and changes which may be required 
during the next decade. To compress all the available information into five or 
six pages is obviously impossible, and I have consequently confined myself to com- 
ments on outstanding features. 

A glance at the map of Boston and its environs indicates the extent of the System 
of Metropolitan Parks. It is distributed through an area of about four hundred 
square miles and through nearly forty cities and towns. About fourteen square 
miles is the area of the System. The boulevards and carriage roads amount to 
seventy miles or more. A water frontage of thirteen miles on the salt water and 
more than fifty miles on river banks is included. These shores and banks are 
safeguarded against undesirable or unsanitary private development by placing 
them in public control for recreation use. 

These extensive areas of parkway, river bank reservations, and areas of woodland, 
serve an important function in breaking up the monotony of the Metropolitan 
area which, without adequate reservations of open ground, would form a nearly 
unbroken texture of streets and houses extending mile after mile. The value of 
these open spaces in accommodating long distance pleasure vehicle travel has 
become during the past decade a notable feature, but one which cannot be given 
full rein without injury to the recreation use for which these open spaces were 
dedicated. One of the most difficult problems presented to the Commission has 
been the adaptation of roadways intended for the use of horse-drawn vehicles to 
enable them to function under the stress of intensive motor vehicle use without 
destruction of marginal plantations of trees, shrubbery and grass, and without 
bringing noise and danger into the parks themselves. 

The extent of the Park System and its active service to the community is re- 
flected in the budget of expense. For the past year, the total upkeep cost for the 



4 P. D. 48 

entire System of Metropolitan Parks, including the parkways, bathing beaches, 
and all other lands under the control of the Park System, amounted to $2,095,999.65. 
Mere mention of the following items of upkeep cost will show the extraordinary 
range and detail of the maintenance — the clearing of the ice in the Charles River 
Basin, the operation of drawbridges, the removal from the parkways and reserva- 
tions of litter and waste after holidays, the system of policing, the spraying of 
trees, tree planting, patrol of waterfront for life-saving, the provision of bathing 
suits and towels at the beaches, not to mention the upkeep of road surfaces, road 
lights, and surface water drainage systems. 

To keep these maintenance costs down to a reasonable figure without curtailing 
the usefulness of the parkways and parks to the public, constitutes a problem in 
itself. The details of this problem are many. The fuller use of bridge-tenders' 
services in the winter, when the streams are practically closed to navigation, should 
be studied. This would apply to draws like those at Craigie's Bridge, in the 
neighborhood of Lynn and elsewhere. 

The remarkable changes which have taken place for public recreation during 
the past twenty years explain the growing popularity of the bathing beaches, the 
intensive use of the park roadways, and the demand for space for playing golf. 
Many large cities of the country are providing large space for golf courses. The 
pressure to set aside areas for such use, which can be adapted to this use without 
injury to landscapes or to public service, if becoming so great that courses are being 
considered near the Neponset River Reservation on the borders of the Fowl Mead- 
ows. This ground is rapidly growing up to brush and small trees which hide pleas- 
ant views of the meadows and the Blue Hills. On this marginal land a useful 
golf course could be laid out without injury to the Reservation. Estimates of 
cost are given in the report of this Commission for December 10th, which report 
also reviews other sites in the Blue Hills and at Riverside, together with a dis- 
cussion of reasonable charges for the use of such courses. 

Among important new projects are the bridges either just finished or in the 
course of construction. Among new bridges are those at River Street and at 
Western Avenue in Cambridge. The Cottage Farm Bridge is under construction, 
with accommodations for a high-level roadway passing over the Union Freight 
Railroad, which is to be relocated to accommodate both bridge structures upon a 
single system of supports arranged in a manner to offer the least obstruction to the 
use of the river for boating purposes. Beneath this bridge an underpass is to be 
constructed for the accommodation of vehicular traffic along the western bank of 
the Charles, thus connecting Bay State Road with Cambridge without conflict 
with heavy traffic of the Cottage Farm Bridge itself. 

Legislative authorization for the construction of the so-called "Northern Artery", 
which will connect the whole system of northern reservations and parkways with 
the central and southern park systems via the Charles River Basin, has brought 
this much-needed thoroughfare nearly to completion. The bridge over the Boston 
& Maine Railroad is in place. Work in the neighborhood of Lechmere Square is 
under way, and within a few months the union of the northern and southern parts 
of the Metropolitan pleasure roads through this fink should become fully realized. 

The West Roxbury Parkway has been extended to Newton Street; Old Colony 
Parkway is in process of construction from Columbus Park southward across 
Dorchester Bay to Neponset toward the Quincy shore; the Weeks Bridge opposite 
the Harvard Business School is nearly completed; Soldiers Field Road, North 
Harvard Street to Western Avenue is nearly finished; Quinobequin Road has been 
widened and resurfaced; taking plans have been made for the extension of Bellevue 
Avenue, Melrose, to the Lynn woods; in the Middlesex Fells Parkway and Reser- 
vation much construction work is under way; at the Nantasket Beach Reservation 
bath-houses have been provided with additional lockers and a new sea wall has been 
built; the roadway at the Quincy shore has been widened and a concrete shore 
protection a mile in length has been completed; at Quannapowitt Parkway filling 
and rough grading has been carried out from North Avenue to Lowell Street in 
Wakefield; three bridges have been widened to provide four lines of traffic in place 
of two in the Revere Beach Parkway from Main Street to the Middlesex Fells 
Parkway. The need of an extension of the Riverside driveway from the Arsenal, 
skirting the Cambridge cemetery, having for its destination the Lowell Memorial 



P. D. 48 5 

Park and the Alewife Brook roadways is becoming apparent (a bridge across the 
river between the Cambridge Cemetery and the Larz Anderson Bridge may become 
necessary and is being studied by the Planning Division) ; resurfacing of roadways 
is being undertaken in Revere; the overcrowding of Craddock Bridge is raising the 
question of the provision of another bridge across the Mystic in that vicinity. 

Extensive use of the temporary bridge across the Basin opposite St. Mary's 
Street during the year or more which elapsed before the Cottage Farm Bridge was 
closed for construction work, indicates that more ample crossings of the Charles 
River Basin may be required in the near future. If accommodations on a large 
scale can be arranged for pleasure vehicles to cross the Basin in the neighborhood 
of the Charlesgate, in the manner recently suggested by Arthur A. Shurtleff for 
the Boston Park Department, the construction of a bridge at Dartmouth Street 
or of a permanent structure between the Cottage Farm Bridge and the Charlesgate 
may be postponed for a term of years, but a bridge or tunnel at Dartmouth Street 
will be needed eventually. The feasibility of using earth embankments either on 
the edges of the Basin or in its center, to reduce the length and consequently the 
cost of bridge structures, has been widely discussed and indicates the economy of 
such projects. 

More ample accommodations for the crossing of the Basin go hand in hand with 
the need for more ample accommodations for vehicles upon the edges of the Basin. 
The time has arrived when an extension of Bay State Road between the Cottage 
Farm Bridge and the Harvard Bridge certainly as tar east as Hereford Street should 
be taken in hand as a measure of public safety and convenience. 

At very moderate cost, that portion of this connection could be built from Here- 
ford Street to the Charlesgate passing under the Harvard Bridge. This desirable 
link would eliminate vexatious traffic delays which now occur on Beacon Street 
when the vehicular lanes leading to the Harvard Bridge are moving. As time goes 
on, a further extension of a marginal road from Hereford Street to the embankment 
near Beaver Street may be required in order to accommodate pleasure vehicles. 
When this extension is brought about, a more adequate connection between Arling- 
ton Street and the Basin to eliminate the present dangerous and circuitous route 
through Beaver Street doubtless will be required. At the opposite end of the Basin 
a better connection should be provided between the future marginal roads of the 
Charles River in the vicinity of River Street to make connections with Common- 
wealth Avenue over the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad, where studies 
for such connection have already been made by the Planning Division. The 
Esplanade should be extended from Charlesgate West to Cottage Farm Bridge. 

In the course of improvements along the edge of the Basin, I advocate the plant- 
ing of many long-lived trees and the use of naturalistic sloping shores, the last to 
prevent the objectionable wave action attendant upon the use of vertical sea 
walls and to save expense. 

Studies have been made for additional parking spaces to eliminate highway 
congestion at the Old Colony Parkway, Nahant, and elsewhere. With these 
highway improvements goes the requirement for a more adequate lighting system. 
This year $58,845.00 has been spent on new lights and many more are needed before 
our System will be properly lighted. 

Adequate protection for the men, women and children wishing to use the parks 
and parkways without molestation from offenders and for the protection of the 
facilities and structures of the System, necessitates a continuance of the system of 
policing. During the past year 3,800 persons have been arrested. Of these, over 
3,400 were found guilty. The greatest number of arrests were of persons violating 
the motor vehicle regulations of the District Commission (1317). Second in order 
came arrests for violation of the public statutes relating to motor vehicles (1099). 
Third in order came arrests for drunkenness (757). The police have reported a 
total of 2,436 accidents. The total fines assessed by the courts amounted to 
slightly over $28,000. The total value of property found and turned over to 
owners was nearly $100,000. 

The total expenses of the Police Department for the year were $426,700.00, of 
which about $375,000.00 was for payrolls. During the year, while in the perform- 
ance of police duty, eleven officers were injured, involving a total absence of 260 
days on account of such injuries. 



6 P. D. 48 

The present strength of the Police Department is 170. One officer was promoted 
to sergeant, three officers were retired, two officers and one sergeant resigned, and 
eleven new patrolmen were added as regular members. The general duties require 
the attention of twenty-nine superior officers and 140 regular patrolmen. The 
police work, which is greatly increased by the added land area, the greater number 
of bridges, and the additional parkways, is a heavy load, and ten additional men 
are greatly needed. The force should be brought up to 150 regular patrolmen. 
During the summer, 40 summer officers are required. To assist these men in their 
work additional traffic signals are needed. Captain Hawkins, who is in charge of 
the Police Department, has handled his work well and deserves great credit. The 
department is poorly paid, and when an opportunity for an increase of payment 
presents itself an improvement in this direction should be made. The police are 
required to carry through a regular routine of drills and are ready and equipped for 
any call of duty wherever they may be ordered in the State. They have been 
called many times and were never found wanting. New, more up-to-date uniforms 
have been provided when required. In all, the Department controls eight motor 
boats, twenty-one automobiles (six of these are used partly for maintenance work), 
thirty-nine motorcycles, three patrol wagons and ambulances. Under the Cap- 
tains of the six different divisions, the work of clearing the roads of snow is well 
performed. They use one Mack truck, twelve Liberty trucks borrowed from the 
National Guard, four five-ton Pierce Arrow trucks, and two Nash quads borrowed 
from the Department of Public Works, and three tractors. These vehicles are 
also used on other work during the year. The cost of tug-boat service for breaking 
ice in the Charles River Basin has amounted to about $10,463.00, which is paid to 
the State through the Public Safety Department. 

The Park Department Engineering force at the command of the Commission 
includes a director, senior assistant, two designing engineers and draftsmen, ten 
senior engineering assistants, fifteen assistant civil engineers, two inspectors, 
twenty-two assistants, a foreman, a chauffeur, and a supervisor of machinery; 
they are to be congratulated on the efficient work done by them under Mr. John R. 
Rablin. 

The rent paid for the headquarters building of the Commission amounts to 
$5,000.00 a year. This is an old dwelling remodeled from time to time to accom- 
modate the drafting rooms, files and offices. The building is far from fireproof, 
but contains records of priceless value. It is to be hoped that quarters better 
arranged for the protection of valuable material and with fuller equipment for 
convenience and efficiency may be found. 

The successful operation of some of the more important park facilities, notably 
at Nantasket, depends upon the letting to responsible persons of permits for 
concessions. Much care has been taken to place these important functions with 
concessionaires who are capable of giving adequate service. At the Nantasket 
Hotel a lease has been arranged which yields $22,500.00 a year. From lunch- 
rooms and other privileges leased by the Department, the receipts amount to about 
$16,829.00. Persons holding permits to operate motor boats for carrying passen- 
gers on the Charles River Basin were required to pay $100.00 during the past 
summer. 

The Commission continues its policy of keeping large buses and trucks off the 
parkways, and this should be continued, as the roads are too narrow and crowded 
for such vehicles. 

One hundred thirty band concerts have been held, employing in all twenty-two 
different bands. The attendance at these concerts, given in fourteen different 
locations, is variously estimated at from two hundred to fifteen thousand. The 
costs of such band concerts have amounted to approximately $19,991.00. 

New, modern, fireproof quarters with adequate sanitaries are needed at Revere, 
also at Mystic Lake and in Dedham. Thousands of bathers lack adequate toilet 
and other accommodations. The sanitary facilities at Revere are very old and 
most expensive to maintain. 

The cost of spraying trees to combat insect pests during the past year has 
amounted to about $64,301 .00. During the previous year the costs were $59,189.00. 

The Boston Metropolitan District has taken, earlier than other large communities 
of this country, a forward step in regional planning. Two years ago the Legislature 



Metropolitan Park System — December 1, 1926 









Reservations (Aches). 


Parkways (Acres). 




Parkways (Mileb). 






w 

a 

3 

m 


E 

3 

s 


H 


o 
o 

a 

53 


> 




1 


> 

s 

o 


2 
S 


3 
I 

a. 

■z 


■a 

01 . 


a 

> 

(3 


o 

W 

& 
| 

a 


CO 

a 


-a; 

G 


< 


3 


3 


-3 




> 


3 
» 


2 
1 

a 
Z 


a 
— 


£ 

a 

& 




a 

6- 


ffl 

-a 
a 


I 

a 
w 


O 

-a 

5 


a 
« 
a 

3 

a 


a 

! 


ft 

.9 

is 


E 
■a 

P 


m 
1 


< 


3 

s 


3 
O 


1 
1 


> 

is 


a 

> 


3 
O 

1 


> 

a 

1 

ft 

2 


-O 
a 
o 
ft, 

£ 


£ 

a 



-J 


ffl 
3 


a 

m 
fl 

a) 

2 


13 
(3 

i 
a 

a 


q 

"3 
O 

-a 

3 


1 

ft 
3 
a 

3 

a 


a 
a 

a 


d 
o 

a 

Is 


a 

O 


■J 
o 

1 
«3 


2 




1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 

g 

10 

n 

12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 

28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 


Cities 
Boston . 
Cambridge 
Chelsea 
Everett 
Lynn 
Maiden 
Medford 
Melrose 
Newton 
Quincy . 
Revere . 
Somerville 
Waltham 
Woburn 

Towns. 
Arlington 
Belmont 
Braintrco 
Brookline 
Canton . 
Cohasset . 
Dedham 
Dover . 
Hingham 
Hull . 
Milton . 
Nahant 
Needham 
[Randolph] 
Saugue 
Stoneham 
Swamp scott 
Wakefield 
Watertown 
Wellesley 
Weston 
Weatwood 
Weymouth 
Winchester 
Winthrop 




6.05 


2,562.57 

07. S4 
471.34 

1,547.68 
257.00 


59.53 
949.69 
177.54 

702.60 
261.03 


463.72 


42.77 
15.56 




4.24 

14.24 
4.58 


169.16 
13S.S6 

183.55 
38.68 

78.79 
60.07 
124.70 


42.32 
4.03 
7.83 


146.S9 

264.26 
234.54 

270.33 
G.57 


3.10 


04.29 




32.91 


25.59 


785.82 
138.86 

19.59 
59.53 
092.01 
177.54 
187.79 
2,595.48 
64.29 
4.03 
81.45 

7.S3 
15.56 
07.84 

735.60 

234.54 

25.59 
1,818.01 

14.24 
257.00 

702.60 
3.10 
22.97 
78.79 
70.05 
124.79 
0.57 

261.93 
1G.S3 


.27 
83.31 


.00 


44.50 
13.08 


21.16 
8.10 
66.31 


265.34 
4.95 
17.40 

.50.20 


75.65 
9.99 


22.76 
51.10 




7.57 

.15 


101.14 


.32 


114.50 
69.19 


50.75 
2.72 


15.54 


5.15 


8.61 


21.98 
15.16 


86.38 

9.97 

28.10 
20.43 


171.41 
98.78 
21.16 
31.16 
.32 
23.58 

318.00 
7.57 

114.50 

103.86 
80.07 
28.90 

22.64 

45.50 
20.43 

79.18 
15.16 

134.47 
81.66 

.15 
15.54 

50.80 
.13 


957.23 

237.04 

21.16 

. 31.16 

10.91 

83.11 

1,310.01 

185.11 

302.29 

2,699.34 

144.36 

32.93 

81.45 

22.64 

53.33 
35.99 
67.84 
79.18 
735.60 

249.70 

25.59 
1.952.48 
81.66 
14.24 
257.00 

702.75 
3.10 
38.51 
78.79 
70.65 
124.79 
6.57 

312.73 
16.96 


.015 
2.250 


1.31 
.07 


1.515 
2.850 

.740 


.482 
2.295 


4.45 
.38 
1.40 


1.810 
.SO 


.72 
1.5-10 




1.0G0 


4.320 




1.20 
.SO 


2.70 
.30 




.120 
.570 


.88 


49 
.49 


1.563 

.303 

.848 
.473 


5.735 
2.083 

.814 
1.662 

.120 
1.515 
7.782 
1.060 
1.200 
4.680 
3.745 
1.423 

1.310 

2.248 
.473 

1.60 
.490 

3.790 
2.230 

.060 

.774 

1.850 
.020 


1 
2 
3 
1 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 
IS 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 

28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 








6.05 


4,906.13 


2,151.29 


403.72 


58.33 


22.07 


23.00 


799.90 


54.18 


022.59 


22.09 


04.29 


16.83 


32.91 


25.50 


9,570.83 


83.58 


23.24 


82.12 


126.73 


337.S9 


85.04 


73.92 


12.40 


7.72 


101.11 


81.98 


1S3.69 


53.47 


15.54 


5.15 


8.74 


37.14 


144.88 


1.404.07 


11.035.S0 


2.265 


1.38 


5.105 


5.253 


S.01 


2.61 


2.200 


.520 


1.120 


4.320 


2.230 


2.00 


3.06 


.774 


.690 


.90 


.98 


3. 187 


46.604 





P. D. 48 7 

appointed a Metropolitan Planning Division made up of a representative of the 
following State Commissions : Department of Public Works, Public Utilities Board, 
Metropolitan District Commission, and the Transit Department of the City of 
Boston. Three others, including the Chairman, are appointed by the Governor. 
The men who have been appointed to these several positions are: Henry I. Harri- 
man, Chairman; A. C. Ratshesky, Ralph S. Bauer, Everett E. Stone, Richard 
K. Hale, James B. Noyes, and Frank G. Hall. 

The activities of this Planning Division during the past three years have been 
notable. This work includes plans for the approaches, underpasses, and general 
design of the Cottage Farm Bridge. The project to unite the northern and southern 
portions of the District with a wide thoroughfare connecting the northern parkways 
at Somerville with the parkways of the Charles River Basin has already been 
mentioned. The Board has recently reported a co-ordinated scheme for railroad 
transportation lines of the District and various projects for the extension of the 
main thoroughfares, chiefly roadways of a circumferential type intended to enable 
traffic to find its way around centers of congestion, as for example the so-called 
Southern Artery and the projects now under construction for a main circumferential 
route swinging around the southerly, westerly and northerly sides of the District 
from Braintree to Lynn. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK G. HALL, Director of Parks. 
December 31, 1926. 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF 
ENGINEER OF PARK ENGINEERING 

Hon. Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Dear Sir: — I submit the following report of the work done under the direction 
and supervision of the Engineering Department of the Parks Division, during the 
year ending December 31, 1926. 

The engineering force has been somewhat increased, due to the large amount of 
work in progress and the average organization during the year has consisted of one 
Chief Engineer, one senior assistant engineer, fourteen assistant engineers, two 
engineering inspectors, three designing engineers, thirty-nine engineering assist- 
ants, four clerks and stenographers, one garage foreman, one chauffeur, one 
supervisor of machinery, one electrical engineer superintendent. Forty-four 
drawbridge attendants also are under the authority of the Chief Engineer. 

Plans and specifications were prepared and fifteen contracts let for works aggre- 
gating about three and one-half millions of dollars ($3,500,000) in cost. Included 
in this work were the construction of five bridges, one in Old Colony Parkway, 
two in Northern Traffic Artery and two over the Charles River Basin; the construc- 
tion of 5.08 miles of new boulevard and the reconstruction of about 6 miles of exist- 
ing boulevard. 

The work on three of the contracts made in 1925, the River Street Bridge, Mt. 
Vernon Street Bridge, and filling in Dorchester Bay for Old Colony Parkway, has 
been completed this year. 

The work under the contracts let this year, has been wholly or substantially 
completed except in three cases, two of which it was not expected to finish. The 
work on several of the contracts, although substantially completed so that it could 
be opened to public use, ran so late into the fall that it was not possible to do the 
final cleaning and trimming up. This work will be done in the early spring. 

Construction plans are in progress for the completion of Old Colony Parkway, 
including the bridge over Dorchester Bay; also, for the completion of the Northern 
Traffic Artery, including bridge over Lechmere Canal and the remodelling of the 
garage and storage building of the Commission on Commercial Avenue, Cambridge. 

Surveys and plans are in progress for the acquirement of land for the extension of 
Lynn Fells Parkway from the present ending at Bellevue Avenue, Melrose, to Lynn 
Woods as a link in the Circumferential Highway; for the acquirement of land for 
the Stoneham-Wakefield Route from Main Street at Middlesex Fells Reservation, 
Stoneham, to Quannapowitt Parkway at Wakefield. 



8 P. D. 48 

In connection with the work of maintenance, operation and repairs to bridges, 
dams, lock and gates, extensive repairs have been made to several of the bridges 
including the widening of three bridges on the Revere Beach Parkway between 
Middlesex Fells Parkway and Main Street, Everett; also, repairs and repaving of 
Wellington Bridge. 

The installation of an electric street lighting system to replace existing Welsbach 
naphtha lamps, has been extended during this year by the completion of the section 
of Middlesex Fells Parkway from Mystic Avenue, Somerville, to Elm Street, 
Medford, a distance of 3.7 miles. 179-600 candle power incandescent lamps, 
suspended from bracket arms attached to the trolley poles were installed. These 
lamps are served from armored cable laid in the ground without conduits. 

The cost of conducting the department has been as follows: 

Engineering: 
Construction: 

Services $76,234.96 

Expenses 5,670.48 

. $81,905.44 



Maintenance : 

Services $32,531.19 

Expenses 2,750.78 



$35,281.97 

Total $117,187.41 

The following is a detailed list of the work done under the direction of the Engi- 
neering Department. 

Parkways 

Cambridge Parkway. — Changes have been made at the northerly end of Memo- 
rial Drive to widen the entrance to the approach to the West Boston Bridge. The 
cost of the work was about $3,500.00. 

Lynn Fells Parkway. — The work of making surveys and preparing taking plans 
for the extension of the parkway from Bellevue Avenue, Melrose, to Lynn Woods, 
a distance of 3.03 miles, is in progress. The first section from Bellevue Avenue 
to the Saugus Line is nearly completed and it is expected to make a taking of this 
section at once, as much of the land has been cut up into house lots and building 
operations are in progress. 

Middlesex Fells Parkway. — Wellington Bridge has been repaired and repaved 
under contract No. 96 with Simpson Bros. Corporation. The work was begun 
May 25, 1926, and completed July 21, 1926, at a total cost of $21,419.74. The 
work consisted of removing the existing old wood block pavement on both sections 
of the bridge and the repaving of the northerly section of the bridge from the 
drawbridge to the Medford shore with granite block, and the repaving of the south- 
erly section from the drawbridge to the Somerville shore with wood block, using 
as much of the old block, which was removed, as was suitable. The floor of the 
drawbridge was wholly reconstructed with new lumber. 

Under contract No. 101 with James H. Fannon, the work of resurfacing the 
westerly drive of the parkway from Forest Street to Elm Street was begun August 
2, 1926, and completed November 2, 1926. The work consisted of reconstruction 
of this section of roadway with bituminous macadam, at a total cost of $7,963.12. 

A new system of electric street lighting has been installed in this parkway from 
Mystic Avenue, Somerville, to Elm Street, Medford, a distance of 3.7 miles. The 
materials were purchased by the Purchasing Bureau of the Department of Admin- 
istration and Finance upon requisition and specifications of this Department, and 
the cable, consisting of 49,678 feet of armored parkway cable, was laid by the forces 
of Middlesex Fells Division. The type of fixtures is the same as that on Revere 
Beach Parkway, 600 candle power incandescent units suspended from bracket arms 
on iron poles. In this case, however, the bracket arms were attached to the trolley 
poles of the Boston Elevated Railway, already located in the parkway, thereby 
saving the cost of new poles and eliminating the duplication of poles in the parkway. 
There are 179 new lamps replacing 190 Welsbach naphtha lamps. This system was 
turned on for operation December 23, 1926. The lamps in Somerville from Mystic 



P. D. 48 9 

Avenue to the channel of Mystic River are operated by the Edison Electric Illu- 
minating Company of Boston, and those from Mystic River to Elm Street, by the 
Maiden Electric Company. 

Northern Traffic Artery. — Under contract No. 92 with Coleman Bros., Incor- 
porated, the work of constructing bridge for the Northern Traffic Artery over the 
Southern Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad, was begun June 1, 1926, and 
is substantially completed. The work consists of building concrete abutments 
and retaining walls along the approaches, and the building and erection of steel 
truss bridge 100 feet in width and of 171 % feet span. This bridge is built to span 
8 tracks, 6 of the Boston & Maine Railroad, and 2 possible rapid transit tracks. 
The cost of the work under this contract has been $192,913.80. 

Under contract No. 97 with Coleman Bros., Incorporated, the work of grading, 
surfacing and other work for the construction of the Northern Traffic Artery from 
Lechmere Square to the bridge over the Boston & Maine Railroad, Cambridge and 
Somerville, was begun June 21, 1926, and is substantially completed. The road- 
way is generally 80 feet in width, and is paved with granite blocks on concrete 
base and cement grouted joints. Sidewalks are paved with granolithic or brick. 
Two car tracks of the Boston Elevated Railway are located in the center of the 
roadway. In connection with this work it was necessary to rebuild sewers, water 
pipes and conduits. The total length of the work under this contract was 1.3 
miles, and the total cost, $343,883.51. 

Under contract No. 102 with Coleman Bros., Incorporated, work of building 
section from the Boston & Maine Railroad Bridge to Mystic Avenue, Somerville, 
was begun July 29, 1926, and is substantially completed. Considerable of this 
section is laid out with two roadways, each 40 feet in width, and 10 feet planting 
strip between. The roadways are paved with granite block on concrete base as 
in the previous section and the sidewalks are paved with granolithic generally. 
The pavement on the approach to the bridge over the Boston & Maine Railroad 
has been laid in a temporary manner on account of possible settlements of the deep 
fill, with the intention of removing in the spring and repaving on the concrete 
base after settlements have taken place. There are no car tracks in this section 
and water and gas pipes and conduits have been laid throughout. 

A new electric lighting system has been installed by the Edison Electric Illu- 
minating Company of Boston throughout both sections of the Artery and consists 
of underground conduits and cables with ornamental poles and magnetite arc 
lamps. 

Although not shown on the original plans, by an agreement with the City of 
Somerville, a bridge has been constructed to carry the Artery over Gilman Street, 
Somerville. Gilman Street crosses the Artery on the approach to the Boston & 
Maine Railroad Bridge. It was thought by the Commission that the street was 
not so important a thoroughfare as to require construction of the bridge, but the 
City of Somerville desired that it be kept open and agreed to pay part of the cost 
of construction of the bridge. This work was done by Coleman Bros., Incorporated, 
in connection with their work of building bridge over Boston & Maine Railroad. 
The total cost of the Gilman Street Bridge was $37,492.29. 

Nahant Beach Parkway. — Extensive repairs were made in the spring to the 
Nahant Bath house and yards. The wood work in the yards had become rotted 
and it was necessary to replace a large proportion of it. The cost of this work was 
$19,900.78. 

Chapter 19 of the Resolves of 1926 required a report from this Commission on 
the feasibility of widening Nahant Road and providing parking space for automo- 
biles. Investigations were made and report made to the legislature recommending 
the use of the space between the roadway and the street car tracks on the southerly 
side of the roadway for parking purposes. 

Old Colony Parkway. — The work of furnishing and placing filling material in 
Dorchester Bay under contract No. 84 with the Bay State Dredging & Contracting 
Company, which was begun June 13, 1925, was completed about October 1, 1926. 
The total of about 1,500,000 cubic yards of material was required, at a total cost of 
$1,002,424.29. 

Work under contract No. 85 with Coleman Bros., Incorporated, for construction 
of bridge over Mt. Vernon Street near the junction of the parkway with Strandway, 



10 P. D. 48 

which was begun September 7, 1925, was completed June 26, 1926, at a total cost 
of $120,615.15. 

Under contract No. 90 with Coleman Bros., Incorporated, work of grading, 
surfacing, building bridge for the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
over the Old Colony Parkway near Popes Hill Station, was begun October 15, 
1926, and is still in progress. 

Construction plans are in progress for bridge over Dorchester Bay and for sur- 
facing and finishing the section from Freeport Street to Strandway. The bridge 
over the bay is to be of concrete and stone masonry 70 feet in width and of 5 spans, 
4 of reinforced concrete and the center span to be steel bascule drawbridge. 

Quannapowitt Parkway. — Under contract No. 89 with the Greenough Con- 
struction Co., work of grading and other work from North Avenue to Lowell 
Street, Wakefield, was begun February 24, 1926, and was completed June 18, 
1926, at a total cost of $29,127.44. 

Revere Beach Parkway. — The section of Revere Beach Parkway from Middle- 
sex Fells Parkway to Main Street, Everett, has been widened to provide for the 
increased amount of traffic. The roadway was originally constructed of a tem- 
porary width of 28 feet and has been widened to 36 feet, which will provide for 4 
lines of traffic. The work of surfacing was done by the forces of Revere Beach 
Division. 

Incidental to the widening, three bridges, two over the Boston & Maine Railroad, 
and one over the Maiden River, were widened. The work was done by the Boston 
Bridge Works and Maurice M. Devine. 

The work of installing electric lighting system in Revere Beach Parkway, which 
was not wholly completed in 1925, was finished early this year and the whole 
system has been in operation during the year. 

West Roxbury Parkway. — The acquirement of land for extension of West 
Roxbury Parkway from Weld Street, West Roxbury, to Newton Street, Brookline, 
has been completed. 

Under contract No. 94 with Thomas Joseph McCue Construction Company, 
the work of constructing this section was begun May 13, 1926, and completed 
November 24, 1926, at a total cost of $135,757.46. 

Reservations 

Charles River Reservation, Upper Division. — Quinobequin Road between Boylston 
Street, Newton Lower Falls, and Boylston Street, Newton Upper Falls, has been 
widened and resurfaced by the forces of Charles River Upper Division. The total 
length of the road is about 1.8 miles, and it was formerly only about 12 feet wide. 
The roadway surface has been widened to 18 feet and some of the sharp curves 
eliminated. 

Charles River Reservation, Lower Basin. — Under contract No. 93 with T. Stuart 
& Son Company for the construction of the John W. Weeks Bridge across the 
Charles River Basin, opposite DeWolfe Street, Cambridge, work was begun July 
1, 1926, and is substantially completed. The work remaining to be done is the 
carving of the seals and lettering, the furnishing and erection of bronze work for 
lamp posts, lamps and tablets, and the grading of the approaches. This work 
will be done in the early spring. This bridge is for pedestrian traffic only and 
funds for its construction were presented to Harvard College by the Associates of 
Honorable John W. Weeks. By act of the legislature the Trustees of Harvard 
College presented the structure to the Commonwealth, the work of construction to 
be done by this Commission. The architectural features of the design were pre- 
pared by McKim, Mead & White of New York. The bridge is primarily to connect 
Harvard College in Cambridge with the new group of the Harvard Graduate 
School of Business Administration on the Boston side of the river. 

Under contract No. 103 for construction of an extension of Soldiers Field Road 
from North Harvard Street to Western Avenue with Thomas Joseph McCue 
Construction Company, work was begun September 13, 1926, and completed to 
such an extent that it was open to public traffic during the winter. Some work of 
finishing planting spaces, slopes and sidewalks is yet to be done. 

Under contract No. 62 with T. Stuart & Son Company, the work of building 
Cottage Farm Bridge was begun about November 1, 1926, and is now in progress. 



P. D. 48 11 

This work consists of the construction of a highway bridge on the site of the old 
wooden trestle bridge, the relocation of the Grand Junction Branch of the Boston 
& Albany Railroad, and construction of a new bridge across the river for same, 
the extension of Bay State Road underneath the highway bridge and under the 
relocated railroad to provide a future extension along the easterly river bank to 
Cambridge Street. 

Under contract No. 100 with J. F. White Contracting Company, work of grading 
on the Boston approach for the relocation of the railroad was begun July 26, 1926, 
and suspended on account of delay in removal of the St. Alphonsus Boat House. 
Work was again resumed in December and has been completed, at a total cost of 
$7,087.06. 

Under contract No. 99 the Bay State Dredging & Contracting Company rebuilt 
about 1,000 feet of the river wall between Broad and Lechmere Canals on the 
Cambridge side, and about 200 feet at the Bay State Road Extension. Work was 
begun July 19, 1926, and is still in progress. 

Middlesex Fells Reservation. — Under contract No. 101 with James H. Fannon, 
work of resurfacing Elm Street from Middlesex Fells Parkway to Highland Avenue 
and South Border Road, a distance of about one quarter mile from South Street, 
was begun August 2, 1926, and completed November 2, 1926. The work consisted 
of reconstructing these sections of roadway with bituminous macadam, at a total 
cost of $26,849.64. 

Incidental to the work on South Border Road, a new connection was made 
between South Border Road and the northerly roadway of Middlesex Fells Parkway 
at the junction of Forest Street. This work included the construction of a masonry 
culvert for the brook. 

Extensive repairs were required to the observation tower on the land conveyed 
to the Commonwealth last year by the Lawrence Estate. It was necessary to 
repair the steel work and rebuild the wooden floors at each landing. This work was 
done by A. P. Rounds at a cost of $4,402.78. 

New carpenter and paint shop has been built at Middlesex Fells Headquarters. 
Plans were prepared by this Department and work done by Henry E. West, Builder, 
at a total cost of $5,802.95. 

Nantasket Beach Reservation. — Extensive repairs and changes have been made 
in the bath house yards, with the addition of 800 steel lockers. The gravel roofs 
on the cafe and pavilion of the hotel have been relaid and repairs have been made 
to the boiler house chimney, which required repointing and repairs to the top. 
The rubbish incinerator has been relined with fire brick. 

The sea wall along the front of the cafe has been extended 300 feet. This latter 
work and the work of bath house repairs was done by the forces of the Division. 
The other work was done by contract. 

Quincy Shore Reservation. — Under contract No. 91 with Paul Caputo, the work 
of constructing shore protection and widening and reconstruction of the roadway 
along the reservation from Hancock Street, Atlantic, to Fenno Street, was begun 
May 17, 1926, and completed November 15, 1926, at a total cost of $249,972.24. 
The shore protection consists of concrete wall with series of steps and curb above. 
The total length of shore protection constructed is about 1 mile. The total length 
of roadway widened and reconstructed, was about 2 1-3 miles. 

Stoneham-W 'akefield Route. — Surveys and plans for acquirement of land for 
parkway from Main Street at Middlesex Fells Reservation to Quannapowitt 
Parkway in Wakefield, are in progress. 

Bridges and Locks 

All work of maintenance and repair of bridges and locks and operation of draw- 
bridges has been done under the direction and supervision of this department. 

It was proposed to paint and repair the lock gates at Charles River Dam in 
November of this year, but at the request of the shipping interests, the work was 
postponed to February, 1927. 

The work of ice breaking in the Charles River Basin for the season of 1925 and 
1926 was done by the police boat owned by the Commonwealth, at a total cost 
of $10,463.69. Work was begun December 18, 1925, and completed March 25, 
1926. 



12 P. D. 48 

The following is a record of the traffic through locks and drawbridges during 
the year: 

Charles River Dam and Locks 



Number of openings, 4,767 
Number of vessels, 7,505 
Number of boats, 2,131 
Lumber (feet B. M.), 1,663,482 
Coal (tons), 268,361 
Oil (barrels), 651,120 
Empty barrels, 34,893 



Piling (lineal feet), 25,295 
Marble (tons), 109 
Sand (tons), 427,207 
Gravel (tons), 199,795 
Rubble stone (tons), 36,890 
Granite (tons), 4,502 
Miscellaneous (tons), 125 



There were 3,694 drawbridge openings. 



Cradock Bridge Lock 

Number of boats over rollway, 170 



Maiden River Bridge 

Number of vessels, 685 



Neponset Bridge 

Number of vessels, 425 



Saugus River Bridge 

Number of vessels, 1,145 



Number of openings, 324 
Number of boats, 384 



Number of openings, 383 
Number of openings, 295 
Number of openings, 797 

Number of openings, 146 

General 
The road repairs and maintenance have been done by the forces of the various 
divisions under the supervision and direction of the Engineering Department. 

All bridges under the care and control of the Commission have been inspected 
twice during the year and estimates of cost of repairs included in the budget. 

Respectfully submitted, 
JOHN R. RABLIN, Chief Engineer and Director of Park Engineering. 
Boston, February 16, 1927. 



Wellington Bridge 

Number of vessels, 210 



P. D. 48 

Table I. — Data relating to Metropolitan Park System 
Areas of Reservations and Parkways 
Reservations : Acres 

Blue Hills 4,906.43 



13 



Bunker Hill 
Middlesex Fells . 
Stony Brook 
Beaver Brook 
Hart's Hill . 
Hemlock Gorge . 
Charles River 
Mystic River 
Neponset River . 
King's Beach and Lynn Shore 
Revere Beach 
Winthrop Shore . 
Quincy Shore 
Nantasket Beach 
Total . 



Parkways: 
Hammond Pond 
Blue Hills . 
Old Colony 
Woburn 
Middlesex Fells 
Revere Beach 
Mystic Valley 
Neponset River 
Fresh Pond 
Lynn Fells . 
Furnace Brook 
Nahant Beach 
Lynnway 
Winthrop . 
Dedham 
Alewife Brook 
West Roxbury 
Quannapowitt 
Total . 



Grand total, reservations and parkways 



Lengths of Formal Roads Constructed 



6.05 
2,151.29 

463.72 
58.33 
22.97 
23.06 

799.89 
54.18 

922.59 
22.69 
64.29 
16.83 
32.91 
25.59 



183.69 
83.58 
53.47 
23.24 
82.12 

126.73 

337.89 

73.92 

12.40 

7.72 

101.14 

81.98 

5.15 

8.74 

37.14 

144.88 
85.64 
15.54 



9,570.83 



1,464.97 
11,035.80 



Double Single 
Roadways Roadways 

Reservations : Miles Miles 

Charles River — 5.77 

Lynn Shore — 1.12 

Quincy Shore - — 2.24 

Revere Beach — 2.70 

Winthrop Shore — 1.07 



Parkways : 






Alewife Brook .... 


• • • • 


.70 


Blue Hills 


1.46 


1.61 


Cambridge 


. . . . .37 


3.19 


Dedham 


— 


.89 


Fresh Pond .... 


— 


.50 


Furnace Brook .... 


— 


4.32 



12.90 



14 



Parkways : 
Lynn Fells . 
Lynnway 
Middlesex Fells 
Mystic Valley 
Nahant Beach 
Neponset River 
Old Colony 
Revere Beach 
West Roxbury 
Winthrop . 
Woburn 



P. D. 48 



Double Single 
Roadways Roadways 



Miles 



4.10 



1.45 



*Equivalent in miles of single roadway 

Highways transferred by or taken from cities and towns : 

Alewife Brook Parkway . 

Blue Hills Reservation 

Charles River Reservation 

Middlesex Fells Reservation 

Nantasket Beach Reservation 

Length of automobile roads in reservations : 

Blue Hills 

Charles River 

Middlesex Fells 

Stony Brook 



7.38< 



Miles 

1.05 

.68 

1.77 

6.17 

.50 

.76 

1.51 

3.73 

2.85 

1.09 

1.38 

32.70 



32.70 
14.76 



Miles 
.44 

1.23 
.39 

6.63 
.71 



5.35 
2.80 
4.06 
3.25 



9.40 



Grand total 

All above roads open to automobile traffic. 

Length of Carriage Roads and Bridle Paths in Reservations 
Blue Hills Reservation 
Middlesex Fells Reservation 
Stony Brook Reservation 
Beaver Brook Reservation 
Charles River Reservation 



15.46 

85.22 

Miles 

27.08 

14.55 

1.60 

.22 

.89 



Total .' 44.34 



Lights in Parkways and Reservations 

Alewife Brook Parkway (arc lights) 

Blue Hills Parkway (Welsbach gas) 

Charles River Reservation, Upper Division, Soldier's Field Road, Arsenal 

Road and North Beacon Street, Arsenal Street Bridge (electric) 
Charles River Reservation, Boston Embankment (electric) 

Cambridge Parkway (electric) 

Charles River Reservation, Lower Basin, Dam and Lock (arc) 

Harvard Bridge (electric) .... 

Western Avenue Bridge (electric) . 

Temporary Cottage Farm Bridge (electric) 

Fresh Pond Parkway (electric) 

Furnace Brook Parkway (Welsbach gas) 

Lynn Fells Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) 

Lynn Shore Reservation (electric) . 

Lynnway (electric) 

Middlesex Fells Parkway (electric) 

Middlesex Fells Reservation (Welsbach naphtha) 

Middlesex Fells Reservation (electric) . 



Lights 
10 
80 

20 
106 
202 
16 
30 
14 
10 
15 
79 
17 
30 
10 
171 
29 
55 



P. D. 48 

Mystic Valley Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) 
Nahant Beach Parkway (electric) . 
Nantasket Beach Reservation (electric) 
Old Colony Parkway (electric) 
Quincy Shore Reservation (Welsbach gas) . 
Revere Beach Parkway (electric) . 
Revere Beach Reservation (electric) 
Winthrop Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) 
Winthrop Parkway (electric) .... 
Winthrop Shore Reservation (electric) . 

Total 



Lynn Shore 
Nahant Beach . 
Revere Beach 
Winthrop Shore 
Nantasket Beach 
Quincy Shore 

Total . 



Miles of Seashore 



Lengths of Sea Walls 

Lynn Shore 

Revere Beach at Northern Circle 

Revere Beach at Eliot Circle 

Revere Beach, shore protection, bath house shelter and Revere Street 

shelter 

Revere Beach, shore protection, south of Northern Circle .... 

Winthrop Shore, bridge to Great Head 

Winthrop Shore, bridge to Grover's Cliff . 

Quincy Shore Reservation, shore protection south of Webster Street 

Quincy Shore Reservation, southerly end . 

Nantasket Beach Reservation . . 

Winthrop Parkway, near Leverett Avenue, Revere and Winthrop Broad 

Sound Avenue to Sewali Avenue . . 

Total - . 



Charles River 
Mystic River 
Neponset River 
Alewife Brook 

Total . 



Miles of River Bank 



15 
Lights 
60 
7 l 
29* 
46 
78 
181 
119 3 
6 
19 
7 

1,446 

Miles 
1.50 
3.92 
2.74 
1.71 
1.02 
2.19 

13.08 

Miles 

1.30 

.08 

.15 

.29 
.28 

1.04 
.23 

1.08 
.15 
.50 

.52 

5.62 

Miles 
33.34 

8.16 
15.86 

4.50 

61.86 



Reinforced concrete bridges 
Steel bridges 
Wooden bridges 
Drawbridges 
Footbridges. 



Bridges 



Total 



16 
11 

8* 

6 
12 



53 



J Five additional lights, June 1 to December 1. 

2 Five additional lights in summer. 

s Thirty-three electric all night, May 1 to October 31. Thirty-three electrio to midnight, June 1 to 

September 30. Six all night, May 1 to September 30. 
4 One-half of Wellington bridge rebuilt with concrete girders. 



16 P. D. 48 

Culverts 
Reinforced concrete and other masonry culverts 42 

• 

Dams 

Beaver Brook Reservation, small wooden dams 2 

Charles River Reservation, wooden dam at Waltham, 220 feet in length 
Charles River Reservation, Charles River Basin tidal dam, 1,200 feet in 

length 

Charles River Reservation, small stone dam in branch below Washington 

Street, Newton Lower Falls 

Charles River Reservation, reinforced concrete dam at Washington 

Street, Newton Lower Falls, 175 feet in length 

Furnace Brook Parkway, reinforced concrete dam upstream from Black's 

Creek Bridge 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, small stone masonry dam with stop planks, 

in gorge 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, small reinforced concrete dam on East 

Branch of river, Newton Upper Falls 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, reinforced concrete dam in Charles River 

at Boylston Street, Newton Upper Falls, 90 feet in length . 
Mystic River Reservation, reinforced concrete tidal dam at Cradock 

Bridge, 100 feet in length; weirs 400 feet in length .... 



Total 



Lock Gates, Sluice Gates and Tide Gates 
Charles River Reservation, Charles River Basin tidal dam, 6 lock gates, 

13 sluice gates, 43 tide gates. 
Mystic River Reservation, Cradock Bridge tidal dam, 2 lock gates, 4 

sluice gates, 8 tide gates. 
Quincy Shore Reservation, 8 tide gates. 
Revere Beach Parkway, 1 tide gate. 

Police Signal System Miles 

Blue Hills Division 303^ 

Middlesex Fells Division 1834 

Nantasket Beach Division 23^ 

Charles River Reservation 10 

Fresh Pond Parkway 3^ 

Total 61% 

Revere Beach Division police signal system, serving 11 miles of parkways and 
reservations, and Middlesex Fells Division, serving 13^ miles of parkway, on wires 
leased from the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF 
ENGINEER OF WATER DIVISION 

Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Sir: — I respectfully submit the following report of the construction and main- 
tenance operations of the Water Division for the calendar year 1926. 

ORGANIZATION 

The number of supervising, clerical and engineering employees was 53. A 
labor force including 292 employees at the beginning and 290 at the end of the 



P. D. 48 17 

year was engaged in maintaining and operating the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe 
lines, hydro-electric and pumping stations and in doing miscellaneous construction 
work. The average number of employees of all classes for the entire year was 362. 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT AND WORKS 

The Water District now includes 20 municipalities with an area of about 174 
square miles and population as of July 1, 1926, of 1,424,480. The water works 
lands include an area of about 19,000 acres, of which about 2,000 acres have been 
planted with pine trees. The works include 9 storage reservoirs with 200 square 
miles of tributary watershed, a total storage capacity of 80 billion gallons and 
water surface of 8,600 acres; 60 miles of aqueducts; 2 hydro-electric power stations 
of a capacity of 7,000 horse power; 16 miles of high-tension power transmission 
line; 5 distribution pumping stations with a combined equipment of 6,560 horse 
power and pumping capacity of 280 million gallons a day; 12 distribution reservoirs 
with a capacity of 23^ billion gallons, and 146.28 miles of distribution mains. The 
consumption of water from the Metropolitan Water Works during the year by the 
18 municipalities regularly supplied was 47,517,455,000 gallons, equivalent to an 
average daily consumption of 130,184,800 gallons or 98.2 gallons per capita for a 
population of 1,326,080 in the district supplied. 

CONSTRUCTION 

Pumping Equipment, Northern High Service 

The work of installing the additional pumping equipment at the Spot Pond 
Station in Stoneham has been completed. Early in the year, while preparing 
for the official duty trial of the new engine, it was discovered that both the 
high and the low pressure steam cylinders were so badly scored that it was 
necessary to rebore them. This work was done and the new pistons were fitted 
in June. 

The official duty trial of 12 hours duration was made October 6, and during this 
period work was performed at the rate of 141.223 million foot pounds per 1,000 
pounds of saturated steam supplied to the engine at a pressure of 150 pounds per 
square inch. 

The machine is a horizontal cross-compound crank and fly-wheel condensing 
pumping engine of the opposed type, with fly-wheel between the steam and water 
ends, and has a capacity to deliver 20 million gallons in 24 hours against a head of 
150 feet. It was built and installed by the Worthington Pump and Machinery 
Corporation for the sum of $68,300. 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains 

The work begun in 1925 by the C. & R. Construction Company of furnishing and 
laying riveted steel pipes 60 inches in diameter in Arlington and Somerville was 
suspended early in February because of unfavorable weather, was resumed April 
12 and was completed June 16. The total length of main pipe line laid on this 
section of the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains is 7,400 feet and the total value 
of the contract work $228,229.28. 

Future Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains on River Street and Western 

Avenue Bridges 

In connection with the construction by the Parks Division of the new bridges 
over the Charles River at River Street and Western Avenue between Boston and 
Cambridge, it was deemed advisable to lay four lines of 30-inch steel water pipes 
under the sidewalks at these bridges for use several years hence as a part of an 
additional Weston Aqueduct Supply Main. These pipes were furnished and laid 
by the C. & R. Construction Company between September 13 and October 30 as 
a part of the contract for the Watertown Branch of the Weston Aqueduct Supply 
Mains. The length of the pipe laid on the bridges is 1,481 feet and the cost of the 
work was $17,748.40. 



18 P. D. 48 

Northern High Service Pipe Lines 
The work begun in 1925 by Cenedella & Company of furnishing and laying riveted 
steel pipes 38 inches in diameter in Maiden, Melrose and Stoneham was suspended 
early in February because of unfavorable weather, was resumed March 15, and 
was completed September 18. The total length of main pipe line laid is 7,300 
feet and total value of the contract work, including $18,800 for rock excavation, is 
$145,074.81. For this pipe line easements were taken in 8,597 square feet of city 
of Maiden park land in 1925. 

Southern High Service Pipe Lines 

The surveys and plans for the proposed pipe line from Chestnut Hill Pumping 
Station to the Arborway, at Pond Street in Jamaica Plain, have been nearly com- 
pleted. A contract that will amount to about $30,000 was made with the Feil 
Manufacturing Company of Chicago, September 16, for furnishing the gate valves 
required for the pipe line, and this work was well advanced at the close of the year. 

Improvement of Service in Belmont and Watertown 

The work of improving the service in Belmont and Watertown, begun in 1925, 
has been continued. A contract was made with the C. & R. Construction Company, 
July 20, for furnishing and laying riveted steel pipes 30 inches in diameter for a 
branch line 5,770 feet in length from the Metropolitan Water Works main in Cen- 
tral Street, Waltham, to the Watertown distribution main in Pleasant Street, in 
order to supply the low area along the Charles River in Watertown from the 
Weston Aqueduct Service instead of from the Southern High Service as at present. 
At the close of the year the pipe line had been laid and tested but some resurfacing 
work remains to be done to complete the contract. 

The value of the work done on this branch line under this contract is $64,127. 
For this line easements were taken in 71 square feet of land of Robert R. and 
Mary E. Wagner, and in 993 square feet of Boston & Maine Railroad land in 
Waltham. 

On June 26 the local distribution service on the hills in the southerly portion 
of Belmont and the northerly portion of Watertown was separated from the service 
in the lower sections of the towns by closing several controlling gate valves in each 
town and since that time the pressure on the 20-inch Metropolitan Water Works 
main supplying these districts has been maintained about 60 feet higher than 
formerly by booster pumping, using the equipment in the city of Newton emer- 
gency pumping station located near the Waban Hill Reservoir, from which these 
districts were formerly supplied. 

Meters and Connections 

During the year Venturi meters were installed in the new 60-inch Weston Aque- 
duct Supply Main and on the connection to the local distribution pipes near the 
Mystic Shops in Somerville. An unmetered connection was made at this place 
between the new main and the old Mystic Water Works 30-inch force main. A 
12-inch and a 20-inch unmetered connection were also laid from the new 38-inch 
Northern High Service Mains in Fellsway East near Border Road and at Highland 
Avenue. 

The total expenditure for meters and connections during the year was $1,303.78. 

Improving Wachusett Watershed 

The Holden Textile Company's property at Dawsonville in Holden, including 
13 tenement houses, the mill structure and 16 acres of land with appurtenant water 
rights, was purchased on June 29 with the special appropriation made by the Legis- 
lature for the protection of the Wachusett supply. 

Extensions of the Works 

Appropriations have been requested for installing a new pumping engine at the 
Arlington Pumping Station and for the making of surveys and construction plans 
for an additional Weston Aqueduct Supply Main, and an additional Northern High 
Service Pipe Line from Maiden to Winthrop. 



P. D. 48 



MAINTENANCE 



19 



Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 

The precipitation was from 1.5 to 2.0 inches above normal on the Wachusett 
watershed in February, October and November; about normal in December but 
during each of the other months it was from 1 to 2 inches below normal. On the 
Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds the precipitation was above normal in August, 
but with this exception varied from the normal about the same as on the Wachusett 
watershed. 

The total precipitation for the year was 39.31 inches on the Wachusett water- 
shed, which is 5.74 inches below the average for 30 years; 41.41 inches on the Sud- 
bury watershed, which is 3.06 inches below the average for 52 years, and 40.41 
inches on the Cochituate watershed, which is 4.64 inches below the average for 64 
years. 

The average daily yield per square mile from the watersheds was 826,000 gallons 
from the Wachusett, which is 24 per cent below normal; 746,000 gallons from the 
Sudbury, which is 23 per cent below normal, and 837,000 gallons from the Cochit- 
uate, which is 10 per cent below normal. These yields make 32.8 billion gallons 
on the Wachusett watershed and 7.5 billion gallons on the portion of the Sudbury 
watershed above the dam of Framingham Reservoir No. 3. As the water in storage 
in the reservoirs on these areas was reduced by 8.9 billion gallons, there was a 
total of 49.2 billion gallons supplied for all purposes from the areas from which the 
Metropolitan supply was obtained in 1926. Of this total supply 1.8 billion gallons 
was used by the city of Worcester, towns of Clinton and Framingham, the West- 
borough Insane Hospital and for maintaining a flow in the Nashua River below the 
Wachusett Dam, and the remainder was supplied to the Metropolitan District. 

Storage Reservoirs 

The capacities of the storage reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water Works, the 
elevation of the water surfaces and the quantity of water stored in each reservoir 
at the beginning and at the end of the year are shown by the following table: — 





Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
High 

Water 


Capacity 
(Gallons) 


Jan. 1, 1926 


Jan. 1, 1927 


Storage Reservoirs 


Eleva- 
tion 1 
of 

Water 
Sur- 
face 


Amount 

Stored 

(Gallons) 


Eleva- 
tion 1 
of 

Water 
Sur- 
face 


Amount 

Stored 

(Gallons) 


Cochituate Watershed: — 

Lake Cochituate 2 . 
Sudbury Watershed: — 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 

Ashland Reservoir . 

Hopkinton Reservoir . 

Whitehall Reservoir 

Farm Pond .... 
Wachusett Watershed: — 

Wachusett Reservoir . 


144.36 

260.00 
169.32 
177.87 
186.74 
225.21 
305.00 
337.91 
159.25 

395.00 


2,097,100,000 

7,253,500,000 
289,900,0003 
529,900,0003 
1,180,000,0003 
1,416,400,000 
1,520,900,000 
1,256,900,000 
167,500,000 

64,968,000,000 


142.75 

256.30 
167.79 
177.66 
185.23 
224.45 
304.13 
336.66 
159.55 

373.39 


1,718,200,000 

5,730,600,000 

220,000,000 

553,300,000 

1,077,500,000 

1,374,600,000 

1,466,500,000 

1,015,200,000 

183,700,000 

39,594,200,000 


143.70 

257.01 
167.83 
176.08 
18467 
224.51 
304.16 
337.14 
159.49 

363.26 


1,940,600,000 

6,017,600,000 

221,700,000 

485,200,000 

1,032,700,000 

1,377,900,000 

1,468,300,000 

1,107,200,000 

180,500,000 

30,679,200,000 


Totals 


— 


80,680,100,000 


— 


52,933,800,000 


~ 


44,510,900,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

3 Excluding Dudley Pond which was abandoned Apr 3, 1916. 

• To top of flash-boards. 



The table shows the total storage which could be drained from the reservoirs. 
Special provisions would be necessary, however, to draw about 10 billion gallons 
of this storage for consumption, as it is below the outlet channels which can be 
conveniently used for regular service. 



20 P. D. 48 

Wachusett Reservoir 

At the beginning of the year there was 39.6 billion gallons of water stored in 
Wachusett Reservoir, and the surface of the water at elevation 373.39 was 21.61 
feet below designed high-water line, elevation 395. The lowest stage reached in 
the early part of the year was elevation 372.48 on February 14, when there was 38.7 
billion gallons in storage. With the melting of the snow and the spring rains the 
quantity of water in storage reached a maximum for the year of 50 billion gallons 
on May 24, when the reservoir had filled to elevation 383.25 and the water was 11.75 
feet below high-water line. This was the minimum quantity of water stored at 
time of maximum storage for any year since the reservoir first filled, in 1908, and 
was 3.5 billion gallons less than for the maximum stage in 1925. 

From May 24 to November 9 the yield of the watershed was much less than the 
draft for consumption and the water was drawn down to elevation 363.74. From 
November 9 to the end of the year the yield of the watershed was not quite equal 
to the draft and on December 30 and 31, the water was 31.82 feet below high- 
water line at elevation 363.18 and the reservoir contained 30.6 billion gallons, the 
minimum storage since the first filling of the reservoir. On January 1, 1927, the 
water was 0.08 of a foot higher than on December 31, and the loss in storage for 
the year 1926 was 8.915 billion gallons. 

In compliance with General Laws chapter 92, section 14, 626,600,000 gallons 
of water was discharged from the reservoir to maintain a flow in the Nashua River 
below the dam. 

From January 14 to 23, inclusive, on three days in February and March, and 
from June 14 to December 11, inclusive, the town of Clinton pumped 114,400,000 
gallons of water from the Metropolitan supply under the provisions of chapter 
348 of the Acts of 1923. 

The city of Worcester pumped 258,600,000 gallons of water from the reservoir 
from October 4 to November 27, inclusive. 

The fencing of the reservoir lands, begun in 1921, was continued and 4.14 miles 
of fence was constructed during the year, and about 27 miles of fence or 40 per 
cent of the work is now completed* 

The Wachusett Dam and adjacent structures, the exposed reservoir bed and 
marginal lands and departmental buildings thereon have been given the usual 
care, and the repair work in the gate-chamber wells has been completed. The 
motor boat, used on the reservoir since 1907, was replaced with a new boat. The 
barn at the Cook place was struck by lightning and entirely destroyed by fire on 
October 13. 

Sudbury Reservoir and Framingham Reservoir No. 3 

At the beginning of the year the water in Sudbury Reservoir was at elevation 
256.3 and 2.7 feet below the crest of the overflow at the dam. It was kept several 
feet below the crest until August so that repairs could be made at the Southborough 
swimming pool. From August 2 to December 4, while the flash-boards were on 
the overflow, the water was held about one-half a foot above the crest. From 
November 1 to 16, while alterations were being made in the protective equipment 
in the Sudbury Power Station, 236.5 million gallons of water was discharged over 
the crest of the overflow into Framingham Reservoir No. 3 for supplying the 
Sudbury Aqueduct. From December 4 to the end of the year the water in Sud- 
bury Reservoir was held about 3 feet below the crest of the overflow and was at 
elevation 257.01 at the end of the year. 

At Framingham Reservoir No. 3 the flash-boards were kept on the overflow at 
the dam during the entire year. The water in the reservoir was at elevation 185.23 
at the beginning of the year and at elevation 184.67 at the end of the year. 

The total quantity of water stored in these reservoirs at the end of the year 
exceeded the quantity stored at the beginning of the year by 243,800,000 gallons. 

The reservoirs, dams and other structures, the walks, drives and improved 
grounds and outlying reservoir lands received the usual care. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs 

and Farm Pond 
No water was drawn for consumption from the 47 square miles of the Southern 
Sudbury watershed tributary to Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, 



P. D.48 21 

Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs or from Farm Pond. Not less than 1,500,000 
gallons of water a day has been wasted from Framingham Reservoir No. 1 into the 
Sudbury River below Dam No. 1, as required by Acts of 1872, chapter 177. During 
the summer the flow of the river at Dam No. 1 was regulated as closely as possible 
to the minimum rate allowed by law so that the sanitary conditions along the river 
could be carefully investigated under this regulation of the flow in the stream. 

Although the water from this portion of the works has not been used because of 
its poor quality, it has been necessary to employ the regular force to operate the 
waste gates and care for the buildings and grounds at these reservoirs. 

From September 10 to November 12, inclusive, the town of Hopkinton pumped 
666,000 gallons of water from Whitehall Reservoir to supplement its local supply. 

At the close of the year there were on the private lands surrounding Whitehall 
Reservoir 88 camps, and during the summer there were 4 motor boats, 93 row boats 
and 24 canoes in use on the reservoir and fishing in the waters thereof was allowed 
without permit. On November 30 the regulations permitting boating on and fish- 
ing in the reservoir were terminated so that the water would be safe for use in case 
of a shortage of the regular supply. 

Under rights reserved by legislation the Boston & Albany Railroad took approxi- 
mately 73,200,000 gallons of water and the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad took approximately 64,200,000 gallons of water from Farm Pond for use 
in locomotives. 

Lake Cochituate 

The water in Lake Cochituate was maintained near high-water line except in 
February and March, when it was drawn down 3 to 4 feet in anticipation of the 
large yield from the melting snows and spring rains. 

No water was drawn from the lake for consumption during the year but the 
regular force was maintained to operate waste gates and care for the buildings, 
grounds and surface water drains. 

At the close of the year there were on the private lands surrounding the water 
works margins at Lake Cochituate 215 cottages, 66 garages and 4 stables. 

Aqueducts 

The Wachusett, Weston and Sudbury aqueducts were in service and the Cochit- 
uate Aqueduct out of service during the entire year. 

Water was drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir through the Wachusett Aque- 
duct on 293 days. The total quantity of water discharged is 40,649,300,000 
gallons, equivalent to an average of 111,368,000 gallons per day for the entire year, 
and was used to generate electric energy at the power station before being discharged 
into the aqueduct. 

The Westborough State Hospital pumped 81,892,000 gallons of water from the 
aqueduct at the terminal chamber during the year. This is equivalent to a con- 
sumption of 224,400 gallons per day. 

The Weston Aqueduct was used on 358 days and delivered to the Weston Reser- 
voir and Supply Lines 34,455,500,000 gallons of water, an average of 94,398,630 
gallons per day. With the exception of 1,496,300,000 gallons of water by-passed 
around the water wheels from November 1 to 15, inclusive, this water was used for 
generating electric energy. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in continuous use with the exception of two hours, 
from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. December 17, when it was shut off to remove the bulkhead 
from the intake chamber from which the town of Framingham pumped 504,600,000 
gallons of water for its supply. During the year 11,637,700,000 gallons of water, 
an average of 31,884,110 gallons per day, was supplied to Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
through the Sudbury Aqueduct. 

No water was supplied for consumption through the Cochituate Aqueduct, 
which has been drained most of the time for minor repairs. 

Early in the year, 4,785 square feet of Cochituate Aqueduct land, located at the 
junction of Central Street and Linden Street in Wellesley, was sold with a reser- 
vation retaining an easement for the use of the land for water works purposes. 



22 P. D. 48 

The regular maintenance force has cared for the structures and lands along the 
aqueducts in the usual manner. 

Protection of Water Supply 

A sanitary inspector, two watershed inspectors and three watchmen were em- 
ployed throughout the year to inspect the condition of premises on the watersheds 
and ice cutting operations and to prevent pollution of the water in the reservoirs. 

The sewage from the Worcester County Training School in West Boylston was 
purified by filtration throughout the year and the sewage from the summer cottages 
near Gates Terrace, at Sterling Junction, was purified from May 1 to November 
13, inclusive. 

The surface water from the village of Sterling, the brook near Maple Street in 
Marlborough and Pegan Brook in Natick has been purified by filtration with the 
exception of large flows in excess of the capacity of the filters, which was sterilized 
with calcium hyper chlorite. 

The Pegan pumping station was operated on 220 days and 268,913,000 gallons 
of water was pumped to the filters, an average of 736,748 gallons per day for the 
entire year. The cost of operating the station, including the care of the grounds 
and filters, was $6,582.47 for labor, $555.34 for fuel and $1,155.77 for supplies and 
repairs, a total of $8,293.58 and $30.84 per million gallons filtered. The fuel cost 
per million foot gallons was 15.87 cents. 

The cost of protecting the water supply by filtration and chlorination was $944 
on the Wachusett watershed, $4,800 on the Sudbury watershed and about $8,300 
on the Cochituate watershed as given above in detail. 

The usual work of caring for the ditches, culverts and watering places and im- 
proving brook channels was accomplished. 

The cost of maintaining the 37 miles of drainage ditches on all of the watersheds 
was about $9,500, considerable repair work being necessary, and the expenditure for 
the construction of new ditches and improvement of brook channels was about $4,500. 

Early in the year measures were taken to stop bathing in the outlying ponds in 
the Wachusett watershed, which was increasing each year and becoming a menace 
to the purity of the water supply, and especially so on account of the low stage of 
the water in the reservoir. The results of this action were entirely satisfactory. 

Clinton Sewerage Works 

The works for disposing of the sewage of the town of Clinton were operated 
throughout the year as required by Acts of 1898, chapter 557, and 487,674,000 
gallons of sewage was pumped to the filters, an average of 1,336,000 gallons a day. 

The cost of operating the pumping station was $2,848.70 or $5.84 per million 
gallons of sewage pumped, equivalent to 11.7 cents per million foot gallons, about 
36 per cent of the cost being for labor. The cost of operating the filters was 
$9,701.95 or at the rate of $19.89 per million gallons. 

Forestry 

About 24,000 white, red and mugho pine and Norway spruce seedlings 2 to 5 
years old, received from State nurseries, were planted along the open channel of 
the Wachusett Aqueduct in Marlborough and Southborough, on the marginal land 
of the Wachusett Reservoir in West Boylston and the grounds at the dam in 
Clinton. About 1,600 white spruce trees 4 to 6 feet high, from the Wachusett 
Section nursery, were planted on recently drained areas in Boylston and West 
Boylston. 

About 11,500 red pine seedlings, from the Sudbury Section nursery, were set 
out in Southborough and 10,000 red pine and 10,000 white pine seedlings 2 years 
old, received from the State nurseries, were set out in the Sudbury Section nursery. 

About 5,000 Corsican and 10,000 Jack pine seedlings 4 years old, from the State 
nurseries, were set out at Weston Reservoir and 10,000 white pine seedlings, from 
the State nurseries, were set out at Spot Pond. 



P. D. 48 23 

Fire guards and forest roads have been mowed and improvement thinnings and 
clearings have been made about as usual, and considerable work has been done to 
protect the plantings from the pine-tree weevil and trees on selected areas from 

The total expenditure for forestry ^ was $23,480.66, of which $2,967.13 was 
expended for protecting the trees from insects. 

Hydroelectric Service 

During the year 11,280,248 kilowatt hours of electric energy were delivered from 
the hydroelectric stations operated by water drawn from the Wachusett and 
Sudbury reservoirs. 

The total value of this energy at contract prices and including rentals of $182.20 
for transmission line locations is $63,323.15. The total expense charged to opera- 
tion of both stations and transmission lines is $56,740.72, leaving a profit from the 
operation of the stations of $6,582.43, or only $0,583 per thousand kilowatt hours. 
This small profit is due principally to the unusual repairs, costing about $4,800 
on Unit No. 2, and the reduced output at the Wachusett Station on account of the 
low water in the reservoir, and to the reduced output and increased expense of three 
shift operation and of the expenditure of about $1,250 for rearrangement of pro- 
tective apparatus at the Sudbury Station on account of the increased quantity of 
water supplied to the District by gravity through the Weston Aqueduct since the 
completion of the new supply main for the northern low service. 

The Wachusett Power station was operated on 293 days. The statistics for 
the year 1926 are as follows: — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours) 7,155,600 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours) .... 165,718 

Available energy (kilowatt hours) 6,989,882 

Water used (gallons) 40,649,300,000 

Average head (feet) 78.3 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours) . . 2.248 

Efficiency of station (per cent) 71.54 

Credits: 

Energy sold New England Power Company and 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company, 6,794,530 
kilowatt hours at $0.0053 . . . . $36,011.01 

Deduction of 2 per cent as provided in con- 
tract, 135,891 kilowatt hours at $0.0053 720.22 



$35,290.79 



Energy furnished Clinton Sewerage Pumping Station, 

195,352 kilowatt hours at $0.0053 .... 1,035.37 

Rental, transmission line location .... 182.20 $36,508.36 



Charges : 

Superintendence $1,537.74 

Labor, operating station 9,605.31 

Repairs and supplies: 

Power station $6,534.84 

Transmission line 46.57 6,581.41 



$17,724.46 

Taxes 3,000.00 

Administration, general supervision, interest and sink- 
ing fund 11,200.37 31,924.83 



Profit $4,583.53 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours . . . $4,567 



24 

The Sudbury power station was in service on 343 days, 
year 1926 are as follows: — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours) . 
Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours) 

Available energy (kilowatt hours) 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 service: 

Water used (gallons) 

Average head (feet) 

Weston Aqueduct service : 

Water used (gallons) 

Average head (feet) 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours) 

Efficiency of station (per cent) 

Credits: 

Energy sold Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston, 

4,290,366 kilowatt hours at $0.00625 

Charges: 

Superintendence $1,610.44 

Labor, operating station 12,450.72 

Repairs and supplies 2,742.£)8 



P. D. 48 

The statistics for the 



4,349,280 
58,914 

4,290,366 

11,289,800,000 
64.33 

34,455,500,000 
35.71 
2.223 

70.8 



$26,814.79 



_L ct A. vo ••••••■••• 

Administration, general supervision, interest and sink- 
ing fund 

Profit 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours 



$16,803.24 
1,860.00 

6,152.65 



24,815.89 

$1,998.90 

$5,784 



Distribution Pumping Stations 

The total pumpage at the five distribution pumping stations during 1926 was 
25.087 billion gallons or 9.792 billion gallons less than in 1925. This reduction of 
nearly 27 million gallons a day resulted from supplying most of the Northern Low 
Service District by gravity through the new Weston Aqueduct Supply Main. 

At the beginning of the year there was 1,800 net tons of bituminous coal and 80 
tons of anthracite screenings on hand at the pumping stations. During the year 
8,500 tons of bituminous coal and 480 tons of anthracite screenings were received. 
At the close of the year there was 1,085 tons of bituminous coal and 75 tons of 
anthracite screenings on hand. 

At Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1, Engine No. 16 was operated continu- 
ously with the exception of a few short interruptions for repairs and pumped nearly 
all of the water. The dependent boiler feed pump on the engine was entirely 
rebuilt and now operates satisfactorily. Extensive repairs were made on Engine 
No. 3 and the electric lighting engine and independent boiler feed pump at this 
station were thoroughly overhauled. The boilers were washed out and inspected 
regularly and new non-automatic water glass fittings were installed, grates were 
repaired, seats and discs of blow-down valves were renewed, stop valves were 
repacked, the economizer was bored out and washed down and a new gallery was 
erected from which to blow the bottom headers with compressed air. 

At Chestnut Hill Station No. 2, Engine No. 12 was operated continuously 
during the year except when shut down for occasional ordinary repairs and for the 
installation of a new dependent triplex boiler feed pump in place of the old single 
acting pump that was attached to the engine when installed and which caused 
objectionable water ram and prevented accurate registration of the Venturi feed- 
water meter. The new arrangement has given perfect satisfaction. The governor 
of Engine No. 5 was thoroughly overhauled. The boilers and economizers at this 
station were kept in first class condition; 16 broken solid stay bolts in boiler No. 
16 were replaced with Tate flexible stay bolts and a door was installed in the flue 
from boilers Nos. 5, 6 and 7 to facilitate the removal of the soot. The boiler room 
drain was extended 377 feet with 8-inch cast-iron pipe to obtain a free outlet. 



P. D. 48 25 

The blacksmithing, carpentry and machinists' work for all of the pumping sta- 
tions has been done at the Chestnut Hill shops and considerable work of this 
nature has also been done at these shops for the other sections of the Water Division. 

At Spot Pond Station the new engine, No. 17, was put into regular service, 
necessary repairs were made on engines Nos. 8 and 9, and new non-automatic 
water gages were installed on the boilers which have been regularly maintained and 
inspected. A new floor was laid in the coal shed. 

Some repairs have been made on Engine No. 10 at the Arlington Station and on 
Engine No. 14 at the Hyde Park Station, and the boilers at both of these stations 
have been maintained in the usual manner. 

The engine duties at the various stations, based on plunger displacement and 
including the coal used in generating the steam for heating and lighting the stations 
were as follows : — 

Chestnut Hill Station No. 1, 127,112,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed 
coal averaging 14,550 British thermal units per pound. 

Chestnut Hill Station No. 2, 140,219,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed 
coal averaging 14,495 British thermal units per pound. 

Spot Pond Station, 115,882,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of bituminous coal 
averaging 14,570 British thermal units per pound. 

Arlington Station, 71,456,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed coal averaging 
13,750 British thermal units per pound. 

Hyde Park Station, 63,553,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed coal averag- 
ing 13,700 British thermal units per pound. 

Distribution Reservoirs 
The locations, elevations, and capacities of the distribution reservoirs of the 
Metropolitan Water Works are shown by the following table: — 



Distribution Reservoirs and Locations 


Elevation of 
High Water* 


Capacity in 
Gallons 


Low Service: 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton district of Boston 

Northern High Service: 

Northern Extra High Service: 
Southern High Service: 

Southern Extra High Service: 

Bellevue Reservoir, steel tank, West Roxbury district of Boston . 


163.00 
134.00 
200.00 
157.00 

271.00 
300.00 

442.50 

251.00 
264.50 
192.00 
251.00 

375.00 


1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

26,200,000 

41,400,000 
2,450,000 

2,000,000 

15,500,000 

13,500,000 

5,100,000 

330,000 

2,500,000 


Total 


— 


2,400,680,000 



Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 



By arrangement with the city of Chelsea a portion of the maintenance of its 
reservoir on Powder Horn Hill is assumed by the Metropolitan Water Works, 
and the reservoir is used when necessary in connection with the northern high- 
service supply. This reservoir has a capacity of 1,000,000 gallons with high-water 
line at elevation 196.6. The reservoir was in service from January 1 to March 29 
and from December 9 to the end of the year, and was kept full of water for emer- 
gency use the remainder of the time. 

The city of Maiden's standpipe on Waitt's Mount was under the control of the 
Division and kept full of water for emergency use until the new duplicate northern 
high-service pipe line from Fetls Reservoir to Pleasant Street, in Maiden, was put 
into regular service. On November 20 the standpipe was turned back to the city 
and its use by the Water Division was terminated. 

The tower surrounding the City of Boston's Orient Heights standpipe in East 
Boston was burned June 13, and on June 18 the standpipe was shut off and has 
been out of service ever since, with the Orient Heights district entirely dependent 
upon a single Metropolitan supply main extending back about 2^ miles to the 
duplicate mains in Fenno Street at Broadway, Revere. 



26 P. D. 48 

The Weston Reservoir was in continuous use during the year and was maintained 
in the usual manner by the regular force of a subforeman and 3 laborers, which 
has operated the screens and gates and cared for the grounds and drainage ditches 
including about a mile of aqueduct extending below the reservoir to the terminal 
chamber, where the supply mains begin. 

The Chestnut Hill Reservoir has been maintained as usual. , The Bradlee Basin 
was in continuous service. The Lawrence Basin was in service from April 27 
to July 24, and from September 28 to the close of the year. In January the 
sluice gates in the intermediate gate chamber were equipped with new rustless 
steel stems, as the old stems installed in 1868 when the gate chamber was con- 
structed having been weakened by corrosion were unreliable. 

April 18 a 7-passenger touring car occupied by 4 men was driven into Bradlee 
Basin by the owner who was learning to drive. The men were rescued by Metro- 
politan District police officers, who also removed the car from the reservoir. 

In June many dead fish were removed from the reservoir but the cause of their 
death was not discovered. 

During a heavy rain July 24 the drain on the northeasterly side of Lawrence 
Basin became clogged and surface water overflowed into the reservoir. 

About 1,200 ducks and 700 gulls came to the reservoirs during the year and 
about 500 shots were fired to drive them away. 

The Water Division paid the Park Division $5,728.80 for policing at Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir. 

The walk around the reservoir was resurfaced with stone dust for a length of 
3,300 feet, the riprap slopes of the basins and the driveways were repaired and 
grass land and shrubbery were cared for as usual. 

The Fisher Hill and Waban Hill reservoirs, located near the Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir, have been maintained by the Chestnut Hill force. Both of these reser- 
voirs have been in continuous service. The work of enclosing the Fisher Hill 
Reservoir lot by a fence was begun in November and the reinforced concrete posts 
have been set for a distance of about 400 feet on the westerly side. 

Spot Pond and the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs have been maintained in the 
usual manner by a subforeman and 7 laborers. The screens and gates at these 
reservoirs have been operated as required and temporary screen grooves were 
installed in the Fells Reservoir gate-house at the inlet to the new 38-inch main. 

Some grading was done at Spot Pond at the beach at Woodland Road, to keep 
the street drainage out of the pond. About 5,500 ducks and 1,700 gulls came to 
the pond during the year. They were driven off by firing gun shots without 
attempting to kill them. 

The Water Division paid the Park Division $1,155.14 for policing the Water 
Works lands at these reservoirs. 

The Mystic Reservoir, which is about 10 feet below the hydraulic grade main- 
tained on the northern low-service pipe lines connecting with the reservoir, was 
kept ready for emergency use throughout the year. The granite and brick masonry 
on the northerly, southerly and easterly inside slopes of the reservoir was repointed, 
some resurfacing was done on the roadway around the reservoir and the gate-house 
was painted. On July 8 Michael S. Donahue, 8 years of age, of Somerville, climbed 
over the guard fence which surrounds the reservoir and was drowned. 

At the Arlington and Bellevue reservoirs the usual care has been taken of the 
masonry towers, steel tanks and surrounding grounds. 

The tower at Arlington was open to visitors, under the supervision of the Park 
Division, on Sundays and holidays during pleasant weather from July 18 to Octo- 
ber 24, inclusive, and the Bellevue tower was open on Sundays and holidays from 
January 3 to November 28, inclusive. 

Distribution Pipe Lines 

The last section of the new Weston Aqueduct supply main, 60 inches in diameter, 
extending from Arlington Center to Boston Avenue at the Medford-Somerville 
boundary line, and the new low-service main, 48 inches in diameter, extending 
from this point through Boston Avenue to the 48-inch low-service main in College 
Avenue, were put into service February 15. 



P. D. 48 27 

On April 10 the 36-inch connection between the new supply main and the old 
30-inch Mystic mains was put into service. These Mystic mains, extending about 
3,000 feet easterly from this connection to the Mystic River, were cleaned for a total 
length of 5,354 feet under the contract made in 1925 with the National Water 
Main Cleaning Company. One of these old mains was laid to the reservoir only 
in 1864; the other, laid in 1878, was connected with the 24-inch and 30-inch supply 
mains that extend easterly from the reservoir to Charlestown. The force main 
laid in 1864, as far as the reservoir only, has been extended about 429 feet and 
connected with the Charlestown supply mains, and since June 14 water has been 
supplied through both of these old Mystic mains from the new supply main. The 
new Weston Aqueduct supply line has been in full operation with gates wide open 
since July 9, delivering from 33 to 37 million gallons of water daily, according to 
the requirements of the service. 

On July 20 a contract was made with the C. & R. Construction Company for 
furnishing and laying 16-inch and 20-inch and relaying 12-inch cast-iron pipes in 
Lynn for maintaining the northern high-service supply for Nahant and Swampscott. 
Most of this pipe was lined with cement at the foundry by the centrifugal process. 
Under this contract 2,229 feet of 20-inch, 1,828 feet of 16-inch and 627 feet of 12- 
inch pipes were laid. The new lines were connected with the existing lines by the 
Water Division maintenance force. The new 16-inch and 20-inch lines were put 
into service October 22 and the portion of the existing 12-inch lines in Washington 
Street that had become unsafe on account of damage by electrolysis was relaid 
between October 22 and November 9. 

During the year the 6-inch blow-off lines from the 20-inch northern high-service 
main laid in 1922 across the Mystic River near Combination Park, in Medford, 
were extended 24 feet on the north bank in Somerville and 12 feet on the south bank 
in Medford to carry them beyond the mud flats. The easterly 20-inch southern 
high-service main to Watertown was raised for a distance of 220 feet between Lake 
Street and Washington Street, in Brighton, to provide for the construction of a 
sewer. 

A 16-inch by-pass was laid around the southern high-service connection with the 
city of Quincy pipes in Beal Street at Summit Avenue, and a capped blow-off from 
the southern high-service 36-inch main in Morton Street, near the old entrance to 
Franklin Park, was extended and connected with a new drain built at this place. 

On June 3 the pressure on the southern extra high-service line supplying the 
higher districts in Milton and Hyde Park was increased by shutting the section of 
20-inch pipe line in Hyde Park Avenue south of the pumping station off from the 
southern high service and using it as a part of the southern extra high-service 
system. 

In the latter part of the year a 20-inch connection was made from the Metro- 
politan 48-inch main in the Fellsway to the Somerville water main in Middle- 
sex Avenue near the new Ford Motor Company plant. A 20-inch Venturi meter 
with 53^-inch throat and a 12-inch by-pass were installed on this connection, which 
was paid for by the city of Somerville but had not been put into service at the end 
of the year. 

During the year four breaks occurred in the Distribution Section pipe lines, two 
of which were caused by contractors blasting operations. January 6 a break 
occurred in the 12-inch northern high-service pipe line in Washington Street at 
Farrar Street in Lynn, which was caused by electrolysis; the cost of repairs was 
$187.68. January 17 the 36-inch southern high-service main in Morton Street 
at Canterbury Street in West Roxbury was broken by a contractor blasting near 
the pipe line; the cost of repairs was $675.91. April 20 the 36-inch northern high- 
service main in the Fells Reservation was broken by the contractor laying the new 
line at a point about 800 feet below the Fells Reservoir; the cost of repairs, which 
was paid by the contractor in this case, was $518.81. September 20 a break 
occurred in the 48-inch Weston Aqueduct supply main in Commonwealth Avenue 
at Auburn Street in Newton, which flooded the street and low land and house 
cellars in the vicinity, doing considerable damage to private property; the cost of 
repairing this break and the streets was $4,758.84. 

During the year 56 joint leaks were repaired in cast-iron pipe lines, of which 46 
were of lead, 9 were of wooden staves and 1 was of lead hydrotite. Repairs were 



28 P. D. 48 

also made of 2 joint leaks in Calomine pipe and of 4 leaks in lead service pipes. 
The total cost of repairing these leaks was $9,079.19, of which $4,846.53 was for 
10 flexible joints in the older 12-inch southern extra high-service line under the 
Neponset River in Hyde Park. An attempt to repair these leaks with diving 
equipment between January 25 and March 9 was a failure, but the work was suc- 
cessfully accomplished between April 27 and June 4 with diving and dredging 
equipment and the use of special clamps to hold the pipes securely in position at 5 
flexible joints that were damaged by the dredging of the river in 1915. 

The cost of repairing a single lead joint leak in the 36-inch southern high-service 
line in Morton Street near the Forest Avenue Railroad Station, was $1,709.87. 
This was an unusually troublesome and expensive leak. Early in the year the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad officials complained of an accumula- 
tion of water on the roadbed where the pipe line crosses under the tracks. A 
careful search for a leak was made at that time without finding any trouble; later, 
the Railroad Company laid a drain to carry off the water, and in connection with 
this work further investigations were made along the pipe line and the leak was 
located under the sidewalk in Morton Street, 140 feet west of the railroad tracks 
and at a point where the pipe was buried 15 feet below the surface of the ground, 
and repairs were completed July 1. 

In connection with the rebuilding of the Chestnut Hill Avenue bridge over the 
Boston & Albany Railroad, the pipe box enclosing the 30-inch southern high-service 
force main was removed and the pipe line was shut off and drained to facilitate the 
work of erecting the new steel highway bridge. 

The pipe box enclosing and supporting the 30-inch low-service pipe line at the 
Chelsea North Bridge over the Mystic River was rebuilt for a distance of 251 feet. 

The tops of the boxes enclosing the 16-inch northern high-service pipe line in 
Broadway, at the Pines River crossings in Revere and Saugus, were rebuilt in 
connection with the rebuilding of the main bridge. 

A 48-inch by 223^-inch Venturi meter was installed on the new Weston Aqueduct 
supply main just west of the connection between this main and the Mystic mains in 
Somerville. A 20-inch by 5j^-inch Venturi meter was installed on the connection 
with the Somerville pipes in Fellsway at Middlesex Avenue. A 20-inch by 534- 
inch Venturi meter, formerly used for measuring the supply to Arlington, was 
removed from Medford Street at Parallel Street and after it was thoroughly over- 
hauled it was installed on the connection with the Somerville pipes at the junction 
of Mystic Valley and Alewife Brook parkways. The 16-inch by 6.005-inch Ven- 
turi meter on Beal Street at Summit Avenue, in Quincy, was replaced with a 16- 
inch by 8-inch meter. 

There are now 76 Venturi meters from 6 to 60 inches in diameter in the distri- 
bution pipe lines. Sixty-four of these are on connections supplying various towns 
in the Metropolitan Water District, 4 on Weston Aqueduct supply mains, 1 each 
at the Hyde Park, Spot Pond and Arlington pumping stations and on emergency 
connections to Cambridge, Newton and Wakefield, 1 between the Fisher Hill 
force main and the Spot Pond mains, and 1 on the Clinton Road line in front of 
effluent gate-house No. 1 at Chestnut Hill Reservoir. A 12-inch by 6-inch Hersey 
detector meter was installed on the southern extra high-service connection to Milton 
on Metropolitan Avenue and put into service on June 25. 

The 9 pressure regulating valves in the distribution mains, for reducing the 
pressure of the water supplied to Nahant, Revere, Swampscott and Winthrop, and 
to portions of Chelsea, East Boston and Hyde Park have given satisfactory service. 

Recording pressure gages have been maintained at 24 stations on the distribution 
system and tables in the Appendix show the hydraulic grade at 18 of these stations 
as determined from the charts. 

Pipes, specials and other materials and supplies required for maintaining and 
operating the pipe lines have been kept on hand at the Glenwood pipe yard in 
Medford and at the Chestnut Hill pipe yard in Brighton, and an auto truck equipped 
with a gate-operating attachment has been stationed at each yard, with men on 
duty ready to operate them in case of emergency any time during the day or night. 
A third auto truck, equipped with gate-operating attachment, has also been main- 
tained for relief service in case either of the other trucks is out of commission for 
any reason. 



P. D. 48 



Consumption of Water 



29 



During the year 47,517,455,000 gallons of water were furnished from the Metro- 
politan Water Works to the 18 cities and towns supplied. This is equivalent to an 
average daily consumption of 130,184,800 gallons and for the estimated population 
of 1,326,080 is at the rate of 98.2 gallons per capita, very nearly the same as in 
1925. 

The town of Brookline and the city of Newton were supplied from their local 
sources, with the exception that the city of Newton was supplied with 325,339,000 
gallons of water from the Metropolitan supply through the emergency connection 
on Ward Street. Including this water the average daily consumption in these 
municipalities was as follows : — 



Brookline 
Newton 



Estimated 
Population 

43,740 
54,660 



Average 
Gallons 

4,212,500 
4,252,800 



Daily Consump- 
tion Gallons per 
Capita 
96 

78 



The total consumption of the town of Brookline was 1,537,554,000 gallons, of 
which 308,141,000 gallons was supplied from elevation 375 and 1,229,413,000 
gallons was supplied from elevation 250. 

Under special arrangements the city of Quincy supplied 14,531,000 gallons of 
water to the United States Government Reservation on Peddock's Island and 
556,000 gallons to the town of Braintree, and the town of Arlington supplied 
692,000 gallons to the town of Winchester. 

The population, consumption of water and per cent of services metered 
in the Metropolitan Water District as supplied in 1926, and for the period 
from 1890 to 1926, inclusive, are shown graphically by the accompanying 
diagram. 

The average daily consumption of water in each of the municipalities in the 
Metropolitan Water District during 1925 and 1926, is as follows: — 











Estimated 


Average Daily Consumption 




1925 


192^ 






Popula- 
tion, 1926 










Increase 




Gallons 


Gallons 
per Capita 


Gallons 


Gallons 
per Capita 


in 
Gallons 


Arlington . 


26,090 


1,576,400 


62 


1,504,400 


58 


72,0001 


Belmont 








16,080 


1,047,600 


68 


1,056,900 


66 


9,300 


Boston 








789,500 


89,724,700 


115 


91,275,700 


116 


1,551,000 


Chelsea 








47,950 


3,660,400 


77 


3,474,400 


72 


186,0001 


Everett 








42,440 


5,281,000 


125 


5,215,900 


123 


65,100» 


Lexington 








8,040 


492,900 


63 


517,000 


64 


24,100 


Maiden 








52,340 


2,968,400 


57 


3,139,800 


60 


171,400 


Medford 








49,430 


2,507,600 


52 


2,522,400 


51 


14,800 


Melrose 








20,610 


1,253,800 


62 


1,379,600 


67 


125,800 


Milton 








13,420 


604,000 


46 


701,600 


52 


97,600 


Nahant 








1,670 


176,000 


107 


178,200 


107 


2,200 


Quincy 








62,510 


4,478,200 


74 


4,757,000 


76 


278,800 


Revere 








34,240 


2,377,900 


71 


2,263,800 


66 


114.1001 


Somerville 






100,460 


7,955,500 


80 


7,791,000 


78 


164,5001 


Stoneham . 






9,310 


574,000 


63 


560,000 


60 


14.000« 


Swampscott 






9,110 


753,900 


84 


720,800 


78 


33,1001 


Watertown 






26,330 


1,887,500 


74 


2,059,300 


78 


171,800 


Winthrop . 






16,550 


1,030,000 


64 


1,067,000 


64 


37,000 


Dist. Supplied 


1,326,080 


128,349,800 


98 


130,184,800 


98 


1,835,000 


Brookline . 






43,740 


4,068,700 


95 


4,212,500 


96 


143,800 


Newton 






54,660 


4,181,800 


78 


4,252,800 


78 


71,000 


Total Die 


trict 






1,424,480 


136,600,300 


97 


138,650,100 


97 


2,049.800 




Decrease. 



30 



The consumption by districts in 1926 as compared with 1925 is as follows: — 



P. D. 48 





Gallons 

per Day 

1926 


Increase from 1925 




Gallons 
per Day 


Percent- 
age 


Low-service district, embracing the low-service districts of 
Arlington, Belmont, Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and Water- 
town, the high-service district of Boston except Breed's 
Island, and portions of Belmont and Milton 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Nahant, 
Revere, Stoneham, Swampscott, Winthrop and Breed's 
Island and the high-service districts of Chelsea, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford and Somerville 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher 
portions of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington, 
and the higher portions of Arlington and Belmont 


71,975,200 
44,688,900 

11,061,200 
1,205,100 
1,254,400 


1,264,100 
406,500 

11,3001 

194,300 

18,6001 


1.79 
0.92 

0.10» 
19.22 
1.461 


Supplied from local sources, Brookline and Newton 


130,184,800 
8,465,300 


1,835,000 
214,800 


1.43 
2.60 




138,650,100 


2,049,800 


1.50 



1 Decrease. 

Through the emergency connection on Ward Street near Hammond Street, 
water was furnished to the city of Newton every month in the year, the total 
quantity supplied being 325,339,000 gallons or 311,839,000 gallons in excess of 
the quantity the city is entitled to take free of charge under the agreement made in 
1900, when the Waban Hill Reservoir was purchased from the city, and for this 
water the city will pay the sum of $21,214.41 



Water from Metropolitan Water Works Sources used Outside of the 

Metropolitan Water District 



Places Supplied 



Town of Rutland .... 

Town of Holden .... 

City of Worcester .... 

Town of Clinton .... 

Westborough State Hospital 

Town of Westborough . 

Town of Hopkinton 

Town of Ashland .... 

Town of Framingham . 

Town of Natick .... 

United States Army Reservation at 

Peddock's Island in Hull . 
Portion of Town of Braintree 
Portion of Town of Winchester . 



Total 
Quantity 
(Gallons) 



77,000,000* 
27,000,000 b 
258,600,000 
114,400,000 
81,892,000 
22,906,427 
666,000 b 
73,000,000 b 
504,527,287 
243,750,000 

14,531,000° 
556,000d 
692,000 e 



Average 
Quantity 
(Gallons 
per Day) 



211,000 

74,000 

708,500 

313,400 

224,400 

62,800 

1,800 

200,000 

1,382,300 

667,800 

31,600 
1,500 
1,900 



Amount 
Charged 



$10,344.00 
2,456.76 

20,181.09 
949.17 



Note: — Water is used throughout the year in all places except City of Worcester, which took water 
from the Metropolitan sources on only 55 days, Town of Clinton on 194 days, and Town of Hopkinton on 
27 days. Average daily use is in all cases figured on basis of 365 days. 

'33,500,000 gallons not diverted. 

b Not diverted from watersheds. 

"The city of Quincy supplies the water at regular rates and turns over one-half of the receipts to 
the Commonwealth. 

d The city of Quincy supplies the water at regular rates and pays the Commonwealth by an addition 
to its regular apportionment. 

•The town of Arlington supplies the water at regular rates and pays the Commonwealth by an addition 
to its regular apportionment. 



P. D. 48 31 

Information regarding the installation of meters on service pipes by the munici- 
palities supplied with water from the Metropolitan Water Works and statistics 
relating to the operation of the Metropolitan Water Works for the year 1926 are 
given in tables in the Appendix. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. FOSS, Director and Chief Engineer. 
Boston, January 2, 1927. 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR AND CHIEF ENGINEER 

OF SEWERAGE DIVISION 

Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Dear Sir: — The following report of the operations of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works for the year ending December 31, 1926, is respectfully 
submitted: — 

Organization 

The Director and Chief Engineer has charge of the design and construction 
of all new works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the works 
controlled by the Metropolitan District Commission for removing sewage from 
the twenty-seven municipalities which comprise the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Districts, 

The following assistants have been employed during the year: — 

Henry T. Stiff, Senior Assistant Engineer, in charge of office and drafting room 
and of the construction work. 

Charles F. Fitz, Assistant Engineer, in charge of maintenance studies and of 
maintenance construction work on the North Metropolitan System. 

Ralph W. Loud, Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey work and field work 
in connection with the Mill Brook Valley Sewer construction and Belmont Relief 
Sewer construction. 

Thomas L. Whelan, Superintendent, North Metropolitan Sewerage District, 
was retired June 30, 1926. 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, Superintendent, South Metropolitan Sewerage District, 
was transferred to the North Metropolitan Sewerage District, July 1, 1926. 

Frank B. Williams was appointed Superintendent of the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage District, July 1, 1926. 

In addition to the above, the maximum number of engineering and other assist- 
ants employed during the year was 15, which includes 3 instrumentmen, 2 inspectors, 
1 draftsman, 7 rodmen and engineering assistants and 2 stenographers. 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS 

Areas and Populations 

During the year the Sewerage System of Needham has been connected with the 
Metropolitan Sewers and that town is now a part of the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage District. This makes twenty-seven municipalities now within the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. 



32 



P. D. 48 



The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, are based on the 
census of 1925. 

Table showing Ultimate Contributing Areas and Present Estimated Populations 
within the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, as of December 81, 1926 







Area (Square 


Estimated 




City or Town 


Miles) 


Population 




Arlington 


5.20 


26,520 




Belmont 








4.66 


16,380 




Boston (portions of) 








3.45 


105,110 


H 


Cambridge 








6.11 


123,100 


H 

c3 


Chelsea 








2.24 


48,210 




Everett 








3.34 


42,570 




Lexington 1 








5.11 


5,250 




Maiden 








5.07 


52,550 


o> to . 


Medford . 
Melrose 








8.35 
3.73 


50,130 
20,780 




Reading 








9.82 


9,050 


o 


Revere 








5.86 


34,620 


Somerville . 








3.96 


101,020 




Stoneham . 








5.50 


9,400 




Wakefield . 








7.65 


16,040 




Winchester . . 








5.95 


11,880 




Winthrop . 








1.61 


16,730 




v Woburn 








12.71 


18,770 










inn po 


709 110 




1UU.OA 


/ UOjllU 


d 


Boston (portions of) 






24.96 


314,990 


03 


Brookline . 






6.81 


44,140 




Dedham 1 . 










9.40 


13,800 




Milton 










12.59 


13,620 


f-t ..-1 


Newton 










16.88 


55,330 




Quincy 










12.56 


63,450 




Waltham . 










13.63 


35,550 


-** 
•3 


Watertown 










4.04 


26,670 


,/. 


Wellesley . 
k Needham . 










9.89 
12.50 


9,430 
9,350 






123.26 


586,330 




Totals . 










223.58 


1,294,440 



'Part of Town 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS 



Sewers Purchased and Constructed and Their Connections 



During the year there have been 1.615 miles of Metropolitan sewers built within 
the sewerage districts, so that there are now 122.970 miles of Metropolitan sewers* 
Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, with the Quincy Pumping Station, have been 
purchased from cities and towns of the districts. The remaining 113.328 miles of 
sewers and other works have been constructed by the Metropolitan Boards. 



P. D. 48 



33 



The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the following tables, 
together with other data referring to the public and special connections with the 
systems: — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System 



Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 







03 

4> 


nnec- 

ecem- 

1926 


Special Connections 


1 






3 












City or Town 


Size of Sewers 


a 


$&~ 




.as 






43 


si n 


Character or Location of 


$* 






to 

a 

4) 


3.2 S3 

3 -** J2 


Connection 








N-3 


£ 




i° 


Boston: — 












Deer Island . 


4'0"to9'0" . 


1.653 


4 

[ 


Shoe factory. 


i 


East Boston 


9'0"tol'0" . 


5.467 


25 j 


Middlebrook Wool-combing 
Co 


i 


Charlestown 


6' 7" x 7' 5" to l'O" 


3.292 


15 j 


Navy Yard .... 
Private Building 


9 

1 








' 


Club House .... 


1 


Winthrop . 


*7 \J • • • • « 


2.864 


14 • 


Fire department station . 


1 








i 


Private building . 

Rendering Works 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 
1 
1 


Chelsea 


8' 4" x 9' 2" to 15" . . 


5.230 


14 


blow-off .... 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
offs 

Naval Hospital . 

U. S. Lighthouse Service . 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off .... 

Cameron Appliance Co. 

Shultz-Goodwin Co. . 


1 

2 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 


Everett 


8'2"x8'10" to 4'8"x5'l" 


2.925 


9 


Andre ws-Wasgatt Co. 
National Metallic Bed Co. 

Linoide Co 

Factory .... 


1 
1 

1 
2 










New England Structural Co. 


1 


Lexington 1 


1 ■"■"" 


^^ 


f 


Metropolitan Water Works 


1 


Maiden 


4' 6" x 4' 10" to 1' 0" 


5.8441 


35 < 


blow-off .... 


1 








i 

> 

1 


Private buildings . 


226* 








Private buildings . 


130* 


Melrose 


4' 6" x 4' 10" to 10" 


6.0993 


40 j 


Factory .... 
Railroad station . 


1 
1 








i 


Park Department bath-house 
Harvard dormitories . 
Slaughterhouse . 
City Hospital 


1 
2 
1 
3 


Cambridge 


5' 2" x 5' 9" to 1' 3" . 


7.209 


49 ' 


Street Railway machine shop 
Private building . 
Factory building 


1 
1 

1 



1 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

* Mostly buildings connected with sewers formerly belonging to city of Maiden but later purchased 
by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 215 of the Acts of 1898 and by 
the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board in accordance with Chapter 512 of the Acts of 1911 and 
made parts of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

1 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

4 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the city of Melrose but later purchased 
byjthe Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 414 of the Acts of 1896 and with 
a sewer extension built in accordance with Chapter 436 of the Acts of 1897 by the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission as an outlet for part of the town of Stoneham and made parts of the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage System. 

The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Lexington. 



34 



P. D. 48 
North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 







03 

3 


■ i 


Special Connections 






a 


a fiSS 










5 <D© 




C Q 


City or Town 


Size of Sewers 


■M 


o -£ 




.-, o 






*3 




Character or Location of 








bo 

a 

3 

h5 




Connection 


Numb 
Open 








■ 


Tannery .... 
Slaughterhouses (3) 
Carhouse .... 
Somerville Water Works blow- 


1 
1 
1 


Somerville . 


6' 5" x V 2" to 10" 


3.577 


15 • 


off 

Street railway power house 

Stable 

Rendering works 
Railroad scale pit 
Private building . 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 








■ 


Armory building 


1 


Medford . 


4' 8" x 5' 1" to 10" 


6.326 


26 • 


Private buildings. 

Stable 

Police substation. 


9 
1 
1 










Tanneries .... 
Private buildings. 
Gelatine factory . 
Watch-hand factory . 
Stable 


6 

10 
1 

1 
1 


Winchester 


4' 6" to 1'3" . 


10.420 


31 ■ 


Railroad station . 
Felt works .... 
Town Hall .... 
Bay State Saw & Tool Co. 
Whitney Machine Co. 
Metropolitan Sewerage Divi- 


2 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 


Stoneham . 


1' 8" to 10" . 


2.333 


6 


— — 


— 


Woburn . 


2' 6" x 2' 7" to 1' 3" . 


1.186 


«{ 


Glue factory. 

Private buildings ... 


4 
1 










Private buildings. 


196* 


Arlington . 


3'0"x3'6"to 10". 


5.794 1 


58 


Railroad station . 


1 








Car house .... 


3 








Post office .... 


1 


Belmont* . 


— — 


— 


4 


— — 


— 


Wakefield . 


3' 0" to 2' 0" x 2' 3" . 


0.703 


1 


— — 


— 


Revere 


4' 0" to 15" . 


0.136 


3 


— — 


— 


Reading . 




0.055 


1 




— 




71.113* 


354 


653 



1 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

* Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the town of Arlington but later pur- 
chased by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897 
and made a part of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

' The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Belmont. 

4 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic Valley Sewer in Medford and Winchester, running parallel with the 
Metropolitan Sewer. 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 





Size of Sewers 


TO 

A 

a 

h3 


Public Connec- 
tions, Decem- 
ber 31, 1926 


Special Connections 


Citt or Town 


Character or Location of 
Connection 


Number in 
Operation 


Boston : — 
Back Bay 

Brighton . 


6' 6" to 3' 9" . 

5' 9" x 6' 0" to 12". 


1.5001 
6.0102 


16 { 
15 { 


Tufts Medical School 

Private house 

Administration Building, Bos- 
ton Park Department 

Simmons College Buildings 

Art Museum 

Prince District Elementary 
School .... 

Private buildings. 

Abattoir .... 


3 



1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

1 Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also .026 of 
a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



P. D. 48 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 



35 







01 


1 1 


Special Connections 






Size of Sewers 


•»4 

d 

*f4 


Connei 
Decen 
, 1926 






Citt or Town 












2 ™ n 


Character or Location of 


£"5 






BO 

a 


•9 o fe 


Connection 


a <u 








£** 




3 a 
SO 








f 


Chocolate works . 
Machine shop 


2 
1 


Dorchester 


3' x 4' to 2' 6" x 2' 7" . 


2.8701 


14 -1 


Paper Mill .... 

Private buildings. 

Edison Electric Company Sta- 


1 
3 

1 








f 


Mattapan Paper Mills 


2 


Hyde Park 


10'7"xll'7" to4'0"x4'l" 


4.527 


19 i 


Private buildings. 


2 








Fairview Cemetery buildings 


1 


Roxbury . 


6' 6" x V to 4' 0" . 


1.430 




— — 


— 










Caledonia Grove buildings 


1 


West Roxbury 


9' 3" x 10' 2" to 12" 


7.643 


17 ■ 


Parental School . 

Lutheran Evangelical Church 


1 
1 










Private buildings . 


6 


Brookline . 


6' 6" x 7' 0" to 8" . 


2.540 2 


14 


Private buildings . 


2 


Dedham . 


4' x 4' 1" to 2' 9" x 3' r 


5.012 


•{ 


Private buildings . 
Dedham Carpet Mills 


2 
1 


Hull* . 


60" pipe .... 


0.750 


— 


— — 


— 


Milton 


11' x 12' to 8" 


3.600 


26 


Private buildings . 


3 


Newton 


4' 2" x 4' 9" to 1' 3" . 


2.911 


10 
[ 


Private houses 
Metropolitan Water Works 


13 


Quincy 


ll'3"x 12'6" to 24" pipe 


7.392 


19 { 


blow-off .... 


1 








Squantum schoolhouse 


1 


Waltham . 


3'6"x4'0" . 


0.001 


1 

f 


Factories .... 


2 


Watertown 


4' 2" x 4' 9" to 12" . 


0.750* 


7 I 


Stanley Motor Carriage Co. 
Knights of Pythias building . 


1 
1 


Needham . 


2'0" x 2'3" to 2'3" x 2'6" 


4.921 


»{ 


Walker-Gordon Co. . 
Private buildings . 


1 

1 


VVellesley* 




' 


1 




^ "•■ 




51.857 


168 


62 



1 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

1 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 

1 Hull is not a part of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

4 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

* The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Wellesley. 

North Metropolitan Sewerage District 



Area 

(Square 
Miles) 



100.32 



Estimated 

Total 
Population 



708,110 



Miles of 

Local Sewer 

Connected 



876.97 



Estimated 

Population 

Contributing 

Sewage 



655,520 



Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 

Population 

(Per cent) 



92.6 



Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers 



Public 



354 



Special 



653 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District 



123.26 



586,330 



792.98 



463,170 



79.0 



168 



62 



Both Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 



223.58 



1,294,440 



1,669.95 



1,118,690 



86.4 



522 



715 



Of the estimated gross population of 1,294,440 on December 31, 1926, 1,118,690, 
representing 86.4 per cent, were on that date contributing sewage to the Metropoli- 
tan sewers, through a total length of 1,669.95 miles of local sewers owned by the 
individual cities and towns of the districts. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan Systems by 522 public and 
715 special connections. During the current year there has been an increase of 



36 P. D. 48 

47.77 miles of local sewers connected with the Metropolitan Systems, and 15 
public and 24 special connections have been added. 

CONSTRUCTION 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer-Arlington 
Chapter 65, Resolves of 1923, authorized a survey and study for a sewer in Mill 
Brook Valley, Arlington, in accordance with the requirements of Chapter 520, 
Acts of 1897. Chapter 116, Acts of 1924, authorized the construction of this work. 
This sewer will extend from West Medford at Warren Street through public streets 
and private lands to Forest Street in Arlington. It will be divided into four sec- 
tions, 80, 79, 78 and 77. The lower section, numbered 77, was completed during 
1925. 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer - Section 78 
The particulars of this section and the contract for its completion were described 
in last year's report. This section was completed April 30, 1926. 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer - Section 79 
The particulars of this section and the contract for its construction were described 
in last year's report. Work on this section was completed August 11, 1926. No 
especial difficulties were encountered in the construction work. The flow in the 
Metropolitan Sewer at Chestnut Street, Arlington, was diverted through the 
branch relief sewer to this section April 28, 1926, and is now carried by means of 
Sections 79, 78 and 77 to the Metropolitan Sewer at Warren Street, West Medford. 
This appreciably decreases the pumping at the Alewife Brook Sewerage Pumping 
Station to which this sewage was formerly conducted. 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer - Section 80 

The work known as Section 80 of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System is 
located in Arlington, Massachusetts, and consists of a 24-inch and 20-inch Akron 
pipe and 24-inch cast-iron pipe main-line sewer and a 12-inch Akron pipe branch- 
line relief sewer. The main-line sewer extends from a point in Grove Street near 
Dudley Street westerly through land of Gerardo Riccardi, crossing Mill Brook 
through land of Arlington Gas Light Company, thence through land of Lucia 
Diloffa, other land of Arlington Gas Light Company and land of the heirs of 
Michael H. Kelly, crossing Brattle Street, thence through land of R. L. Page, 
crossing Mill Brook and thence through lands of J. J. Bowler, J. J. Donahoe, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Town of Arlington, crossing Hobbs Court and 
thence through lands of Thomas Quinn, The Theodore Schwamb Company, Inc., 
crossing a right of way and thence through lands of M. E. Young and J. Bitzer 
to a point in Forest Street, a total distance of about 3,665 linear feet. The branch 
relief sewer extends from the existing Metropolitan sewer in Massachusetts Avenue 
northerly through Hobbs Court and under Mill Brook to the above mentioned 
main-line sewer, a total distance of about 380 feet. 

The work included under this section has been placed under contract, some 
particulars of which are as follows: 

Date of contract No. 23 (Sewerage Division) August 23, 1926. 

Name of Contractor, Antony Cefalo. 

Length of main-line sewer, 3,665 feet. 

Length of branch relief sewer, 380 feet. 

Diameter of pipe sewers, 20-inch, 24-inch and 12-inch. 

Diameter of cast-iron pipes, 24 inches. 

Average depth of excavation, main-line, 73^ feet. 

Average depth of excavation, branch-line, 8 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Ralph W. Loud. 

Work was started on this section August 30, 1926, and at this date 3,380 feet of 
main-line sewer and 374 feet of the branch relief sewer have been laid. 



P. D. 48 37 

Belmont Relief Sewer 
Chapter 213, Acts of 1926, authorized the construction of an additional Metro- 
politan sewer for the relief of that part of Belmont which is tributary to the Alewife 
Brook Metropolitan sewer. This work will consist of one section only, Section 81. 

Belmont Relief Sewer - Section 81 

The work known as Section 81 of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System is 
located in Cambridge and Belmont and consists of a 30-inch diameter concrete 
sewer which extends from a point in the land of the Boston & Maine Railroad at 
Station 79 +70 of Section 43 of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System, through 
the lands of said Railroad running parallel to the Belmont Branch of Section 43 
of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System to a point in Belmont near Hills 
Crossing Station of said Railroad. 

The work included in this section has been placed under contract, some particu- 
lars of which are as follows : 

Date of Contract No. 24 (Sewerage Division) December 30, 1926. 

Name of contractor, J. H. Ferguson Company. 

Length of section, 3,585 feet. 

Diameter of concrete sewer, 30 inches. 

Average depth of excavation, 73^ feet. 

Approximate length of sewer on pile foundation, 900 feet. 

Work on this section has not yet started. 

Malden, Revere and Everett Drainage System 
Chapter 456 of the Acts of 1924 directed the Metropolitan District Commission 
to construct a drainage channel to improve a low area lying in the cities of Maiden, 
Revere and Everett. Surveys and land takings were completed and work was 
started on construction plans and field work on July 12, 1926. A temporary 
injunction by the Supreme Court was placed on the further carrying on of this 
work which ceased for the present on July 28, 1926, pending the decision of the 
Court on the questions before it. 

MAINTENANCE 

Scope of Work and Force Employed 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes the operating 
of 8 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house and 122.970 miles of Metropoli- 
tan sewers, receiving the discharge from 1,669.95 miles of town and city sewers 
at 522 points, together with the care and study of inverted siphons under streams 
and in the harbor. 

At present the permanent maintenance force consists of 174 men, of whom 108 
are employed on the North System and 66 on the South System. These are sub- 
divided as follows: North Metropolitan System, 67 engineers and other employees 
in the pumping stations and 41 men, including foremen, on maintenance, care of 
sewer lines, buildings and grounds; South Metropolitan System, 41 engineers and 
other employees in the pumping stations and 25 men, including foremen on main- 
tenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation of the pump- 
ing stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning and inspecting sewers and 
siphons, caring for tide gates, outfall sewers, regulators and overflows, measuring 
flow in sewers, inspection of connections to the Metropolitan sewers, and the care 
of pumping stations and other buildings, grounds and wharves. 

In addition to these regular duties, other work has been done by the maintenance 
employees in this department as follows : — 

East Boston Pumping Station 

A new impeller wheel together with a new shaft, sleeve and outbearing were 
installed at pump No. 2 at this station. 

The piston, piston rod and crosshead slides of engine No. 3, low pressure cylinder, 
were replaced by new ones. 

A concrete block locker building was constructed at the Chelsea side of the 
siphon leading under Chelsea Creek. 



38 P. D. 48 

Belle Isle Inlet 
Extensive repairs were made to tide gate, overflow and sand catcher at Belle Isle 
Inlet. 

Ward Street Pumping Station 
The tubes in vertical boiler No. 1 at this station had begun to fail at the water 
line. An examination showed that all of them were reduced in thickness by corro- 
sion. To avoid risk of loss of service of the boiler which might occur at any time 
and must occur at intervals, all the tubes were replaced by new ones. 

Quincy Pumping Station 
Repairs to roof at this station consisting of new copper gutters, down spouts, 
ridge rolls, ventilators and valleys were completed. 

Nut Island Screen-house 
In addition to the regular maintenance work at the Nut Island Screen-house 
and at the Hough's Neck Pumping Station, the employees of this station have 
made 4,019 lbs. of brass castings for the different pumping stations of the Sewerage 
Systems. A large amount of expert machine work has been done here for other 
stations. 

Gasolene in Public Sewers 

During the year the usual precautions have been maintained against the intro- 
duction of gasolene into the Metropolitan sewers. An inspector has been em- 
ployed who covers both North and South Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. His 
duties are to see that all newly constructed garages or other gasolene using estab- 
lishments are supplied with a proper gasolene separator and also to see that these 
separators are kept in working condition. 

During the year 1926 the number of permits issued by the municipalities in the 
Sewerage Districts for the construction of garages and other places where gasolene 
is used was 1,322. Each of these permits necessitates an examination by our 
inspector. Many of them are attended to through the mails and do not require 
a personal visit. Visits are made, however, to all locations where a connection is 
to be made with the public sewerage system and to such places as do not respond 
to the return postal cards sent out. During the year 70 such places were con- 
nected with the sewers that empty into the Metropolitan Systems. At the present 
time, there are, according to our records, 1,428 garages and other establishments 
where gasolene is used connected with the local sewerage systems which discharge 
into the Metropolitan sewers. 

This system of inspection has given satisfactory results. Occasionally odors of 
gasolene are detected in the sewers but the amount is small and the situation appears 
to be well in hand. 



P. D. 48 



39 





S co 








2 « 








60 "*£ 








» to 
















2» >o 








C S 








8 <=> 








•2 oo 








ts © 








O Q) 
















~° <=» 








Qs 8 








Tg "3 








f 1 ? 








5* S- 
•§ 8 








T£ © 








05 r n 








to 








•* 8 








^ S 








-S £ 








to *■» 








8^ 








§> 








« co 








co O 






El 






CD 
<N 

1-H 




co e 

3*8 




CO 

t~ 

CD 




^ CO 




a 


£ 


.8 8 




CD 
CD 
CD 

Q 


w 


e © 




02 


£ 8 


• 
CO 


fc 




8 


o 


<J 


El 


HO 


K 


i—i 




5 

3 


*3 
CD 


O 

ft 


54, 


co 

£ 


o 


to s 


"«o 

■*o 


CO 

Cv 

03 


W 


"S °* 


C 


s 


CO Q} 


e 


o 

e3 


w 


CO "6 

Is s 


-»o 

si 

to 


3 
o 


O 




co 


b. 




to '■O 


5 






II.? 





© 
to 



.8 

°o 
8 

s 

,5 



to 



B 



8 

co 
8 

•2 



•gA, 



Vw> J* CO 
©S"*i *«o 

8 8 "S 

«o o 8 
to o o 



2 



c 



CD 

■+} 

.2-9 *>■ O S « 

Ǥ & 
O 



60 , 



Art « 

5 +1 & " a 

Kdoo o 

^A,^ ft. 



CJ 



3 ^ 
- -°* 






*I 



O02 

O 



45 O C g> 

5? SU-5 «> 



S3 fe^ I? 



W ^^ 



fe02 



J l4l3fl 



5,2 






K 



0) 



OJ 



.B ft d 3'43 ^ 

5 O g o 3 e 



*« o >>S 1 

cj w co o 3 ° 
■J? «-, fl^ Ol 




-5 a .« fc.-S a 









»* i w S? _ 

S c d § £ 
-9 o o S S3 
60-43^ p 

3«« S-d <u 



o 
d 

a 

o 
O 

o 

— 

CO 

ii 

C8 
& 

o 
02 



co g E i T3 

iJ o I a 5 
^^tc^ d 



+5 

d I p O i^ CN t» CC 00 CO cN CN co t» p ^j ^H »-< •* iH eo 

r^ ^"jeoco^iOMeo^coooOTfT^eO'-HOOi-i-^ 

U 00 »0 iO CD CO iO iO 0C (55 t* CO i-H-<l<CO^ rj< 

Ph 



OS 

id 

CO 



d 

CJ 

o 

CO 

ft 



O CO TO lO rj< 00 CO ' 



!TtH00»HCOOSCNO>00eOCO 



c^cot^co^i^ocooxo6e6eot4cocjio6idi> 

C^05C^CSOO05O05O05^CD00C3>C0CNC3>C<l 



CO 

CN 

05 



.2 I <-ioo-*Tj<i^eor^'-Hcoi-0'0'-iOOeDiOrHcocN 

'"5 ' p^C^C0OI^CN»-i05C0Ot^i0CNC0c0»-i000q 

2 i^'c^cNcdidco^cdcoo6»dc>i»didTj<t^»d»do5 
72 



CN 

CO 

d 
o 



CO 
CO 



02 



OOC3'-<OOOOt>.C5'H^COt^'-'OOiOCO'-liO 
TtJCNji-Hi-JCN)OCOOCOCOCOi-H>COeOOOTtl^Tj< 

1-H^rHiNcdiNdidcoco'^rHdiN^o'dcNd 



o 

CO 
CO 



oooooooooooooooooooo 

OCOCO'-it»iOOOiOOCNCOOOt^OiMOO'#iOCMiO 
OO^pcNiqiO^C^^p^OO^^lOCOOCNOp 

cdcdcsoM c^dcccd^d^oddco'coco id 1 * oT 

i-H CO -"^ ■* lO CM CO CM O "O r-l r-1 k.^h^h CO 

1-1 1-1 



00 

o 



oooooooooooooooooooo 

gNHHOM00OC»OO'*iOiOiM(0O'-iOO 
00 "5 O (N >-J_p 01>0 i-H CO i>cq OCO CN ■* >0 i-i lO 

COMNfHOJONi- lOO"— i00iOcd l/ 5CO'-icdcN 
H©^'*Tf(HM(NO*'-i CN'-' eo 



o 

CM 

iq 

io" 

iO 
CO 



b^pcNpxiooqt»;^pp^p^wcNcopcN 
^' T -iOedidTt<cdcdidid^id'didcd>d-<*i>-»i5 



CO 



>OiOOOCOTf<-<tiTf<r^.XOCOCM005'*'- | '-<OOiO 
CM-*CMiOOOOTtiOOc005t>C5'H-*eoiOcM05 

qcoop^'-Hio<NTticocoiO'-icoeqcMcot>^»o 
ed>d^idco^idoo^c/3cM"rHi-r^cMrH rjT 



eo 

o" 
o 



*"3 T3 *^ *T3 ^3 "^ 
aj co cd co co cp 
..ddd..ddd 

asa aaa 

••OOO'-OOO 

eo eo o eo eo eo 

■■3 "3 *"3 T3 -3 '^3 

..ddd..ddd 

CO CO CO CO CO CO 

cDcococococococococococococpcococoeococo 

cocococoeOcoeOcOcQeOcocOcococococococoeO 

cOcOcOcOcOcOcOcocOcOcOcOcOcOcOcOcOcOcOcO 

cococococococooocococpcococococococpcoco 
oiajcccoa3GGa2a202a;'»2»20272»2aja2a272cc 



OOOOOiOt^CMC75-^iO-*'-IOOOO»000»00000 

r»i-;qeoT}<eo^^cMCMcO'-;oq'-;»o-«^->*t-»-;o 

dcdr»JcM^c^^'^c^>dco^05-*TfJTjJdddo^ 
coeoeO'Ot>'rfieMcoot*cO'-<'-i'^coeM'-HiQ 



C35 
CO 

00 



CD 

o 

H 

Q 

•< 

CO 

w 



O 



2 -^ 

CO CO 



ll 
CO 

o 



rr; 
. CO 

d 





d 
2 

Cfl 

o 



^3 

d- 



PKco^ 



d 



d "Og 



03 CO CO 



M ll 

- c-5 

i ■•* d 

"71 co d 



r, ii O-d d"? bfiOTl rrii-3 
9 oi-tl S 2 a d S.fl co-3 



ci O 



•^ V „ (H w g 

^0 a.S a^-s 



CO « 



ao "3 

>• CO 





Eh 



eQ^«uwS»<5P50oD2^^cc<;m(>>jftlfti 



CN 

C5 



CO 

3 

CO 

d 

CO 

eo 

a 

o 

d 


• pi 

JO 

"3 
a 
o 
a 

0) 

+3 

d 

CO 

CO* 

CN 

OS 



WW5 



40 



P. D. 48 



s 

CO 

w 
o 

H 
CO 

fc 

I-H 

o 

Ph 

o 

« 



W 
E-t 

O 
CO 



1 - 

§ g 

S3 
§1 






3'* 

cc 05 
^£ 

05 



05 ° 
S *> 

go 

£&* 
s? . .. 

3 CO 

05 O 
CQ JO 

CO r< 
05 O 



o 

eo 

i 

o 



05 



§ I 



H 

^> i 



eo 
g 

O 

HO 

fin 

o 



H»S 

p 

05 
CO 

«o 

V. 

a* 



05 5» 

«S 05 
CO «o 
?3> JO 

CO ^ 

9 e 

■*■* .* 

05 23 -5 
JE. "t3 "*•* 
©S -* 

f»8 §» 

05 ^2 42 

§>05"£ 

fa I 

05 5 

-Si 3 

^1 § 

g -5 eo 

^ is 
.5 -a* 



CO 
CN 



CO 

»-> 
05 
Xi 

a 

u 

Q 



03 



03 

3 
O 

Oj 

3 

ft 

o 
Ph 






• «■» © o' 

CO "«* g 

o> «h © 



I 



<x> 



-, 2 «8 -, eS «8 

•** "■« 1— *^ C i_, 

o 



•sill -2 

O 3 -M 03-3 +J 

r. jQ 03 02 03 cj 

.2-3 73 oj +"3 

«-gap,H§< 



^3 



73 

<u 



i«) 



-1 ^4 t> r\ &■ 



Ml 






t3 d 

2 <U^ 03 

.h 0!H 3 

o 



r "Sfl 



H 



73 



o^ mm 

=3 7317 h 03 



73 o 

OJ CJ 



k^; 



>>% "a 

n a ; 

£73 o'-3 
2 Sir! « 



HO 



^ ■ 5 « _, 



73 

a 

.-» 

a 

o 

O 

ft 
o 

0> 
03 
03 

a 

02 



„_, in -rt 

•- o fe o O 

o 



QQ 

o 

H 

Q 
•< 

00 



o 



3 q 00 00 p cq p i-< <-* oi --; I oqpoop 

O (N co -^ >-» cs oS 1^ OS co o ' ■^■^■^IN 
t^ 00 »o »o co <-i o co>-i coeo»-i 

3 
Ph 



CO 

d 

CO 



Ooio5oit^o6t^^»oo5io ' i<t^oro 

fc.OJOSOSOlOlOSt^tOOSt ^05-* 



OS 







05 







Cj 


-u 


.O 


60 


(1 


a) 


Ot 1 


03 


H 


a 




£ 


<j 


- -H 


a 


ffi 




-♦-> 





32 




P 


O 





OQ 



iTt<r-ix-*cocnoit>-ocoo4cooso 
gpt^oocoppoq«oiOTjjc>4pioco»o 

<^co^;o^M^c\i-^a)'-<G0<NO5CNi 

• >H t-» l-( I-H I-H 

02 



CO 

CNj 

CO 



03 
T3 COIN CO' 



01 



1 CO O C75 Tt< CO iO 



1— iCOt>.CO»0'Ot^-'-Ht>05 



<— • CM rt<<N 



CO CO CO CN CN CN i-i H O CO ■* H O 



CO 
CO 

CO 



000000000000000 

lOO^nNOOlN^OOOiOCOtO 

oor^r-icoo'0'00'<* | oot v -oq-^<'*co 

»-HCN Tj^LOCOiOI>COOCO COCOC0 05 
■^iOTttiOCNCOC75'HCN'-H-<tnOCO 



O 
CO 
CO 

co- 
co 
IO 



0000000000 0000 

HiOOSNHHOtDN I HffiHOO 

t^-*oo_co_oopioco_CN I OpCOCN 
t-J'cnco -* ot^oTi^o-o CSCNCO 

Tt* IO t}H IO CN CC CO 



CN 



coco 



o 

1— t 

CO 

CO 



IO IO 

lOppCNppt>;-*05Ttl lO--<COCO 

OJ O l> >0 »0 1> OS ■* CO »0 IcbcdrjiT^ 



■* 
^ 



OiONNr-iON^ON C0C01>CO 

CO Tf 050 COCOOOCC CO I Tf<l^COCO 

fHCN i-HCO^ IOCN !>OJrH I t>i-HC0 

CNiO-CO-o"'*'*l>rr-rcN rH lOO" 

^H i-H 



o 

CN 

CO 



7373"^ 7373 1 73 

ticjiu oj 05 a; 

33S 33 3 

aaa aa a 

O O O • • • O O • • o . • • 

o o o « o u 

737373 7373 73 

Oflfl. ..00.. 0... 
03 o3 03 o3 o3 03 

Dojojojcoojajouaj o <d o v 

O3c3c3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3 O3o3o3w3 

>_ (^ t. - M 1- J. ^ t, t. f— f— f— ' ►— 

O3o3o;o3o3o3o3c3c3o3f O3o3o3c: 

aaaaaao-aaa I 0,0,0,0. 



HOOtOtONONC»iO ■*O'-iC0 

CO »0 O iO O Tf CN iO t~- CN ICNpiOCN 

t^OtCOTj5«00"iOCNo6oi ' CNC0iO»O 

CN CD I> IO IO »C CO CN CO r-H t>.OCN 



CO 

p 

CN 

OS 



03 
00 O 

_^>o 

■33 'C 

PhP3 <u 

o oHB 

o o^ 



. >- 

■~ 

03 

« 
o 



o 

o 



-^ 03 



.^4 

h 

03 

Ph 

* <u 

73 

>. 

•w 

9 9 <" 



03 03O B *^57303— <00^ 

o o 2 ca * * S53 o a> w 

m«oq^^^«SfflP«P3a^z 



o 

>>q 
5P4 

o o 
o o 

03 03 

o o 



fl — 73 



o 
H 



>. 










i 










3 










^"O 










iC-r 1 










-n h 

os^ 










rH <U 










c 










"S " 










_ 02 










03 -w 










aa 

c.9 










CJ "^ 










^a 










a 5 

oln 










£ >> 










-M 










' 










O OJ 










■a m 










^2 




















OJ 










aj 9 










rt 03 

23 










73 O 










ft 










03 O 










■h 










CO""?, 










S^ 








» 


i-l 








35 


Xi 








-* 


-5 

^3 O 








>o 


^02 








*. 


ft 











<J 05 
_ J3 












■►» 










°fl 








ad 


S3 








»— 1 










ft 


S£ 









ft 


S"S 








73 


>>a 








<5 


+i 








09 

a 


J "^ 










C5 <B 

03 H 








OJ 

03 


0> 03 











J 








o3 


•-* O 








u 


^3 




♦> 







33fc 




O 




■p 


c,>, 




■A 

Q 


a 

0) 

45 


03 
-0 

a 


X 






93 


u 


f* 




fio 


>> oa 


^P4 




03 
»- 


03 

03 





15 

■OT3 
-^ 




0) 

s 



03 
73 


73 




u-* o3 


n 


4d 





c3 


05 



a 




03 

a 


03 

O 


4) n 

a « 
s 

05^ 



c3 


O 





+i 

cc 
O 


01 


00 a 


73.0M 









73 


•g^a 


>- — 


rt 


OJ 




-*-* 


OS 

oj5 


a 


73 
O 


£ 


•& 


cu . 


c 





73 





^ 03 





O 


^.2 





+j 


a 





a^ 


23 


O 



a 
a 


03 






«« 


















o 


C3 
M 


"«« 





a 


O 


03 O 

S 03 


03 K-, 


OJ 


. — * 


OJ 


O 


aj -a 


1- 




t- 


O 


•- 1? 


p 


■H 





-^ H 








() 


SI Oj 




OB +J 


O 
1— 1 


WPh 




Ph<; 



P. D. 48 



41 





C=5 © 








•S e 




3* 




'£"3 








«o 




CO 








o v. 




S^ 




eo ca 




03 to 




^ -to 




i~o 




'StD 




SS 




e c> 




•M 




co eo 




s e 




O ?> 




•5 S» 




1H 




l"»»a 




s S 5 




*4..§ 




J=>~ 




ft, s 




*?'£ 




to •« 




"8 s 




•co 




•fcO -»o 


a) 


CO 2? 
^ 1 


S 


co 
•«. to 


H 


**3 v. 


E-" 
CO 

H 

GO 


-Sft. 


to es> 




£ 52 


H 


s-2 


O 


w ■« 


<{ 


**> £, 


K 


fe°3 




p 


W 


°Q § 


cc 


*£-» <» 




o v. 


5 


eo "^ 


g 




(-1 


^ 


o 


^^ 


Ph 


^ A 


o 


§ © eo* 


H 


•S 2 £ 








sa. e*g 


B 

o 




eo ftj ^ 




c» ^ >»»» 




§ -« e 




*» S "se 




■« to © 




£>1^ 




CC>« 




^fts S 








O ^Ah 




"»>» «.T 




to O 




&s"~ 




e "O 5> 




5^ g 
«3 j» «^> 




to ■" •*■* 




-< o -o 




©> w •*» 




.e o-b 




£~ S 




to ?3> © 




S> <-"2 to 




•«"» to _ 




to 53 g 




^ ^ 




60 •««> 




8*2 2 

~° S s 

*- ^ o 




^ g'-S 




Cs> to -if 




S *- S 

•g"3 £, 




s^ o 




J^ft, 




« os 




0>^ © 




>~«i 




►O 




s 




Eh 





bl 








bio of 

ibutin 

rea 

to 

imate 

rea 


Cent. 

35.9 

30.6 


CO 
CO 




cs 43-< +i<! 


(4 






P4g p 








O 








til 








, .S o ^ o 








o 5.2 o .2 

3 3 <v — < 3 


49 

a <r>o 


"* 




Ratio 

Contrib 

Popula 

to Pres 

Tota 

Popula 




CO 
00 




o 
Ph 






>1 CJ 


02 






oj s« 


^<NCO 


00 




Area 
Itimat 

to 
ontrib 
Sewag 


Sdfo 

.0<M 


CO 
CN 




O" -1 '^ 


IN 




& O 


CO 






timated 
Area 
w Con- 
buting 
swage 


00 


tN 




••^ O CO 


CO 




. CO CO 


t* 




« ►S'ecc 


O" 






W Z~ 


CO 






-o a 

+3 S3— i-ri 


oo 


o 




i-HCO 


rH 




cs S ea-e 


i-l CO 


•* 




Estim 

Pres 

Tot 

Popula 


00 CO 


■* 




O00 


Oi 


co 

CM 


t^»o 




a> 








»-< 








rH 


imated 

>pula- 

n now 

ntrib- 

:ting 

iwage 


oo 


O 


CO 


c^r^ 


Oi 




55,5 
63,1 


CO 
00 

T-l 


e 

0> 




COTft 


1-1 

1-T 


OJ 























o 


<u w in _o 3.2 






•J. 
e6 

<D 
e3 

a 


Estimat 

Number 

Person 

Served 1 

Each Ho 

Connect 




CO 


■4^ 
00 








o 


^^ 






C 
O 


Number 
of Con- 
nections 
ith Loca 

Sewers 


Tjtl-H 

t^o 




100,3 
62,9 


eo* 

CO 


O 


P 






El 










•0 


73 T) 


1 




8) 


<D 0> 




/ 


d 

JO 


d d 


1 




a 


aa 






o 


o o 






O 


u o 






«- 


X)T) 






o 


d d 






© 


c8 e9 






4i 


oj c 






*» *j 






e8 


e8 d 






U (h 






0. 


03 ee 


I 




u 


aa 


1 




OQ 


coco 








N.00 


"5 




Miles 
of Loca 
Sewers 
Con- 
nected 


OOi 
cooi 


Oi 




OOF. 


CO 
CD 






• 


• 






o d 






m 


* efl 






S 


sj 






B 

3d 


go 


• 




CO 


2 c 


to 

43 

o 






•SJ3 


H 






f 3 








Zco 





42 P. D. 48 

PUMPING STATIONS 

Capacities and Results 
North Metropolitan System 

Deer Island Pumping Station 
At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with impeller wheels 
8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds-Corliss 
type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 53,800,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 79,300,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 143,800,000 gallons. 

East Boston Pumping Station 
At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with impeller wheels 
8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds-Corliss 
type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 73,000,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 77,300,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 141,800,000 gallons. 

Charlestown Pumping Station 
At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of them having 
impeller wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 feet in diameter. They are 
driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump : 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 49,800,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 43,500,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 69,300,000 gallons. 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station 
The plant at this station consists of two 9-inch Andrews commercial centrifugal 
pumps, direct connected by horizontal shafts to compound marine engines, together 
with a pump and engine added later. The latter consists of a specially designed 
engine of the vertical cross-compound type, having between the cylinders a cen- 
trifugal pump rotating on a horizontal axis. 

Contract capacity of the 2 original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 20,500,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 5,800,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 10,600,000 gallons. 

Reading Pumping Station 
At this station are two submerged centrifugal pumps, one of 2,500,000 gallons per 
24 hours, and one of 4,000,000 gallons per 24 hours, capacity. These operate against 
a maximum head of 65 feet, and are actuated by vertical shafts directly connected 
with 75 and 100 horsepower motors. Alternating current of 440 volts furnished 
by the municipal plant of the town of Reading is used. 



Average quantity pumped per 24 hours : 833,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 1,100,000 gallons. 



P. D. 48 



43 



South Metropolitan System 



Ward Street Pumping Station 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, of the Allis- 
Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the plungers of which are 48 inches 
in diameter with a 60-inch stroke and one 50,000,000-gallon centrifugal pumping 
unit actuated by a 500 H.P. Uniflow engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 
Average coal duty for the year: 69,800,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 36,200,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day : 58,200,000 gallons. 

Quincy Pumping Station 
The plant at this station consists of one compound condensing Deane duplex 
piston pumping unit and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine and one Morris centrifugal pump driven by a Morris 
compound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Morris centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons; Deane, 
5,000,000 gallons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 
Average coal duty for the year: 31,400,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 6,238,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 16,460,000 gallons. 

Nut Island Screen-house 
The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate actuated by 
small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two vertical Deane boilers, 80 
horsepower each, operate the engines, provide heat and light for the house, burn 
materials intercepted at the screens, and furnish power for the Hough's Neck 
pumping station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens: 62,200,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity passing screens per day: 170,000,000 gallons. 

Hough's Neck Pumping Station 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal pumps with 
vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct-current motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from the Nut Island 
Screen-house, and as used at present it does not materially increase the amount of 
coal used at the latter station. 

Average quantity raised each day: 245,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 504,100 gallons. 

Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Eight Metropolitan Sewerage 
Pumping Stations during the Year, as compared with the Corresponding Vol- 
umes for the Previous Year. 



Pumping Station 



Deer Island . 

East Boston . 

Charlestown . 

Alewife Brook 

Reading 

Quincy 

Ward Street (actual gallons pumped) 

Hough's Neck 



Jan. 1, 1926, 

to Dec. 31, 

1928 



Gallons 

79,300,000 

77,300,000 

43,500,000 

5,800,000 

833,000 

6,238,000 

36,200,000 

245,000 



Average Daily Pumpage 



Jan. 1, 1925, 

to Dec. 31, 

1925 



Gallons 

78,100,000 

76,100,000 

45.000,000 

5,900,000 

7S3.000 

5,002,000 

35,110,000 

212,000 



Increase during the 
Year 



Gallons 
1,200,000 
1,200,000 
1,500,0001 
100,0001 

50,000 
1,236,000 
1,090,000 

33,000 



Per Cent 

1.5 

1.6 

3.31 

1.71 

6.4 
24.7 

3.1 
15.6 



i Decrease. 



44 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 

The Metropolitan Sewerage Districts now have outfalls in Boston Harbor at 
five points, two of which may discharge sewage from the North District and three 
from the South District. 

During the year the sewage of the North District has been discharged wholly 
through the outlet located near Deer Island light. The other outfall of this system 
is closed by a cast-iron cover which can easily be removed. 

Of the outfalls of the South District two extend for a distance exceeding one 
mile from the shore of Nut Island, Quincy, and the third one, called an emergency 
outlet, extends about 1,500 feet from the same. It was not necessary to discharge 
through this outfall during the year. 

During the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan District 
outfall at Deer Island has been 79,300,000 gallons of sewage per 24 hours, with a 
maximum rate of 143,800,000 gallons during a stormy period in February, 1926. 
The amount of sewage discharged into the North Metropolitan District averaged 
121 gallons per day for each person, taking the estimated population of the District 
contributing sewage. If the sewers in this District were restricted to the admission 
of sewage proper only, this per capita amount would be considerably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 62,200,000 gallons of sewage 
per 24 hours has passed through the screens at the Nut Island screen-house and has 
been discharged from the outfalls into the outer harbor. The maximum rate of 
discharge per day which occurred during a stormy period in March, 1926, was 
170,000,000 gallons. The discharge of sewage through these outfalls represents 
the amount of sewage contributed by the South Metropolitan District, which was 
at the rate of 134 gallons per day per person of the estimated number contributing 
sewage in the District. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger in the South 
Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metropolitan District, because owing 
to the large size and unused capacity of the South District High-level Sewer, much 
storm water is at present admitted to the sewers of this District which will be 
reduced later. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens 

The material removed from the sewage at the screens of the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage Stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating materials, has during 
the year amounted to 1,909 cubic yards. This is equivalent to 1.78 cubic feet for 
each million gallons of sewage pumped at Deer Island. 

The material removed from the sewage at the screens of the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage Stations amounted to 4,010 cubic yards, equal to 4.77 cubic feet per 
million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers and siphons indicate that 
they are free from deposit. 

FREDERICK D. SMITH 

Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division. 
Boston, January 1, 1927. 



P. D. 48 45 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

OF THE 

METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION 

as of December 1, 1926 
PARKS DIVISION 

CONSTRUCTION 
Metropolitan Parks Construction Fund 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $9,093,043.96 

Receipts added before June 1, 1901 198,942.81 

89,291,986.77 
Expenditures. 
Charles River Reservation: 

Claims $718.90 

$718.90 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 9,262,759.13 

9,263,478.03 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $28,508.74 

Metropolitan Parks Construction Fund, Series II 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $9,404,000.00 

Receipts from sales, etc 29,934.16 

$9 433 934.16 
Chap. 79, Items 649 and 660, Acts of 1926 ' 13,749.63 

$9,447,683.79 
Expenditures 
Old Colony Parkway: 
Construction: 
Contracts : 

Bay State Dredging & Cont. Co. . . $738,328.25 

Coleman Bros 81,153.90 

John W. O'Connell 903.30 

$820,385.45 

Labor and Materials 60,359,54 

$880,744.99 

Land 13,000.00 

Engineering: 

Services $10,939.06 

Supplies and expenses 1,608.83 

12,547.89 

Claims 200.00 

Construction of sidewalks 1,049.10 

Advertising bids 605.92 

Printing contracts 128.62 

$908,276.52 

Quannapowitt Parkway: 

Construction: 

Contract, Greenough Const. Co $24,758.30 

Labor and materials 101.42 

$24,859.72 

Engineering: 

Services $3,244.74 

Supplies and expenses 115.13 

3,359.87 

Claims 50.00 

Advertising bids 65.65 

$28,335.24 

Neponset Bridge: 

Construction: 

Contract, Crandall Eng. Co $5,284.99 

Labor and materials 10,912.36 

$16,197.35 

Engineering: 

Supplies and expenses 25.00 

16,222.35 

$952 834 11 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 8,421,807.82 

9,374,641.93 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $73,041.86 

Charles River Basin Construction Fund 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $4,500,000.00 

Receipts : 

Period prior to December 1, 1925 9,368.91 

$4,509,368.91 

Fit T)€Yl (LitlL TCS 

Total amount charged to Dec. 1, 1925 . 4,472,862.22 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $36,506.69 



46 P. D. 48 

Nantasfcet Beach Construction Fund 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $700,000.00 

Receipts: 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . 5,881.50 

$705,881.50 
Expenditures 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 705,881.50 

North Beacon Street Bridge Construction Fund 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $175,000.00 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 174,853.50 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $146.50 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge Construction Fund 
Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $600,000.00 

Expenditures 

Interest $33,680.83 

Bronze tablet 330.00 

$34,010.83 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 488,285.73 

522,296.56 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $77,703.44 

Northern Traffic Route Construction Fund 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $2,100,000.00 

Chap. 79, Item 647, Acts of 1926 300,000.00 

$2,400,000.00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

Coleman Bros $520,817.51 

Bay State Dredging <fc Cont. Co. . . . 21,602.53 

$542,420.04 

Labor and Materials 9,219.48 

$551,639.52 

Land 1,064,064.04 

Engineering: 

Services $25,205.30 

Supplies and expenses 2,046.17 

27,251.47 

Legal: 

Services $9,754.64 

Expenses 830.90 

10,585.54 

Claims 12,493.69 

Advertising bids 495.82 

Printing contracts, etc 223.92 

$1,666,754.00 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 118,582.61 

1,785,336.61 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $614,663.39 

CHARLES RIVER BRIDGES CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Brookline Street, Essex Street, Cottage Farm Bridge Construction Fund 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $1,100,000.00 

Chapter 327, Acts of 1926 200,000.00 

$1,300,000.00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, J. F. White Cont. Co $2,661.45 

Labor and materials 20,558.75 

$23,220.20 

Engineering: 

Supplies and expenses 5,220.12 

Interest 7,398.59 

Labor 2,268.00 

Lighting 182.64 

Advertising bids 161.35 

Printing contracts 115.63 

$38,566.53 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 125,270.96 

163,837.49 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $1,136,162.51* 



P. D. 48 47 

Western Avenue, Arsenal Street Bridge Construction Fund 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $175,000.00 

Chapter 327, Acts of 1926 25,000.00 

$200,000.00 

Expenditures 
Construction : 
Contracts : 

Simpson Bros $5,959.66 

V. James Grande 34,133.78 

$40,093.44 

Labor and materials 1,889.73 

$41,983.17 

Engineering: 

Supplies and expenses . 1,210.75 

Interest 8,004.81 

Paving tracks 2,710.00 

Lighting 158.72 

$54,067.45 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 138,693.49 

192,760.94 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $7,239.06 

Western Avenue Bridge Construction Fund 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $275,000.00 

Chapter 327, Acts of 1926 50,000.00 

$325,000.00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Simpson Bros $5,603.37 

Labor and materials 3,044.10 

$8,647.47 

Interest , 19,607.16 

$28,254.63 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 274,828.30 

303,082.93 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $21,917.07 

River Street, Brighton Street Bridge Construction Fund 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $275,000.00 

Chapter 327, Acts of 1926 ' . 25,000.00 

$300,000.00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Luke S. White, Inc. $80,269.98 

Engineering: 

Supplies and expenses 2,167.29 

Interest 2,387.52 

Bronze tablet 440.00 

$85,264.79 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 197,148.68 

282,413.47 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $17,586.53 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund 

Receipts, Dec. 1, 1925 to Dec. 1, 1926: 
Bath Houses: 
Revere Beach: 

Sale of tickets $27,749.60 

Miscellaneous 606.93 

$28,356.53 

Nantasket Beach: 

Sale of tickets $16,530.80 

Steam furnished 5,634.25 

Miscellaneous 683.18 

22,848.23 

Nahant Beach: 

Sale of tickets $9,264.35 

Miscellaneous 81.26 

9,345.61 

Magazine Beach: 

Sale of tickets $2,738.80 

Miscellaneous 162.50 

2,901.30 

Blue Hills: 

Sale of tickets $365.50 

Miscellaneous 1.50 

367.00 

$63,818.67 



48 P. D. 48 

Miscellaneous — Continued 

Buildings $53,085.00 

Land 4,267.00 

Ducts 1,454.08 

Locations 1,246.48 

Houses 1,238.33 

$61,290.89 

Wood S3.282.46 

Old lumber, metal, etc 418.55 

Hay and grass , 350.00 

Miscellaneous 313.51 

4,364.52 

Income from securities 11,355.34 

Court fines 10,711.00 

Privileges . 9,137.50 

Reconstruction of Harvard Bridge reimbursement 5,971.87 

Police services 2,824.76 

Sidewalk and entrance construction 2,652.80 

Damages to roadway 2,400.00 

Boat hire 997.20 

Damage to property 892.69 

Miscellaneous 310.96 



$176 728 20 
Receipts, prior to Dec. 1, 1925 2,813',656.31 

Expenditures, Dec. 1, 1925, to Dec. 1, 1926: 
General Expense: 

Receipt books, etc $95.06 

Interest 13.63 

$108.69 

Police : 

Physicians' services 56.25 

Engineering: 
Tickets, etc 98.55 

Blue Hills Reservation: 

Boat $246.76 

Repairs to houses 145.72 

Bath house expense 42.15 

Court costs 3.90 

438.53 

Stony Brook Reservation: 
Repairs to houses 5.51 

Blue Hill Parkway: 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Contract, J. A. McCarthy 554.54 

Old Colony Parkway: 
Construction: 

Contract, Crandall Engineering Co. 6,865.15 

Black's Creek Dam: 
Construction: 

Labor and materials 1,000.00 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: 

Repairs to Lawrence Tower $4,402.78 

Repairs to houses, etc 204.02 

Middlesex Fells Parkway: 4,606.80 

Loam i $1,529.78 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost $664.83 

Refunds 117.50 

782.43 

Repairs to Wellington Bridge: 

Contract, Simpson Bros. Corporation 6,419.74 

8,731.95 

Mystic Valley Parkway: 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 1,232.94 

Alewife Brook Parkway: 
Miscellaneous 2.15 

Revere Beach Reservation: * 

Bath House: 

Payrolls $25,806.67 

Bathing suits, etc 5,196.23 

Heat, light and. power 2,658.08 

Hardware, etc 538.34 

Office supplies 513.50 

Repairs 17,276.14 

Medicines and attendance 102.58 

Miscellaneous supplies 3,096.96 

$55,188.50 

Legal: 

Services 150.00 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 180.24 

Advertising 41.25 

$55,559.99 

Revere Beach Parkway: 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost 279.85 



$2,990,384.51 



P. D. 48 

Winthrop Parkway: 
Sidewalk and entrance construction: 
Cost 



Miscellaneous — Continued 



$163.25 



Nahant Beach Parkway: 
Bath House: 

Payrolls .... 
Heat, light and power . 
Hardware, etc. 
Office supplies . 
Repairs .... 
Miscellaneous supplies . 



$8,513.42 
888.01 
141.63 
242.92 
9,192.35 
420.97 



Charles River Upper Division: 
Repairs to boat house 



Riverside Recreation Grounds: 

Rental 

Water rates 



$30.00 
50.00 



Charles River Lower Basin: 
Magazine Beach Bath House: 

Payrolls 

Bathing suits, etc. . 

Hardware, etc 

Office supplies .... 
Medicines and attendance 
Miscellaneous supplies . 



19,399.30 

487.58 

80.00 



$2,825.77 

7.12 

66.23 

44.36 

9.79 

264.15 



Construction of landing stage : 

Contract, Bay State Dredging & Contracting Co. 

Cambridge Parkway: 
Temporary road at Western Avenue: 

Contract, Luke S. White 

Labor and materials 

Lighting 



3,217.42 
5,823.45 



$5,396.49 
791.68 
215.32 



9,040.87 



Nantasket Beach Reservation: 

Bath House: 

Payrolls 

Bathing suits, etc. . 
Heat, light and power . 

Hardware, etc 

Office supplies .... 

Repairs 

Medicines and attendance 
Miscellaneous supplies . 



6,403.49 



$14,012.28 
553.99 

1,919.81 
364.11 
118.18 

5,927.83 
205.80 

2,408.81 



Sea-wall 

Repairs to buildings, etc. 

Advertising 



$25,510.81 

3,662.36 

13,137.26 

45.00 



Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 



42,355.43 

$157,470.82 
2,515,538.24 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 

Metropolitan Parks Trust Fund 
Receipts: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1926 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 



$106.81 
40,776.92 



Expenditures: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1926 — 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 $38,106.50 



49 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 

Edwin U. Curtis Memorial Trust Fund 
Receipts: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1926 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 



$2,673,009.06 
$317,375.45 

$40,883.73 

38,106.50 
$2,777.23 



$41.23 
1,374.40 



No expenditures 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 

John W. Weeks Bridge Trust Fund 
Receipts: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1926 

Expenditures: 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1926 



$1,415.63 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 

General Revenue, Bunker Hill Monument 
Receipts : 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1926 

For the period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 



$1,415.63 

$234,877.33 
153,429.36 
$81,447.97 



$4,507.50 
16,680.90 

$21,188.40 



50 P. D. 48 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, GENERAL 

Appropriation Dec. 1, 1925, to Dec. 1, 1926 $779,594.63 

Expenditures 
Administration : 

Police $225,718.35 

Salaries: 

Commissioners ■. $2,500.00 

Secretary and clerks 12,516.43 

Chief Engineer & Assistants .... 16,024.48 

31,040.91 

Rent, care and lighting of building 2,332.53 

Repairs 81.30 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses 1,990.93 

Printing . 682.74 

Engineering supplies and expenses: 

General $874.87 

Auto expense 187.84 

1,062.71 

Pensions and annuities 24,862.40 

$287,771.87 

Blue Hills Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $49,209.55 

Moth work 26,115.77 

Road repairs 1,417.75 

$76,743.07 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $13,209.33 

Moth work 750.98 

Road repairs 1,053.94 

15,014.25 

91,757.32 

Stony Brook Reservation: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $3,924.52 

Moth work 4,272.90 

Road repairs 381.68 

$8,579.10 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,572.65 

Moth work 324.79 

Road repairs 568.77 

2,466.21 

11,045.31 

Neponset River Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $533.12 

Moth work 1,149.03 

$1,682.15 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $147.88 

Moth work 115.95 

263.83 

1,945.98 

Quincy Shore Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $8,370.71 

Moth work 286.75 

$8,657.46 

Street lighting 2,532.09 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $938.36 

Road repairs 23.00 

961.36 

12,150.91 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General . $45,634.05 

Moth work 21,991.58 

Road repairs 9,929.23 

$77,554.86 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $16,299.84 

Moth work 453.07 

Road repairs . 1,523.47 

18,276.38 

95,831.24 

Mystic River Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $11,811.63 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 2,028.42 

13,840.05 

Revere Beach Reservation 

Labor and teaming: 

General $41,289.36 

Road repairs . . ... . . . 46.71 

$41,336.07 

Street lighting 7,913.17 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 9,421.78 

58,671.02 



P. D. 48 51 

Lynn Shore Reservation: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $9,663.03 

Road repairs 315.79 

$9,978.82 

Street lighting .... 2,354.81 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 



General $3,362.66 

Road repairs 150.92 



3,513.58 



Winthrop Shore Reservation: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $7,641.08 

Road repairs 1,004.51 



$15,847.21 



$8,645.59 



2,603.52 



Street lighting 609.84 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,548.22 

Road repairs 1,055.30 

Charles River Upper Division: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $38,698.34 

Moth work 2,668.20 

Road repairs 9,666.94 

$51,033.48 

Street lighting 1,342.19 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $17,151.09 

Road repairs 2,798.42 

19,949.51 



11,858.95 



Riverside Recreation Grounds: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $4,607.25 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses : 

General 3,004.25 



72,325.18 



Beaver Brook Reservation: 
Labor and Teaming: 

General $2,708.86 

Moth work 567.00 

— $3,275.86 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1,163.16 

Cambridge Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: • 

General $28,816.85 

Moth work 909.75 

Road repairs 1,566.00 

$31,292.60 

Street lighting ... 3,521.14 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 



7,611.50 



4,439.02 



General $8,595.56 

Road repairs 1,050.29 



9,645.85 



44,459.59 $729,555.15 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $50,039.48 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND — SPECIALS 

Band Concerts 
Appropriation (Chapter 79, Acts of 1926) . $20,000.00 

Expenditures 

Advertising $37.10 

Bands: 

Blue Hills Division $1,013.20 

Middlesex Fells Division 2,495.00 

Revere Beach Division 4,030.00 

Charles River Upper Division 2,993.60 

Nantasket Beach Division 9,257.50 

Bunker Hill 165.00 



19,954.30 



19,991.40 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $8.60 

Clearing Woods 

Appropriation (amount approved for Workmen's Compensation Act) $2,883.86 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1925 1,372.57 

$1,511.29 

Expenditures 

Industrial accident compensation 659.29 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $852.00 



52 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund — Specials — Concluded 

Quincy Shore Reservation 

Appropriation (Chapter 79, Acts of 1926) $140,000.00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Paul Caputo $115,057.68 

Labor and materials . 6,001.83 



Engineering: 

Services . . $5,038.50 

Supplies and expenses 421.18 



$121,059.51 



5,459.68 



Printing 106.82 

Advertising 104.60 



126,730.61 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $13,269.39 

Water Pipe, Revere Beach Reservation 

Appropriation (Chapter 79, Acts of 1926) $7,500.00 

No expenditures 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 . . $7,500.00 

Certain Lands, Mystic Lakes 

Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) $25,000.00 

No expenditures 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $25,000.00 

Repairing Sea-Wall, Winthrop 

Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) $40,000.00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Labor and materials 39,922.50 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $77.50 

Nahant Beach Playground 

Appropriation (Chapter 430, Acts of 1924) $5,000.00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1925 3,032.50 

$1,967.50 
Expenditures 
Construction: 

Labor and materials 1,058.88 



$908.62* 



♦Reverted. 



METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, BOULEVARDS, GENERAL 

Appropriation, Dec. 1, 1925, to Dec. 1, 1926 . . $443,000.00 

Balance brought forward from 1925 appropriation to cover 1925 expenditures on 1926 books 48.41 



Expenditures 
Administration : 

Police $87,938.41 

Salaries : 

Commissioners $2,500.00 

Secretary and clerks, etc 13,515.50 

Chief Engineer and Assistants 17,085.27 

33,100.77 

Rent, care and lighting of building 1,948.16 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses 2,680.23 

Printing 64.63 

Engineering supplies and expenses: 

General $874.33 

Auto expense 167.29 



$443,048.41 



1,041.62 



Blue Hills Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $6,507.67 

Moth work . 45.50 



$126,773.82 



$6,553.17 



Street lighting 2,385.93 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,035.61 

Road repairs . . . . . . . 391.49 



1,427.10 



Neponset River Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $886.50 

Moth work 38.75 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General . . $233.46 

Road repairs 40.83 



10,366.20 



$925.25 



274.29 



1,199.54 



P. D. 48 53 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, General — Continued 

Furnace Brook Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $6,618.01 

Moth work 45.50 

$6,663.51 

Street lighting 2,705.30 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $734.08 

Road repairs 263.83 

997.91 

10,366.72 

Old Colony Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $2,848.44 

Street lighting 1,848.23 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 609.83 

5,306.50 

West Roxbury Parkway: 

Labor and Teaming: 

General $1,092.89 

Moth work 475.18 

1,568.07 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 410.72 

Road repairs 237.70 

648.42 

2,216.49 

Dedham Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $60.00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

Road repairs 126.33 

186.33 

Middlesex Fells Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $20,733.00 

Moth work 467.79 

Road repairs 4,966.63 

$26,167.42 

Street lighting 11,341.96 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $4,124.98 

Road repairs 3,830.82 

7,955.80 

45,465.18 

Mystic Valley Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $18,239.34 

Moth work 331.26 

Road repairs 845.37 

$19,415.97 

Street lighting 4,881.86 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $7,969.91 

Road repairs 608.32 

8,578.23 

32,876.06 

Lynn Fells Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $4,069.45 

Moth work 39.68 

Road repairs 132.65 

$4,241.78 

Street lighting 786.39 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $580.71 

Road repairs 318.69 

899.40 

5,927.57 

Middlesex Fells Roads: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $6,094.53 

Road repairs 2,506.70 

$8,601.23 

Street lighting 2,220.98 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $673.37 

Road repairs 1,272.28 

1,945.65 

12,767.86 

Woburn Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $3,875.79 

Moth work 362.78 

$4,238.57 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1,351.40 

5,589.97 



54 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, General — Continued 

Alewife Brook Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $5,966.88 

Moth work . . . 41.26 

Road repairs 465.41 

$6,473.55 

Street lighting 638.15 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $2,269.02 

Road repairs 542.20 

2,811.22 



Revere Beach Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $25,538.66 

Moth work 200.28 

Road repairs 1,744.93 

$27,483.87 

Street lighting 11,516.06 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $11,945.41 

Road repairs 1,229.28 

13,174.69 

Nahant Beach Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $5,977.22 

Street lighting 869.16 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 254.20 

Winthrop Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $2,034.73 

Road repairs 46.71 

$2,081 .'44 

Street lighting 1,225.51 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 24.50 

Lynnway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $10,996.89 

Road repairs 162.73 

$11,159.62 

Street lighting 238.26 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $2,570.65 

Road repairs 53.90 

2,624.55 

Hammond Pond Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $270.00 

Moth work 2,511.00 

$2,781.00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

eneral 149.80 



$9,922.92 



Lip 

G 



Fresh Pond Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $4,346.26 

Moth work 136.50 

Road repairs 352.00 

$4,834.76 

Street lighting 302.49 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,104.87 

Road repairs . 382.28 

1,487.15 

Cottage Farm Bridge: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $6,027.45 

Road repairs 324.00 

$6,351.45 

Street lighting 365.22 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 799.00 

Harvard Bridge: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $1,971.00 

Road repairs 90.00 

$2,061.00 

Street lighting 1,913.67 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

Road repairs 58.87 



52,174.62 



7,100.58 



3,331.45 



14,022.43 



2,930.80 



6,624.40 



7,515.67 



4,033.54 



P. D. 48 55 

Metropolitan Parka Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, General — Concluded 

Neponset Bridge: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $7,626.30 

Street lighting 1,661.18 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1,048.73 

$10,336.21 

Western Avenue Bridge: 

Street lighting 366.64 

$377,401.50 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $65,646.91 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND. BOULEVARDS — SPECIALS 

Blue Hill Riveb Road 

Appropriation (Chapter 211, Acts of 1925) $75,000.00 

No expenditures 

Balance, Dec. 1. 1926 $75,000.00 

Stoneham-Wakefield Parkway 

Appropriation (Chapter 409, Acts of 1924) $5,000.00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1925 687.50 

$4,312.50 
Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Supplies and expenses 15.05 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $4,297.45* 

♦Reverted. 

West Roxbtjrt Parkway Extension 

Appropriation (Chapter 313, Acts of 1925) $222,000.00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1925 1,853.94 

$220,146.06 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Thomas J. McCue Const. Co $76,966.76 

Labor and materials 8,738.94 

$85,705.70 

Land 14,103.85 

Engineering: 

Services $6,709.53 

Supplies and expenses 30.01 

6,739.54 

Legal : 

Services 56.35 

Claims . . 1,500.00 

Advertising 56.25 

108,161.69 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $111,984.37 

Installation Electric Lighting System 

Appropriation (Chapter 79, Acts of 1926) $50,000.00 

Balance brought forward from 1925 appropriation to cover 1925 expenditures on 1926 books 16,651.50 

$66,651.50 

Expenditures 

Installation of conduits, etc.: 

Labor $19,559.01 

Materials 38,652.99 

$58,212.00 

Engineering: 

Services $587.34 

Supplies and expenses 45.44 

632.78 

58,844.78 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $7,806.72 

Resurfacing Boulevards and Parkways 
Appropriation (Chapter 79, Acts of 1926) $100,000.00 

Expenditures 
Furnace Brook Parkway: 
Construction: 

Contract, E. C. Sargent $2,278.23 

Labor and materials 4,556.47 

$6,834.70 

Engineering: 

Supplies and expenses 4.40 

$6,839.10 



56 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards — Specials — Continued 
Middlesex Fella Parkway: 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

Coleman Brothers . $5,660.39 

James Fannon .... 27,466.61 

$33,127.00 

Labor and materials 18,640.32 

$51,767.32 

Engineering: 

Services $1,973.60 

Supplies and expenses 28.02 

2,001.62 

Advertising bids 113.85 

$53,882.79 

Revere Beach Parkway: 

Construction: 

Contract, J. F. White Cont. Co $2,464.64 

Labor and materials 11,385.24 

$13,849.88 

Engineering: 

Services $126.30 

Supplies and expenses 7.20 

133.50 

13,983.38 

$74,705.27 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926. $25,294.73 

Qutncy Shore Roadway 
Appropriation (Chapter 79, Acts of 1926) $140,000.00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Paul Caputo $76,442.62 

Labor and materials 8,308.84 

■ $84,751.46 

Engineering: 

Services $1,190.50 

Supplies and expenses 54.56 

— 1,245.06 

85,996.52 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $54,003.48 

Land for Boulevards, Stoneham 

Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) $10,000.00 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Services $1,305.47 

Supplies and expenses 6.80 

1,312.27 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $8,687.73 

Old Colony Boulevard 
Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) $250,000.00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

Bay State Dredging Co $26,461.82 

Coleman Brothers, Inc 7,343.23 

$33,805.05 

Labor and materials .... .... 1,195.63 

$35,000.68 

Engineering: 

Services $767.40 

Supplies and expenses 72.35 

839.75 

Legal: 

Expenses 1.42 

35,841.85 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $214,158.15 

Western Avenue Boulevard 

Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) $70,000.00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Thomas J. McCue Const. Co. $25,915.58 

Labor and materials 3,039.54 

$28,955.12 

Engineering: 

Services $2,462.31 

& Supplies and expenses 4.35 

2,466.66 

Advertising bids 103.85 

m 31,525.63 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $38,474.37 

Cottage Farm Boulevard 
Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) $50,000.00 



P. D. 48 57 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards — Specials — Concluded 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Services $314.82 

Supplies and expenses 2.35 

$317.17 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $49,682.83 

Circumferential Highway 
Appropriation (Chapter 398, Acts of 1926) $115,000.00 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Services 360.00 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $114,640.00 

Charles River Basin Maintenance 

Appropriation, Dec. 1, 1925, to Dec. 1, 1926. . $200,000.00 

Balance brought forward from 1925 appropriation to cover 1925 expenditures on 1926 books 4,399.75 

$204,399.75 

Expenditures 
Park and Water Areas: 

Police $64,399.94 

Labor and teaming: 

General $37,864.37 

Road repairs 355.50 

38,219.87 

Street lighting 3,640.01 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $8,447.85 

Road repairs 97.02 

8,544.87 

$114,804.69 

Locks, Gates and Drawbridges: 

General labor $56,809.77 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 8,968.73 

65,778.50 

180,583.19 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $23,816.56 

Nantasket Beach Maintenance 

Appropriation, Dec. 1, 1925, to Dec. 1, 1926 $82,500.00 

Expenditures 

Police $26,029.75 

Labor and teaming: 

General $36,368.90 

Road repairs ........ 365.20 

$36,734.10 

Street lighting 1,646.08 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $13,031.86 

Road repairs 824.40 

13,856.26 

52,236.44 

78,266.19 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926. . $4,233.81 

Wellington Bridge Maintenance 

Appropriation, Dec. 1, 1925, to Dec. 1, 1926 $31,000.00 

Expenditures 

General labor $11,000.10 

Street lighting 1,609.92 

General supplies and miscellaneous expenses 1,903.59 

Repaving and repairing 15,000.00 

29,513.61 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $1,486.39 

Bunker Hill Maintenance 

Appropriation, Dec. 1, 1925, to Dec. 1, 1926 $10,500.00 

Balance brought forward from 1925 appropriation to cover 1925 expenditures on 1926 books 7.35 

$10,507.35 
Expenditures 

Police $4,129.69 

Labor and teaming: 

General . $4,698.75 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1,571.99 

6,270.74 

10,400.43 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $106.92 

Lighting of Bunker Hill Monument 

Appropriation $1,500.00 

Expenditures 
Installation of flood lighting: 

Labor $281.68 

Materials 1,196.81 

1,478.49 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $21.51 



58 P. D. 48 

ANALYSIS OF 1926 RECEIPTS 

Parks Division 
Credited to: 

Expense Fund $176,733.70 

General Revenue 4,507.50 

Previous years' accounts: 

Charles River Basin Maintenance $28.90 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards 34.65 

63.55 

$181,304.75 

BONDS, SINKING FUNDS AND NET DEBT 

Metropolitan Parks Construction, Series I. 
Bonds issued: 

Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 .... 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . . . $9,485,000.00 

$9,485,000.00 

Serial: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 . . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . . . $324,000.00 

324,000.00 

$9,809,000.00 

Serial bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 $13,750.00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 220,250.00 

234,000.00 

Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1926 $9,575,000.00 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 $5,654,500.89 

Total, Dec. 1, 1925 5,384,712.70 

Increase during 1926 269.788.19 

Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 $3,920,499.11 

Total, Dec. 1, 1925 4,204,037.30 

Decrease during 1926 283,538.19 

Metropolitan Parks Construction, Series II. 
Bonds issued: 

Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 .... 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . . . $2,567,500.00 

$2,567,500.00 

Serial : 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 . . . $337,500.00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . . . 2,036,437.50 

2,373,937.50 

$4,941,437.50 

Serial bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 $95,937.50 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 481,687.50 

577,625.00 

Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1926 4,363,812.50 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 $1,435,951.37 

Total, Dec. 1, 1925 1,367,193.39 

Increase during 1926 68,757.98 

Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 $2,927,861.13 

Total, Dec. 1, 1925 2,755,056.61 

— »-■ — ■ — 

Increase during 1926 172,804.52 

Charles River Basin Construction 
Bonds issued: 

Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 . . . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . . . $4,125,000.00 

$4,125,000.00 

Serial: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 . . . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . . . $375,000.00 

375,000.00 

$4,500,000.00 

Serial bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 $10,000.00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 132,000.00 

142,000.00 

Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1926 4,358,000.00 



P. D. 48 59 

Bonds, Sinking Funds and Net Debt — Concluded 
Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 $1,817,269.44 

Total, Dec. 1, 1925 1,647,740.17 

Increase during 1926 $169,529.27 

Net Debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 $2,540,730.56 

Total, Dec. 1, 1925 2,720,259.83 

Decrease during 1926 179,529.27 

Charles River Bridges Construction 

Notes issued: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 $200,000.00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 1,000,000.00 1,200,000.00 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 . 1,000,000.00 

Notes outstanding: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 200,000.00 

Net debt, Dec. 1, 1926 $200,000.00 

SEWERAGE DIVISION 

CONSTRUCTION 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION FUND, NORTH SYSTEM 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $8,288,500.00 

Receipts: 

For period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 $87,514.78 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1926 783.84 

88,298.62 

$8,376,798.62 
Expenditures 
General: 

Adjustment a/c previous years $39.68 

Sewer in Medford and Arlington: 
Construction: 
Contracts: 

A. Baruffaldi Co. ... $69,021.98 
Antony Cefalo .... 49,272.79 

$118,294.77 

Labor and materials 8,545.22 

$126,839.99 

Land . # 500.00 

Engineering: 

Services $16,498.84 

Supplies and expenses 1,055.23 

17,554.07 

Legal: 

Services: $162.83 

Expenses 15.69 

178.52 

City of Medford, damages a/c construction of sewer . . . 3,350.00 

Claims 500.00 

Advertising bids 94.70 

Printing contracts 123.17 

149,140.45 

Sewer in Reading, Winchester and Woburn: 

Land $1,000.00 

Legal: 

Services $7.31 

Expenses 6.29 

13.60 

1,363.60 

$150,543.73 
Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 7,964.118.39 

8,114,662.12 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $262,136.50 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION FUND, SOUTH SYSTEM 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $10,002,912.00 

Receipts: 

For period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 $24,599.61 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1926 

24,599.61 

$10,027,511.61 
Expenditures 

Adjustment, a/o previous years $193.61 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 10,004,458.98 

10,004,652.59 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $22,859.02 



60 

Miscellaneous 

Surface Drainage in Malden, Everett and Revere 
Appropriation 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Servicea $429.03 

Supplies and expenses .• 71.50 

$500.53 

Consulting engineers 1,582.60 

Legal : 

Services $607.90 

Expenses 201.30 

809.20 



P. D. 48 



$70,000.00 



2,892.33 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926. 



$67,107.67 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE MAINTENANCE FUND, NORTH SYSTEM — GENERAL 

Appropriation. Dec. 1, 1925, to Dec. 1, 1926 $342,200.00 

Balance brought forward from 1925 appropriation to cover 1925 expenditures on 1926 books 21,560.67 



Expenditures 

Administration : 
Salaries: 

Commissioners $1,583.31 

Secretary and clerks 2,716.67 

Chief engineer and assistants .... 7,863.32 

$12,163.30 

Rent, light and heat 1,356.80 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses ...... 898.21 

Printing 130.05 

Engineering supplies and expenses 165.14 

Industrial Accident compensation 1,970.00 

Miscellaneous 19.52 

Deer Island Pumping Station: 

Labor $33,492.26 

Fuel 13,716.09 

Oil, waste and packing 1,056.62 

Water 1,386.00 

Repairs, ordinary 9.85 

Repairs and renewals 1,787.25 

General supplies 579.02 

Miscellaneous expenses 199.58 

New wharf at Deer Island 4,845.00 

East Boston Pumping Station: 

Labor $39,372.38 

Fuel 18,262.70 

Oil, waste and packing 1,010.40 

Water 1,995.84 

Repairs and renewals 3,391.29 

General supplies 1,186.03 

Miscellaneous expenses 499.33 

Charlestown Pumping Station: 

Labor $25,602.33 

Fuel 8,328.37 

Oil, waste and packing 689.38 

Water 593.34 

Repairs and renewals ; . . . 467.43 

General supplies 182.39 

Miscellaneous expenses 243.17 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station: 

Labor $12,616.36 

Fuel 3,225.38 

Oil, waste and packing 341.21 

Water . 854.04 

Repairs and renewals 210.21 

General supplies 40.19 

Miscellaneous expenses 71.11 

Reading Pumping Station: 

Labor $6,713.40 

Fuel 103.29 

Oil, waste and packing 3.40 

Repairs and renewals 113.19 

General supplies 3,247.92 

Miscellaneous expenses 519.39 

Sewer Lines, Buildings and Grounds: 

Engineering assistants $3,899.17 

Labor . . 58,117.68 

Automobile supplies and repairs 961.45 

Brick, cement and lime 1,080.82 

Castings, iron work, etc 2,233.08 

Freight, express and teaming 65.63 

Fuel and lighting 51.74 



$363,760.67 



$16,703.02 



57,071.67 



65,717.97 



36,106.41 



17,358.50 



10,700.59 



P. D. 48 



61 



Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, North System — General — Concluded 



Repairs, ordinary 
Repairs and renewals 
Lumber, paint, etc. 
Machinery, tools and appliances 
Rubber and oiled goods 
Sand, gravel and stone 
General supplies . 
Miscellaneous expenses 
Deer Island Ferry 

Stables: 
Labor .... 
Hay, grain and bedding 
Vehicles, harnesses, etc. 
Miscellaneous expenses 



$1,101.12 

2.75 

3,112.35 

321.80 

288.14 

608.46 

3,308.35 

4,224.36 

666.66 



82,550.00 

513.30 

11.76 

188.54 



$80,043.56 



3,263.60 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE MAINTENANCE FUND, NORTH SYSTEM 

Mill Bkook Valley Sewer 
Appropriation ................ 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1925 



$286,965.32 
$76,795.35 
SPECIAL 



$30,000.00 
28,616.21 



Engineering: 
Salaries 



Expenditures 



$1,383.79 
1,090.00 



$293.79* 



♦Reverted. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE MAINTENANCE FUND, SOUTH SYSTEM — GENERAL 



Appropriation, Dec. 1, 1925 to Dec. 1, 1926 

Balance brought forward from 1925 appropriation to cover 1925 expenditures on 1926 books 



Administration : 
Salaries: 

Commissioners. 

Secretary and clerks 

Chief engineer and assistants 



Expenditures 



$208,000.00 
14,705.49 

$222,705.49 



$916.69 
2,548.33 
5,143.36 



Rent, light and heat 
Stationery, office supplies and expenses 
Printing . . . . 
Engineering supplies and expenses . 
Industrial Accident compensation . 
Miscellaneous 



$8,608.38 

1,199.18 

432.62 

149.81 

33.57 

225.00 

8.51 



Ward Street Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Fuel .... 

Oil, waste and packing 

Water ... 

Repairs, ordinary 

Repairs and renewals 

General supplies .... 

Miscellaneous expenses 



$42,995.46 

18,816.28 

1,353.45 

2,364.12 

116.30 

4,672.66 

1,084.10 

538.99 



$10,657.07 



Quincy Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing 

Water 

Repairs and renewals 
General supplies . 
Miscellaneous expenses 



$13,213.60 

5,861.02 

398.61 

438.63 

82.13 

179.04 

78.08 



71,941.36 



Nut Island Screen House: 
Labor .... 
Fuel .... 
Oil, waste and packing 
Water .... 
Repairs and renewals 
General supplies . 
Miscellaneous expenses 



Sewer Lines, Buildings and Grounds: 
Engineering assistants .... 

Labor . . . . . . 

Automobile supplies and repairs 

Brick, cement and lime .... 

Castings, iron work, etc 

Freight, express and teaming . 

Fuel and lighting 

Repairs, ordinary 



$14,612.95 
2,507.47 
218.97 
453.13 
458.45 
390.36 
113.62 



20,251.11 



18,754.95 



$6,460.50 

39,519.88 

3,151.90 

59.17 

293.80 

24.58 

23.52 

2,104.57 



62 



Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, South System — General — Concluded 



P. D. 48 



Lumber, paint, etc. 
Machinery, tools and appliances 
Rubber and oiled goods 
Sand, gravel and stone 
General supplies . 
Miscellaneous expenses 
Pumping by City of Boston 



Stables : 
Labor . . . . 
Hay, grain and bedding 
Vehicles, harnesses, etc. 
Miscellaneous expenses 



$394.60 

99.04 

28.52 

97.35 

1,408.70 

2,457.47 

10,300.00 



$1,125.00 
324.67 
108.20 
119.11 



$66,423.60 



1,676.98 



Balance, Dec. 1, 1926. 



ANALYSIS OF 1926 RECEIPTS 

Sewerage Division 
Credited to: 

Metropolitan Sewerage Construction Fund, North System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Interest Fund, North System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Interest Fund, South System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Sinking Fund, North System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, North System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, South System 

Total for year ending Nov. 30, 1926 .... 



$783.84 

20.79 

21.01 

227.26 

173.49 

364.95 



BONDS, SINKING FUNDS AND NET DEBT 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION, NORTH SYSTEM 

Bonds issued: 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 . . . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . . . $6,563,000.00 

$6,563,000.00 

Serial : 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 .... 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . . . $1,725,500.00 

1,725,500.00 

$8,288,500.00 

Serial bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 $95,500.00 



Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 359,000.00 



454,500.00 



Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1926 



Sinking Fund: 
Total, Dec. 1, 1926 
Total, Dec. 1, 1925 



$5,184,030.57 
4,822,233.54 



Increase during 1926 



Net debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 
Total, Dec. 1, 1925 



$2,649,969.43 
3,107,266.46 



Decrease during 1926 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION. SOUTH SYSTEM 



Bonds issued: 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 

Serial: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 



Serial bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 
Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 



Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1926 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 . 
Total, Dec. 1, 1925 . 



$8,877,912.00 



-$8,877,912.00 



$1,125,000.00 



1,125,000.00 



$10,002,912.00 



$32,000.00 
243,000.00 



275,000.00 



$189,705.07 
$33,000.42 



$1,591.34 



$7,834,000.00 



$361,797.03 



$457,297.03 



$3,421,007.25 
3,129,165.16 



Increase during 1926 



Net debt: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 
Total, Dec. 1, 1925 



$9,727,912.00 



$291,842.09 



$6,306,904.75 
6,630,746.84 



Decrease during 1926 



$323,842.09 



P. D. 48 63 

WATER DIVISION 

CONSTRUCTION 

METROPOLITAN WATER CONSTRUCTION FUND 

Total amount appropriated to Dec. 1, 1925 $46,405,000.00 

Chapter 79, Acta of 1926 250,000.00 

Chapter 398, Acts of 1926 50,000.00 

$46,705,000.00 
Receipts: 

For period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . $290,379.65 

For the year ending Nov. 30, 1926 14,113.13 

304,492.78 

$47,009,492.78 
Expenditures 
General : 

Miscellaneous (a/c adjustment) $243.86 

Certain Improvements: 
Additional Machinery at Spot Pond : 

Contract, Worthington Pump & Machinery Corp. . . . $20,000.00 
Engineering: 

Services $760.73 

SuppUes and expenses 33.63 

794.36 

Labor 711.21 

21,505.57 

Improving Wachusett Watershed: 

Land $47,459.00 

Legal : 

Services $382.86 

Expenses 7.20 

390.06 

47,849.06 

Low Service Pipe Lines, Section 51: 

Construction : 
Contracts : 

C. & R. Const. Co. < . $45,270.90 

George M. Bryne . . . 10,490.25 

,$55,761.15 

Labor and materials, stock 6,958.71 

$62,719.86 

Engineering: 

Services $1,640.39 

Supplies and expenses 112.64 

1,753.03 

Labor 1,303.81 

65,776.70 

Southern High Service: 

Engineering: 

Services $5,880.01 

Supplies and expenses 527.99 

$6,408.00 

Labor 10.00 

Advertising 22.90 

Printing 71.12 

6,512.02 

Northern High Service, Section 48: 
Construction : 

Contract, Cenedella Co $54,528.20 

Labor and materials 1,034.20 

$55,562.40 

Engineering: 

Services $7,750.57 

Supplies and expenses 356.84 

8,107.41 

Labor 2,799.19 

Land 4,016.00 

Legal : 

Services 50.00 

70,535.00 

Meters and Connections: 

Labor $805.63 

Materials 498.15 

1,303.78 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 10: 
Construction: 

Contract, C. & R., Const. Co $6,548.92 

Labor and materials 4,039.97 

$10,588.89 

Engineering: 

Services $1,241.72 

Supplies and expenses 7.25 

1,248.97 

Labor - 585.79 

Land 800.00 

Legal : 

Services 26.06 

13,249.71 



64 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Water Construction Fund — Concluded 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 11: 
Construction : 

Contract, T. A. Gillespie $29, 165.36 

Labor and materials ...... 5,390.08 

$34,555.44 

Engineering: 

Services $1,059.59 

Supplies and expenses 113.20 

1,172.79 

Labor 131.22 

$35,859.45 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 12: 

Construction: 

Contract, C. & R. Const. Co $78,299.03 

Labor and materials 2,444.40 

$80,743.43 

Engineering: 

Services $4,656.57 

Supplies and expenses 314.81 

4,971.38 

Labor 1,141.78 

Land 950.00 

Claims 550.00 

Legal 2.15 

$88,358.74 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Watertown Branch: 

Construction: 

Contract, C. & R. Const. Co $56,281.90 

Labor and materials . . . - . . . 289.86 

$56,571.76 

Engineering: 

Services $6,591.11 

Supplies and expenses 339.79 

6,930.90 

Labor 370.77 

Advertising 44.10 

Printing 136.22 

64,053.75 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section A: 

Engineering: 

Services $646.73 

Supplies and expenses .97 

$647.70 

Labor 15.26 

662.96 

Stock not distributed 682.63 

$416,593.23 
Less stock transferred to other accounts 7,011.61 

$409,581.62 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1925 46,249,819.88 

$46,659,401.50 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $350,091.28 

METROPOLITAN WATER MAINTENANCE FUND — GENERAL 

Appropriation, Dec. 1, 1925, to Dec. 1, 1926 . $802,445.00 

Balance brought forward from 1925 appropriation to cover 1925 expenditures on 1926 books 34,407.06 

$836,852.06 
Expenditures 
Administration : 
Salaries: 

Commissioners $2,500.00 

Secretary and clerks 6,056.32 

Chief engineer and assistants .... 25,381.74 

$33,938.06 

Rent, light and heat 2,386.48 

Stationery, office supplies and expenses 3,138.87 

Printing 363.63 

Engineering supplies and expenses 4,534.93 

Biological laboratory: 

Labor $2,537.74 

Supplies and expenses 381 .74 

2,919.48 

Payments in lieu of taxes 53,445.53 

Industrial Accident compensation 1,816.07 

Miscellaneous 218.13 

$102,761.18 

Wachusett Department 

Superintendence : 

Labor $10,116.24 

Supplies and expenses 1,153.43 

$11,269.67 

Reservoir: 

Labor $22,803.67 

Supplies and expenses 4,626.82 

27,403.49 



P. D. 48 65 

Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund — General — Continued 

Forestry: 

Labor $9,887.97 

Supplies and expenses 759.46 

$10,647.43 

Protection of supply: 

Labor $5,844.14 

Supplies and expenses 1,685.03 

7,529.17 

Buildings and grounds: 

Labor $4,271.32 

Supplies and expenses 1,578.81 

5,850.13 

Wachusett Dam: 

Labor $9,745.68 

Supplies and expenses 1,398.62 

11,144.30 

Wachusett Aqueduct: 

Labor $9,705.75 

Supplies and expenses 1,574.78 

11,280.53 

Clinton Sewerage System: 

Pumping Station: 

Labor $1,068.02 

Repairs and supplies . . . 263.78 

$1,331.80 

Sewers, screens and filter beds: 

Labor $7,618.95 

Repairs and supplies . . . 1,794.18 

9,413.13 

10,744.93 

Sanitary inspection: 

Labor v . $1,346.62 

Supplies and expenses 456.33 

1,802.95 

Swamp drainage: 

Labor $12,683.45 

Supplies and expenses 3,594.55 

16,278.00 

Power plant: 

Labor $9,605.31 

Supplies and expenses 6,106.34 

15,711.65 

Wachusett-Sudbury Power Transmission Line: 

Supplies and expenses 46.57 

$129,735.82 

Sudbury Department: 
Superintendence : 

Labor $11,681.80 

Supplies and expenses 1,629.72 

$13,311.52 

Ashland Reservoir: 

Labor $3,982.82 

Supplies and expenses 224.81 

4,207.63 

Hopkinton Reservoir: 

Labor $3,039.83 

Supplies and expenses 288.89 

3,328.72 

Whitehall Reservoir: 

Labor $4,347.06 

Supplies and expenses 15.32 

4,362.38 

Framingham Reservoirs, 1, 2 and 3: 

Labor $12,923.91 

Supplies and expenses 2,107.09 

15,031.00 

Sudbury Reservoir: 

Labor $17,181.34 

Supplies and expenses 2,489.46 

19,670.80 

Lake Cochituate: 

Labor $10,047.60 

Supplies and expenses 1,230.45 

11,278.05 

Marlboro Brook filters: 

Labor $4,242.72 

Supplies and expenses 285.70 

4,528.42 

Pegan filters: 

Labor $5,879.59 

Supplies and expenses 642.31 

6,521.90 

Sudbury and Cochituate Watersheds: 

Labor $2,315.50 

Supplies and expenses 176.49 

2,491.99 

Sanitary inspection: 

Labor $4,275.88 

Supplies and expenses 297.01 

4,572.89 



66 

Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund — General — Continued 

Cochituate Aqueduct: 

Labor $4,322.60 

Supplies and expenses . .' . . . 376.41 

$4,699.01 

Sudbury Aqueduct: 

Labor $9,016.00 

Supplies and expenses 984.68 

10,000.68 

Western Aqueduct: 

Labor * $8,382.06 

Supplies and expenses 1,051.76 

9,433.82 

Forestry : 

Labor $6,289.75 

Supplies and expenses 115.65 

6,405.40 

Sudbury power plant: 

Labor $12,450.72 

Supplies and expenses 558.87 

13,009.59 

$132,853.80 

Distribution Department 
Superintendence : 

Labor $11,685.96 

Supplies and expenses 1,143.40 

$12,829.36 

Fisher Hill Reservoir: 

Labor $2,251.46 

Supplies and expenses 278.50 

2,529.96 

Bellevue Reservoir: 

Labor $202.50 

Supplies and expenses 128.23 

330.73 

Arlington Reservoir: 

Labor $369.25 

Supplies and expenses 128.50 

497.75 

Bear Hill Reservoir: 

Labor $414.50 

Supplies and expenses 41.88 

456.38 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds: 

Labor $14,648.45 

Supplies and expenses 3,619.96 

18,268.41 

Fells Reservoir: 

Labor $1,506.19 

Supplies and expenses 119.48 

1,625.67 

Forbes Hill Reservoir: 

Labor $1,664.84 

Supplies and expenses 172.94 

1,837.78 

Mystic Lake, Conduit and Pumping Station : 

Labor $1,554.50 

Supplies and expenses 3,697.43 

5,25 1 .93 

Mystic Reservoir: 

Labor „ $1,998.50 

Supplies and expenses 493.50 

2,492.00 

Waban Hill Reservoir: 

Labor $255.00 

Supplies and expenses 91.29 

346.29 

Weston Reservoir: 

Labor $5,569.47 

Supplies and expenses 927.27 

6,496.74 

Spot Pond: 

Labor $9,158.70 

Supplies and expenses 1,164.42 

10,323.12 

Buildings at Spot Pond: 

Labor $803.34 

Supplies and expenses 566.67 

1,370.01 

Low Service Pipe Lines: 

Labor $45,925.77 

Supplies and expenses 11,933.10 

57,858.87 

Northern High Service Pipe Lines: 

Labor $13,135.70 

Supplies and expenses 42,135.64 

55,271.34 

Northern Extra High Service Pipe Lines: 

Labor $63.25 

Supplies and expenses 15.44 

78.69 



P. D. 48 



P. D. 48 67 

Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund — General — Concluded 
Southern High Service Pipe Lines: 

Labor $10,851.61 

Supplies and expenses 2,165.09 

$13,016.70 

Southern Extra High Service Pipe Lines: 

Labor $2,686.68 

Supplies and expenses 3,020.91 

5,707.59 

Supply Pipe Lines: 

Labor $5,562.21 

Supplies and expenses 1,421.47 

6,983.68 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir: 

Labor $6,272.50 

Supplies and expenses 942.80 

7,215.30 

Chestnut Hill Pipe Yard: 

Labor U, 126.60 

Supplies and expenses 178.45 

4,305.05 

Glenwood Pipe Yard and buildings: 

Labor $4,294.59 

Supplies and expenses 920.41 

5,215.00 

Stables and garages: 

Labor $3,574.14 

Supplies and expenses 4,963.00 

8,537.14 

Venturi meters: 

Labor $1,625.62 

Supplies and expenses 17.54 

1,643.16 

Measurement of water: 

Labor $3,272.96 

Supplies and expenses 630.76 

3,903.72 

Arlington Pumping Station, buildings and grounds: 

Labor $904.97 

Supplies and expenses .;.... 22.60 

927.57 

Hyde Park Buildings and grounds: 

Labor $382.34 

Supplies and expenses 21.64 

403.98 

$235,723.92 

Less stock transferred 599.43 

$235,124.49 

Pumping Service: 
Superi ntendence : 

Labor $7,971.90 

Supplies and expenses 733.20 

$8,705.10 

Arlington Pumping Station: 

Labor $12,487.38 

Supplies and expenses 4,110.55 

16,597.93 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2: 

Labor $50,715.18 

Supplies and expenses 28,687.17 

79,402.35 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1: 

Labor $25,844.17 

Supplies and expenses 14,655.46 

40,499.63 

Spot Pond Pumping Station: 

Labor $16,625.57 

Supplies and expenses 13,690.42 

30,315.99 

Hyde Park Pumping Station: 

Labor $9,313.78 

Supplies and expenses 2,828.68 

12,142.46 

187,663.46 $788,138.75 

Balance, Dec. 1, 1926 $48,713.31 

METROPOLITAN WATER MAINTENANCE FUND — SPECIAL 

Filtration of Water 

Appropriation $25,000.00 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1925 23,280.78 

$1,719.22 

Expenditure* 
Engineering: 

Services $1,682.78 

Supplies and expenses 36.44 

$1,719.22 



68 P. D. 48 

ANALYSIS OF 1926 RECEIPTS 

Wateb Division 
Credited to: 

Metropolitan Water Construction Fund $14,113.13 

Metropolitan Water Interest Fund 68.82 

Metropolitan Water Construction Sinking Fund 105,105.16 

Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund 3,099.37 

$122,386.48 

Bonds, Sinking Funds and Net Debt 

Metropolitan Water Construction 
Bonds issued: 
M 
Sinking Fund: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 . . . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . . $41,398,000.00 

$41,398,000.00 

Serial: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 . . 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 . . . $4,287,000.00 

4,287,000.00 

$45,685,000.00 

Serial bonds paid: 

Year ending Nov. 30, 1926 $115,000.00 

Period prior to Dec. 1, 1925 507,000.00 

622,000.00 

Bonds outstanding Dec. 1, 1926 $45,063,000.00 

Sinking Fund: 

Total, Dec. 1, 1926 $23,571,873.99 

Total, Dec. 1, 1925 22,478,585.22 

Increase during 1926 $1,093,288.77 

Net debt: 

' Total, Dec. 1, 1926 $21,491,126.01 

Total, Dec. 1, 1925 22,699,414.78 

Decrease during 1926 $1,208,288.77 



70 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 1 



Contracts made and pending during the 





Number 




Number 






of 


WORK 


of 


Lowest 




Contract 




Bids 




1 


89 


Grading and other work, North Avenue to Lowell Street, 
Quannapowitt Parkway, Wakefield. 


17 


$35,308 00 


2 


90 


Grading, surfacing, building bridge and other work near 
Pope's Hill Station, Old Colony Parkway. 


5 


118,971 80 


3 


91 


Building reinforced concrete shore protection and recon- 
struction of roadway, Hancock Street to Fenno Street, 
Quincy Shore Reservation. 


11 


250,740 00 


4 


92 


Building bridge and retaining walls over Boston & Maine 
Railroad near Medford Street, Somerville, Northern Traf- 
fic Artery. 

Building reinforced concrete bridge over the Charles River, 


11 


202,271 00 


5 


93 


6 


160,845 00 






opposite DeWolfe Street, Cambridge (John W. Weeks 










Bridge) . 






6 


94 


Grading, surfacing and other work, Weld Street to Newton 
Street, West Roxbury Parkway. 


9 


74,215 00 


7 


95 


Grading, surfacing and other work, Western Avenue and 
Arsenal Street Bridges. 


6 


18,000 00 


8 


96 


Repaving and repairing Wellington Bridge, Middlesex Fells 
Parkway. 


9 


23,925 00 


9 


97 


Grading, surfacing and other work, Lechmere Square to 
Boston & Maine Bridge, Northern Artery, Cambridge. 


12 


287,523 00 


10 


98 


Grading, surfacing and other work, Boston & Maine Rail- 
road Bridge to Mystic Avenue, Northern Artery, Somer- 
ville. 

Rebuilding retaining wall northerly from Broad Canal, 


10 


224,303 00 


11 


99 


5 


53,175 00 






Lower Basin Section. 






12 


99A 


Rebuilding retaining wall at Bay State Road Extension. 




Extra Order 


13 


100 


Excavating and grading near approaches to Cottage Farm 
Bridge. 


8 


7,800 00 


14 


101 


Surfacing westerly roadway Forest Street to Elm Street, 
Middlesex Fells Parkway to Highland Avenue, Medford, 
and section of South Border Road. 


4 


22,420 00 


15 


102 


Grading, surfacing and other work, Boston & Maine Bridge 
to Mystic Avenue, Somerville. 


9 


204,591 SO 


16 


103 


Grading, surfacing and other work, North Harvard Street 
to Western Avenue, Boston. 


7 


40,054 00 


17 


62 


Building bridges over Charles River at Essex Street and 
Brookline Street, Cottage Farm Bridges. 


5 


1,118,350 00 



P. D. 48 



71 



Appendix No. 1 



Year 1926 — Parks Division 



Contractor 


Date of 

Contract 


Date of 

Completion of 

Contract 


Value of 

Work done 

December 31, 

1926 


Greenough Construction Company. 


Feb. 11, 1926 


June 18, 1926 


$29,127 44 


Coleman Bros., Inc. 


Sept. 23, 1926 




33,739 79 


Paul Caputo. 


May 13, 1926 


Nov. 24, 1926 


228,186 81 


Coleman Bros., Inc. 


May 20, 1926 




226,126 09 


T. Stuart & Son Co. 


July 1, 1926 




194,408 46 


Thos. J. McCue Construction Co. 


May 13, 1926 


Nov. 24, 1926 


100,548 27 


Simpson Bros. Corp. 


May 20, 1926 


June 8, 1926 


11,563 03 


Simpson Bros. Corp. 


May 20, 1926 


July 21, 1926 


21,419 74 


Coleman Bros. Inc. 


June 10, 1926 




343,428 51 


James H. Fannon. 


Bids rejected. 






Bay State Dredging & Contracting Co. 


July 15, 1926 




32,895 14 


Bay State Dredging & Contracting Co. 
J. F. White Contracting Company. 


Oct. 22, 1926 
July 15, 1926 


Dec. 2, 1926 


8,979 14 
3,373 50 


James H. Fannon. 


July 29, 1926 


Nov. 20, 1926 


34,812 76 


Coleman Bros., Inc. 


July 29, 1926 




173,035 78 


Thos. J. McCue Construction Company. 


Sept. 9, 1926 




39,730 66 


T. Stuart & Son Co. 


Oct. 28, 1926 




12,498 50 



72 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 2 



Contracts made and pending during the 

(The details of Contracts made before 



Num- 
ber of 
Con- 
tract 
Jl 

351 



48 1 



50i 



54 



55 



21-M 



23-M 1 



25-Mi 



WORK 



Building and erecting pump 
ing engine for Spot Pond 
Pumping Station. 



Furnishing and laying 60-inch 
riveted steel water pipes in 
Arlington and Somerville. 



Furnishing and laying 38-inch 
riveted steel water pipes in 
Maiden, Melrose and Stone 
ham. 

Furnishing and laying 30-inch 
riveted steel water pipes in 
Boston, Cambridge, Wal 
tham and Watertown. 



Furnishing water valves: 10 12- 
inch, 10 16-inch, 4 20-inch, 2 
24-inch, 2 30-inch and 8 36- 
inch screw lift valves and 3 
36-inch hydraulic lift valves 

Sale and cutting of chestnut 
and miscellaneous standing 
timber on marginal lands of 
of the Wachusett Reservoir 



Cleaning of Mystic water 
mains. 



Repairing roofs of Department 
buildings in Somerville and 
Medford. 



Num- 
ber of 
Bids 



Amount of Bid 



Next to 
Lowest 



5 

Lowest 



$69,000 00* 


206,921 40 
(for Lock- 
bar steel 


pipe.) 


153,580 00 


101,471 00 


38,603 00 


5,000 003 


s 

3,280 00 



$67,470 00 



205,775 00» 



141,325 002 



79,855 002 



27,575 00» 



9,750 002, 4 



2,982 002 



6 



Contractor 



Worthington Pump & 
Machinery Corporation, 
New York, N. Y. 



C. & R. Construction Co. 
Boston, Mass. 



Cenedella & Co., Milford, 

Mass. 



C. & R. Construction Co., 
Boston, Mass. 



Feil Manufacturing Co., 
Chicago, 111. 



Wilder, Walker & Davis 
Co., Sterling, Mass. 



National Water Main 
Cleaning Co., New York, 

N. Y. 

Everett F. Penshorn, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 2 



Year 1926 — Water Division 

1926 have been given in previous reports.) 



73 



Date of 
Contract. 



Oct. 18, 1923 



May 26, 1925 



July 30, 1925 



July 20, 1926 



Sept. 16, 1926 



8 

Date of 

Completion 
of Contract. 



Oct. 18, 1926 



June 16, 1926 



Sept. 18, 1926 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



See annual report for 1923. 



See annual report for 1925. 



Dec. 


7, 


1923 


May 27, 


1925 


Nov. 


14, 


1925 



June 9, 1926 



May 5, 1926 



See annual report for 1925. 



For furnishing and laying 30-inch riveted steel pipe at 
bridges and culverts, $11.00 per lin. ft.; for furnishing 
and laying 30-inch riveted steel pipe, $10.75 per lin. ft.; 
for rock excavation, $6.00 per cu. yd.; for chambers 
for valves, $80.00 per chamber; for concrete masonry, 
$10.00 per cu. yd.; for bituminous macadam resur- 
facing in streets, $1.00 per sq. yd. 

12-inch screw lift valves, $87.50, 16-inch, $205.00, 20- 
inch, $320.00, 24-inch, $575.00, 30-inch, $1,250.00, 
36-inch, $1,670.00 per valve; 36 inch hydraulic lift 
valves, $2,120 per valve. 



See annual report for 1923. 



See annual report for 1925. 



See annual report for 1925. 



10 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1926 



$68,300 00 



228,229 28 



144,096 25 



81,875 00 



19,000 00 



9,650 00 



2,023 30 
3.342 00 



74 



P. D. 48 
Contracts made and pending during the 



1 


2 
WORK 


3 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids 


Amount of Bid 


6 


Num- 
ber of 
Con- 
tract. 


4 

Next to 
Lowest 


5 

Lowest 


Contractor 


27-Mi 
28-Mi 

29-Mi 
51-M 

Agree- 
ment 


Rewinding etator ooila of gen- 
erator No. 2, Wachusett 
Power Station. 

Laying 20-inch cast-iron pipe 
furnished by the Common- 
wealth and furnishing and 
laying 20-inch, 16-inch and 
12-inch sand-molded, cast- 
iron, cement-lined water 
pipes in Lynn. 

Protective equipment at Sud- 
bury Power Station. 

Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Wachusett Dam in Clinton. 

Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Sudbury Dam in South- 
borough. 


2 
4 

2 

1 

— 6 


$4,177 502 
(For furnish- 
ing new coils) 

$37,982 00 

$1,378 00 
« 


$2,100 00 

(For reinsu- 

lating old 

coils) 

$34,574 00» 

$1,241 34* 

$5.30 per 
M kilowatt 
hours. 




Westinghouse Electric & 
Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Boston, Mass. 

C. & R. Construction Com- 
pany, Boston, Mass. 

Westinghouse Electric <fe 
Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Boston, Mass. 

New England Power Com- 
pany and Edison Elec- 
tric Illuminating Com- 
pany of Boston. 

Edison Electric Illuminat- 
ing Company of Boston. 



Contract completed. 
Contract based upon this bid. 
Next to highest bid. 
Highest bid. 

Competitive bids were not received. 

Sale of energy continued since January 1, 1922 at same price as formerly under modified extension of 
Contract No. 39-M. 



P. D. 48 

Year 1926 — Water Division — Continued 



75 



7 


8 


9 


10 


Date of 
Contract 


Date of 
Completion 
of Contract 


Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 


Value of 
Work done 
Dec. 31, 1926 


May 12, 1926 


Sept. 13, 1926 


For rewinding stator complete, $3,920; for furnishing 10 
spare stator coils, $25.75 each. 


$4,177 50 


July 20, 1926 


Dec. 1, 1926 


For laying 20-inch cast-iron pipe furnished by the Com- 
monwealth, $3.50 per lin. ft.; for furnishing and laying 
20-inch, sand-molded, cast-iron, cement-lined pipe 
$9.50 per lin. ft.; for furnishing and laying 16-inch 
sand-molded, cast-iron, cement-lined pipe, $7.30 
per lin. ft.; for furnishing and relaying 12-inch, sand- 
molded, cement-lined, cast-iron pipe, $5.25 per lin. ft.; 
for rock excavation above grade, $6.00 per cu. yd.; for 
rock excavation below grade, $10.00 per cu. yd.; for 
earth excavation below grade, $3.00 per cu. yd.; for 
chambers for valves, $80.00 per chamber; for concrete 
masonry, $10.00 per cu. yd.; for bituminous macadam 
resurfacing in streets, $1.00 per sq. yd. 


$40,023 23 


Oct. 5, 1926 


Nov. 20, 1926 


For replacing 2,300 volt oil circuit breakers on generators 
Nos. 1, 2 and 3, complete, $1,241.34. 


$1,241 34 


Jan. 13, 1917 


— 


See annual report for 1917. 


358,189 24 


Jan. 1, 1922 


— 


See annual report for 1922. 


163,424 03 



76 P. D. 48 

Contracts made and pending during the Year 1926 — Water Division 

Concluded 
Summary of Contracts 1895 to 1926 inclusive 1 



Distribution Section, 4 contracts 
Pumping Service, 1 contract . 



450 contracts completed from 1896 to 1925, inclusive 



Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston, 
Total of 455 contracts 



Value of 
Work done Dec. 
31, 1926 



$473,200 53 
68,300 00 

$541,500 53 
20,112,850 31 

$20,654,350 84 
512,000 00 

$20,142,350 84 



1 In this summary contracts for the sale of used material and contracts charged to maintenance are 
excluded. 



P. D. 48 



77 



CO 



Q 
% 

Oh 

<1 









5- 
•8 

C3 



a. 



© 



to 

5- 



to 



•s 



NO 



o 

a 

m 

«< 
H 



spnoj, 



jaqraaosQ 



jaquiaAo^j 



jaqo^oQ 



laqraa^dag 



^snSny 



Xinf 



eunp 



Acj^ 



II jd V 



qojuj^ 



iQBnjqaj 



AjBTlOBf 



a 
o 

< 
j 



00(000 


00 CUC OS '-' <N CO 
N ■<»< 00 OS ■* 00 CM 


OS i-l »H 

Tf eo ** 


ooconoc 

CO** CO CO 


^ Tf ** ^ **< JO ** 


can 

TCO *3< 



T3 

o 
X! 
c/. 
i- 

— 
c8 



BE 
3 

r. 



iO CO 00 CO 0000fOi-H>OO5i-i CDOM 

wcC'i-H'-h oaoHMhH ono 

CO '*'*«* CO CO ** *# CO CO «* »#»#tJ< 

HOONrt COCNN-CNO^OO b- CN t- 

»- CO ift CN HCCCOiOiOM OCOCN 

iO CO rfi >C iO iO iO lO ** ** 1< »0 iO »0 

LO>*r^o aoi^ce^Nco r>- cs t» 

COr^rJHIM iO CO 00 OS O t>- CO i-iCOt>» 

iC"*'*'* co co co co co co »* *#"fco 

COcOt^O CN Tf< CD OS CM CO -H CSCOO 

»tfi CO CN "*< COLOi-HkOCO»-H'* CO rt< *# 

»#COOOO 00 i-i O »C OS O 'H lOOH 

COCOt^iO CO CN CO 00 "3 X CO »-HCSK5 

CNCOCNCN lO iO "0 iO *# CO CO •* CN »0 

LOiOiOt>- CO O CO OC N <-( iO t» CO 00 

OOOOOOS t» © b. m «# CN OS CNCS^-i 

CO CN CN CN <N CO CO CO CO »* CO CO CN CO 

OOCOCOlO coooos^os^oo Nmo 

»-< CNJ O rH rr CD t» iO «o lO CO t» O CO 

CN CM i— I C* »-• i— 1 1-( i— I i-* i— I i— I i-(M— I 

CN00C5O O CN lO OS 00 CO t- KJOOS 

*-i OS © 00 CO CO *«* © iO 00 CN CO © CN 

CN-HCN^H CM CN CN CM CN CN CO CN CN CN 

»-iCO^O0 OS rt< «* CO CO OS CN CN CO <-H 

NOmn ,-h M qm _h CO i-i CO CO^CN 

CNCNCMCM CN CN CM CN CN CN CM CN CN CN 

CNfHTfCO CO CN CO <-" »-« lO CO CNCNCO 

© © t» OS »-i CO CN CN >C 00 CO »-> OS CN 

COCOCNCN CO CO CO CO CO CN CO CO CN CO 

UOCOCOCD iO »-i CO >0 **<»#< •# "Ot>-CN 

CNt>»C<IO0 OhNNOCON CSt>-0 

K5 CO iC UO CO CO iO "0 iC CO CO iC»OiO 

NCOOSOS COOONtOiHON SfO 

cocot^r*. oooci-'ceo oocoo 

CNCNCNCN CNCOCNCo'cOCNCO CNCNCO 
T3 

a> as 

p 

^rt 

ok 

"8 £ all 

• • • is - B -53 ' *ll 

0_ ->i J '-' ;— .t. h-i MMU) 

** o S9 ^fl n >«<s d l* u h. 

"i fl S >i3'2 S « O a S ojcpoi 

'C'SS °X> O 2 oo O CU to^, ^^^ 



78 P. D. 48 

Table No. 2. — Rainfall in inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1926 



Date 



Jan. 4 
Jan. 5 
Jan. 9 
Jan. 18 
Jan. 19 
Jan. 21 
Jan. 22 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 27 
Jan. 28 
Jan. 31 
Feb. 1 

Total 



1 
2 

4 
6 

7 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 10 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 14 
Feb. 15 
Feb. 18 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 22 
Feb. 25 
Feb. 26 

Total 



March 2 
March 7 
March 8 
March 15 
March 20 
March 20 
March 23 
March 25 
March 26 
March 27 
March 31 
April 1 

Total 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 22 
April 23 
April 25 
April 28 
April 29 

Total 



May 
May 
May 
May 
May 10 
May 11 
May 15 
May 17 
May 19 
May 20 
May 23 
May 27 
May 31 

Total 



Amount 



.24 

.551 
.79 

.702 

.04» 

.041 
.442 



2.80 



.42 

2.201 
.151 

1.03» 

1.192 

.44 

.17 
.03 
.71 



6.34 



.41 
.762 

.031 

.08 

.332 

.04 

.15 

.292 

.76 



2.85 



.03 
.34 

.832 

.03 
.03 
.76 

.17 



2.19 



.05 

.09 
.02 

.15 

1.98 

.09 

.34 
.03 
.08 



2.83 



Duration 



9.30 a.m. to 

9.00 p.m. 
5.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. 
6.00 a.m. to 

5.00 A.M. 
3.00 p.m. to 

10.00 A.M. 

1.30 p.m. to 

3.30 a.m. 
9.45 a.m. to 10.30 a.m. 
1.30 p.m. to 

7.00 A.M. 



8.30 a.m. to 

4.00 A.M. 

1.30 a.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
8.00 p.m. to 

1.15 A.M. 

1.45 a.m. to 

2.30 a.m. 
3.15 a.m. to 

6.00 A.M. 

9.45 p.m. to 

7.00 A.M. 

3.00 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 
12.15 a.m. to 6.00 A.M. 
12.45 p.m. to 

12.30 a.m. 



1.20 a.m. 
5.30 a.m. 

9.00 p.m. 
2.10 A.M. 
2.45 p.m. 
3.00 p.m. 
6.25 a.m. 
11.45 A.M. 

11.15 A.M. 



to 12.15 p.m. 

to 

9.00 A.M. 

9.50 p.m. 

5.10 A.M. 

9.00 p.m. 
6.00 p.m. 
to 12.30 A.M. 

to 

1.30 A.M. 

to 

4.30 a.m. 



to 
to 
to 
to 



7.30 a.m. 
6.00 p.m. 



to 1.00 P.M. 

to 

4.30 a.m. 



5.30 a.m. to 



4.50 a.m. 
12.50 a.m. 
12.45 a.m. 

9.15 A.M. 



3.30 a.m. 
5.30 a.m. 
3.30 a.m. 

to 4.00 A.M. 

to 

12.45 a.m. 



to 
to 



8.40 p.m. to 



12.45 a.m. 
2.00 p.m. 

1.45 p.m. 
2.05 p.m. 



to 
to 

to 
to 



12 
4 

3 
9 



15 A.M. 
00 A.M. 

30 A.M. 
00 P.M. 



10.00 p.m. to 



2.00 p.m. 



5.45 a.m 

11.15 A.M 

12.15 p.m. 



5 
to 12 
to 12 
to 12. 



.30 A.M. 
.00 M. 
00 M. 
00 M. 



Date 



June 1 
June 2 
June 7 
June 8 
June 15 
June 16 
June 18 
June 23 
June 26 
June 27 

Total 



July 6 
July 14 
July 15 
July 16 
July 18 
July 22 
July 24 
July 29 
July 30 

Total 



August 2 
August 3 
August 7 
August 8 
August 11 
August 12 
August 13 
August 14 
August 14 
August 16 
August 17 
August 24 
August 25 
August 26 

Total 



Sept. 2 
Sept. 5 
Sept. 6 
Sept. 13 
Sept. 17 
Sept. 23 
Sept. 24 
Sept. 25 
Sept. 26 
Sept. 28 

Total 



Oct. 6 
Oct. 13 
Oct. 17 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 20 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 24 
Oct. 25 
Oct. 31 

Total 



Nov. 2 
Nov. 5 
Nov. 9 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 14 
Nov. 16 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 19 
Nov. 26 
Nov. 27 
Nov. 30 

Total 



Amount 



.13 

.32 
.07 

.42 

.03 
.05 
.55 



1.57 



.03 
.22 
.68 

.19 
1.47 

1.62 



4.21 



.20 

.09 

1.36 

.11 

.48 

.09 

.05 

1.34 

.05 
.03 



3.80 



.01 
.16 
.09 
.02 
.05 
.51 

.31 

.01 



1.16 



.22 
.51 
.13 
.03 
.85 

1.62 

.41 



3.77 



.08 

.02 

1.26 

.02 

.27 
1.79 

.57 

.50 



4.51 



Duration 



8.20 p.m. to 



4.00 A.M. 
6.00 p.m. 
4.30 p.m. 

5.45 a.m. 
6.15 p.m. 
2.45 p.m. 



to 
to 
to 

to 
to 
to 



1.30 
4.00 
6.30 

1.30 
2.30 
9.50 



M. 
M. 
M. 

M. 

M. 



P.M. 



12.30 A.M. 



9.30 a.m. to Midnight 
3.45 a.m. to 9.30 a.m. 
8.45 p.m. to 

12.30 p.m. 
6.00 p.m. to 10.45 p.m. 
10.50 p.m. to 

2.00 p.m. 
10.30 a.m. to 

8.30 a.m. 



12 noon to 
5.20 p.m. to 
3.40 p.m. to 

10.15 A.M. tO 

4.40 p.m. to 

2.45 a.m. to 

12.15 p.m. to 

3.45 p.m. to 

11.00 a.m. to 

11.15 P.M. to 



1.10 P.M. 

8.15 p.m. 

1.00 a.m. 
11.25 a.m. 

7.30 a.m. 

3.05 a.m. 

10.00 p.m. 

2.30 a.m. 
6.45 p.m. 

10.30 a.m . 



9.30 a.m. 
4.40 a.m. 
6.00 a.m. 
12.30 a.m. 
2.20 a.m. 



to 
to 
to 
to 
to 



9.15 p.m. to 
11.00 p.m. to 

3.00 A.M. to 



11.45 A.M. 

6.00 p.m. 

7.00 p.m. 

5.30 a.m. 

12.45 p.m. 

12 noon 

7.00 A.M. 
4.00 A.M. 



11.00 A.M. 

7.00 p.m. 
10.00 A.M. 

4.00 A.M. 
12.20 p.m. 

10.20 a.m. 

1.00 P.M. 



to 
to 
to 
to 
to 

to 

to 



12.45 

11.00 

5.45 

6.30 



P.M. 
P.M. 
P.M. 
A.M. 



10.45 a.m. 



1.45 
10.45 



P.M. 
P.M. 



12.50 p.m. to 
9.00 a.m. to 

2.00 A.M. to 

7.00 p.m. to 
5.10 p.m. to 
7.30 p.m. to 

2.50 p.m. to 

4.30 a.m. to 



4.00 p.m. 
4.00 p.m. 

5.15 A.M. 
11.00 P.M. 
11.45 p.m. 

7.30 a.m. 

3.30 a.m. 
9.30 p.m. 



1 Snow. 



Total for year, 39.82 inches. 

2 Rain and Snow. 



P. D. 48 79 

Table No. 2 — Rainfall in inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1926 — Continued 



Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Dec. 3 


.131 


8.30 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. 








Dec. 5 


J 1.02i 


9.00 a.m. to 








Dec. 6 


7.15 A.M. 








Dec. 10 


.201 


5.45 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 








Dec. 14 


.02 


4.45 a.m. to 7.00 a.m. 








Dec. 15 


.101 


3.00 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 








Dec. 20 


.031 


7.00 a.m. to 11.45 A.M 








Dec. 24 


.14 


4.35 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 








Dec. 26 


.66i 


4.30 a.m. to 3.40 p.m. 








Dec. 28 


\ 1.421 


8.00 a.m. to 








Dec. 29 


J 


1.30 A.M. 








Dec. 31 


.07 


9.00 p.m. to 








Jan. 1 


/ 


3.00 A.M. 








Total 


3.79 













Total for year 39.82 inches, 
i Snow. * Rain and Snow. 



80 



Ob 



a* 

§ 

1 

■to 

^ "co" 

*"• J& 

I S 

3 
cr 

— oo 

§ °° 

rS oo 

fe, 2 



S 

03 
"O 

> 

o 

Xi 
(S 

"O 

II 
(* 

■»a 
(8 






00 



^ 



<to 






i 

c 



Cm 



•2 o! , "O 

Ot2— oj 

„ c o -^> 

Ov •-< FN CJ 

*tf - 



Q 

« 

H 

ft. 

<& 

o 
J 

J 
«! 

O 



' S ^ « 

'cs — a 

*6~ 






OJ OJ -•- 



I* 33 

O -r; ,o5 j3 



o 

•< 

K 
O 
H 
02 



oo 
O 



• — 

c8 

a 



oj jqtfi 
M be b *2, 

rt 3 ° S 



o 

o 



E 

feQ 

ooPh O 



Oj 



a ^ 



"O ^>-^ oj 
oj."S <n_ri 



K ^ OJ 

OJ >! S 



«H o a 



o 



Tt"CO»O©C0-*f , »Oi.O-<J<-«*<ce»"» 

;ocn'-icci^co'-|'-'CN*hcncn 



CN 



cccoco--i'i<0'*<'«t | eoccii0i-i 

HHW^HQOOOOrtH 






noncnoNO 

> ©©© Th ©00 0} 



CN"0CN(NCNCNCNeN--<.**iiOM< 



OOQOOOOOOOOO 

OOQOOCOOOCOO 

ooooooooo_coo 

i— l^t>-©LOlO00"cNr-"t>-©i— I 
lOCOCOHNO'O'-OOOOMO 
©CCC0"*00^*<CNeNCNC0COcO 
rH(N 



800O00O00000 
©OOOQOOOO©© 

© © © o © o © © © © © © 

NCOCOCN*'00*©©"cOiOt>"cO 

TJH TjH T^Ol J>©>^-* OOl-HCO© 

CO O* *ft CN © tJ* 00 t> rH CN* US © 
©©O©00-<J<CNCNCN-<*©r^ 
•H CNCN 



© 
© 
© 

CO 
CO 

00 



I I I 



©©©©©©< 
©©o©oo< 
©©_©©©©< 

0CO"iO©-*t^( 
|©<N CO©©00( 

iq<N"0cq©ioi 

CO CN GO 'O tO IN pj CO 

'-••'^©CN© 



©oo 
oo© 
o©© 

CN00-* 

^r>Tco 

<Nrt<O0 



I I I I I I ! I 



>©©0©©©0©©0< 

'QOOQogogor 



I©©©©©©©, 1 

CO iO CO •«* ©©* CN ©*©"©" © © 
?Dl>©b-©©CO©iCO©© 
cC«OCOt»GOt-t*tO©«Di£>tO 



8888! 



800000 
© © o © o _ 

©00©©©©0©©00 

t» CN © © OS t* © 00* •* US CO r* 

©COCO'-i'-i©CNC>CO"*CO00 



o©oo 

OQOO 

©oo© 

HHIOO 

CN00_CNO3 
©"COIOCD 



8©ooo©©© 
ooooooo 
©_ © © o_ © © © © 
n* co oj ©* us ©* t>" ■<* 

©t^rttCOCrHt^^- 
t>-rt<00rHO500CNO5 

©" CO* CO* ©* ■* SO r* lO 

©iCJ>CO-*CN©© 



I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I I I I I I 



oo 
oo 

OO 

o"t-* 

©00 
rJ*CO 



888 

©_©o 

©*co©* ' 

Ort<co 

CN 



©©©oo©© 

©QOOOOO 

qqqqSqq 

© co" ©* © t>" CO CO 

•<*< lC rH O 00 © Tt< 

COCOCOO©iOCN 



CO 
US 
CO I 



CO 

© I 

CO 



>> 

(i S3 



OJ 



oj 5 






9 s s a 

3 ojX 



0) oj 






© 
o 
o 

©* 

CN 

CO 



8 

© 

00 



8 

CN 

"J* 

CO 
CN 



I I 



i5 



© 
o 
© 

CO 

© 

CO 



I I 



CO 

y— I 
CO 



P. D. 48 



1 



X 



1 1 



►2W<5 



>i 

u 

— o 

0J^ 






P. D. 48 



as 



•I 

"53 

I 
| 

5 

HO 

0> 

*&■ 1 

*• i 

CO E 

J II 

*** it 

°2 | 

In 



i 



-*-* **h •— J CD 
fl o w *^ 

£ TS ° 

O 4> a <D 

f*H Wq 






•° 2 

S3 3 



NOO'OHClOOiOOi'MN 

rH^-OOCOrHOOt^-^iOCOOS 
1ONO1OOH | rl CNCN 



CSCOCOCOtHOSCNiOCOOOcOiO 
COOSCOCNOOI>CNrHCSOOOOS 
u0iOO0COCNrHi-tT*rHCNCOr- ' 

hh^MhQOOOOhh 



OCNC0-<C5O00rHOt^t^C0 
OOSCNCNCNCOrHiO-<*r^CNO 

OOiOOOCNCNrHOOiOrHOOiO-* 



Q 

« 
w 

Pk 
EG 

o 

J 

■« 

o 



hi 

ft M CD 

_ ».*3 
a; o"^ 



oooooooooooo 

oooooooooooo 
o_ o_ o. o o. o. o_ o o_ o. o_ o. 

oo h(ono" Tf'odoo co ■* oo"o" 

(OOJN^NO^O(<3'-*HON 



CN< 



I 



H-c CD 



oooooooooooo 

oooooooooooo 
o_ o. o. o. o o. o o. o. o. o o 

o* *■" •<* •"** cn" o* o* o" >o" c* o* »-7 
OCNoocNcorHCNOsrHooit^oo 

O^OO.rH00rHTH_iqiqC0.C0 
Tf" t}" tJh' tj" "3* I> iO t>" 00 00 O* O* 

cot>-OTfi»c i i-i i co^o 





« 
o 

02 



o £ 
«•— <u co d 



oooooooooooo 
oooooooooooo 
o. o o_ o o. o. o o o o o o. 

CO rH oo" lO t> ©* »o OO rH CO* t> cn* 

O^OC0OCNC0Tj<OOt»»0 
^O.00.00O.rHCOiq»qt>.rHcN 

i— I lO l^* CN* OS 00 r- liHrt(OiO>H 
■<*< t- i-l 00 00 rH coco 



.i S"** °* 

ITj Q CD M 

«"*~ £ P* d 



OOOOOOOOOOOO 

oooooooooooo 
oooo_ooooooo_o 

t> 00" CN O* rH t^T t>T rH O OS <© CO" 

OHijtNMOMNHHNM 

o. o_ in ■* rH co •* t>. co >o a o_ 

iHiHNNiH rH 



(a 

I CD 



C3T) gl 



3 fe o3 



oooooooooooo 
oooooooooooo 
o_ o_ o o o_ o o_ o_ o o_ o o_ 

CO CN ■* tO O* O* oo" ■* "5 1>^ O* C35 

OOOOSOOiCNlNOOCOaiOOrH 
r^t»CO-^CNeO0OrHcNrHrH0O 



IH S-fi « 2 
^^3 P £ 2 







B sr| 



OOOOOOOOOC 

OOOOOOOOOC 

oo_oooo_o_oo_o< _ 

O >0 ■* CN rH 00 C35 kfl C3S rH o* o 

ooooooooocoicr^cooas 

rH O, O CN CS rH OS ■* p_ -r^ ■* 00 

os" »o oo" oo" oo" co* o" cn" •*" o" oo* *a 

lOrHCNrHtNOOOOCNOOOOCNOO 



■S.S 



~ IH 

«i: 2 S3 

B "SPh 



ooo 

ooo 
ooo. 

iCOO'tN 

ceo* 
qiqq 

c*ooic" 

rH CO O 



OQOOO 

COOOO 

o.o.o.o.o. 

(-"cCO't^-rj" 

c> i— * oo a> 
cqicoi.iqoq 

co"o"oo"oo"o" 



oooo 
o o o o 
o.qo.o 

cdrHood 

CO l^ us uo 

«q>flo t> 

TfCOrHlO 

■^CNOiO 



I 1 *,-- • • • -^sigg 



00 

00 



lO 

CO 

CO 






o 

CO* 



o 
o 
o. 

00* 

oo 
o. 

CO 
lO 





o o oo 






o o oo 




VI 


o o oo 




O 

h" 


|t>»i 1 »0 1 1 1 1 i0Ot« 


1 1 


1 lO ' ' Ifl ' ■ ' ' ' HQ0 




t^ CO iOr* 






b» 00 CO 






CO rH r^ i—< 






o oo ooooo 






o oo ooooo 


o 


a 


o oo ooooo 


o 


. rH 

O 


00 1 rHt> I 0000*0 1 I 


, °. 


iO ' cooo ' t^ocot^co ' ' 


1 OO 


O ICOO COCOOOOrH 


"* 




O COOS OOOtNCN 


l>» 




l-H rH rH rH 00 rH 





o 
o 
o 

00* 
OS 
00. 

r>* 

CO 



o 
o 
o. 

oo* 
t~ 

o 



o 
o 
o. 

CN* 

00 
CO 



o 
o 
o. 

a* 
a 
oo. 

OS 



00 
00 



CO 



■* 
"* 



03 

S 

< 



O 

> 

!-. 

V 
OS 

« 

& 

3 
02 

O 

a 

O) 

03 

o 
as 



O 

a 

CD 
u 
(U 

6" 
-a 

« 
pe 



a 

03 
O 

w 

as 
•+* 

Oj 

GQ 

^a 

M 

3 
O 

u 
O 

*j 
ao 
cu 



0) 

-a 



ft 
a 

3 

90 

CU 

A 



u 

O 



o 
3 
T3 
a> 

3 

< 



CO 

3 

CJ 

0] 
tt 

aj 

a 

o 

hi 
«r« 

a 
pe 

03 

•s 



-3 

55 



oS 



CN 

CN 

3 

t3 
^3 

"3 

a 



o 

2; 



81 



82 



P. D. 48 



Ob 



•S 



•I 

§ 

©> 

I 

««o 

*- a 



fe 



ID 

s- 
03 

3 

to 






OD 


0> 


t) 


J4 


•r* 


rt 


■*J 




to 

■»o 


O 




13 

4> 


ZQ 


J3 


1 


00 




t- 


1 


0> 


s 


e8 


to 


£ 


co 




Si 




CQ 




05 




to 




© 




3 




to 




•«o 




rfS 




«J 




© 




o 





o 

a 



Q) M g 



o 

«- 

fin 






"3 to 
« o> 

.2 o 

« a 



«< 
Q 

05 
W 

c 

o 

►J 

J 

■«! 

o 



2*3.2 

£ a f s 



2 "O 

OJ 0) 



H 
O 
< 

o 

H 
02 



to 
oo 
O 



g 

"3 

a 



o> o> ■*» "3 

-*> *= 3 t? 

03 



i Bt3 oo 

^3 Sj o> 

533** 




6 

o 



M'^OOtOCOOOOOJ^'-iO'* 

Tt<Tt<COl-ll-OCNCO^H , 1-4 CO CO 

»-< I— I 



I CO 



T*COt^e>li-icOcN<Ni-'->}<a>CO CO 
>OiOI>.GO , «J<CO'-HC/jO-*COCO »0 

HN*«rtOOOOOHH 



r-lTfi-HC0G0©tNC5<N^O'0 

i-icoiocoiDid-«*iococ5iooo 
coiDcocMCNi-tco^i-icOTrico 



■* 



o 



OQOOOOOOOOOO 

800000CC0CC0 
^©oocooocooo 

i-h i-" h t> © O N* <N CO *& CD co 
CDOt-COCi'-'COcO I rt< © CO 
XiOCCOI>CN ■'j' CNuCt^ 

i-*C<fi-H 



oooooooooooo o 

coooooooooco o 

oooooooooooo ©_ 

COCCiOt-OOOOOOi— IO CJ CO i— i «"H 

r-l CSOt^CCcDCC H | CM r-< •«* b» 

id b^ CO CO CO CO i-" 00 -<tf"-*co •* 

i-h CN tP CN i— I i— t i-h i-H 



OO 

oo 
oo 

CNCN 

i—i cO 
CO 



o oo 
o oo 
o oo 



I I I I I 



co 

© 
CO 



«1H 

CO 00 
COCN 



I I 



I I 



oooooo 
oooooo 

000,000 
Tj"cdi-"ocNco 

CD Tfi 00 O CO r-t 
Tt< ^ CD i-H t>. iC 

l> 'J* r-T CO 



o 
o 
© 

00 

tD 



I I 



o 

CD 



oooooo 

© © © Q © 5 

oooooo 
rf id >d >d cnT tjT 

X' 1> CD iO >-0 C7J 

inqONNq 

^ldoC(N(N»-H 

ft •* N CM iH 



ooo 
ooc 
oo_o 

1>40C75 
(NOC35 

CO CN-^CO 



o 
o 
o 

CO 
CD 



o 
o 
o 

o* 

id 
CO 

CO* 



oooooooooooo 

oooooooooooo o 

ooo_q.ooo_o_oo_oo_ q 

edi^c"o*^cdo"»dcd'cNO"Tj" ■ »d 

O CO (N CD iO O <-i CO CO CO rri OS «0 

t>- CD -f iO OS ID "* CO CO CO I> CO t^ 



CO 

-o 
a 
o 
a 

cX 

p 

a 
>. 
"3 
Q 



DO 

o> 

co 

o> 
■J 
c3 

& 

0) 

a 
'-3 



o 

J5 



I I I I I I I I i I I I 



I I 




P. D. 48 83 

Table No. 6. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 

drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct 



Month 



January . 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



Number of 
Days during 

which 

Water was 

Flowing 



25 
17 
22 
25 
25 
26 
26 
26 
25 
25 
25 
26 



293 



Actual Time 



Hours 



298 
183 
218 
253 
247 
340 
386 
314 
299 
284 
253 
282 



Minutes 



30 
15 
11 


30 
25 
45 
38 
38 


10 
15 



140.05 days 



Million 
Gallons 
Drawn 



3,695.7 
1,786.8 
1,712.8 
2,304.0 
2,814.6 
4,604.2 
5,389.1 
4,034.3 
4,353.2 
3,931.1 
2,738.3 
3,285.2 



40,649.3 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir 



Month 



January . 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



Number of 
Days during 

which 

Water was 

Flowing 



26 
26 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 



358 



Actual Time 



Hours 



438 
487 
744 
708 
736 
715 
744 
739 
687 
012 
675 
655 



Minutes 



00 
25 
00 
30 
00 
52 
00 
20 
00 
30 
45 
30 



331 days 



Million 
Gallons 
Drawn 



2,199.8 
2,324.7 
3,073.4 
2,892.9 
3,026.5 
2,855.1 
3,018.9 
3,110.1 
2,878.6 
2,915.4 
3,022.2 
3,137.9 



34,455.5 



From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut 

Hill Reservoir 



Month 



January . 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 

Totals 



Number of 
Days during 

which 

Water was 

Flowing 



31 
28 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 



365 



Actual Time 
(Hours) 



744 
672 
744 
719 
744 
720 
744 
744 
721 
744 
720 
742 



8,758 



Million 
Gallons 
Drawn 



1,832.1 

1,262.4 
731.1 
545.3 
743.4 

1,084.9 
959 . 1 
696.1 

1,023.8 
944.9 
702.0 
412.6 



11,637.7 



84 



Table No. 7. 



P. D. 48 

Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 
1926 by Months 1 



Month 



January . 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . 

September 

October . 

November 

December 

Average 



Wachusett 

Aqueduct 

into 

Sudbury 
Reservoir 

(Gallons) 



119,035,000 

63,593,000 

55,042,000 

76,697.000 

90,578,000 

153,240,000 

173,587,000 

129,894,000 

144,666,000 

126,571,000 

91,050,000 

105,758,000 



111,144,000 



Weston 

Aqueduct 

into 

Metropolitan 

District 

(Gallons) 



70,961,000 

83,025,000 

99,142,000 

96,564,000 

97,629,000 

95,170,000 

97,384,000 

100,326,000 

95,820,000 

94,045,000 

100,740.000 

101,223,000 



94,399,000 



Sudbury 

Aqueduct 

into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons) 



59,100,000 
45,085,000 
23,584,000 
18,202,000 
23,981,000 
36,163,000 
30,939,000 
22,455,000 
34,079,000 
30,481,000 
23,400,000 
35,890,000 



31,884,000 



Cochituate 

Aqueduct 

into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons) 



1 Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



P. D. 48 



85 



*-S 

eo 
eo 

60 
.*» 

Ctf 



eo 

if 
c 

CO 



<0 
Ob 



is <*> 
■3-4* 

CO 

Or° 
8 o 

I 



•8 

a 
Ml 



-I 

I 

00 

O 



X 

z o 
« « a 



« « 



a 






n 

z o 

i S3 ^ 

5 h a 

00 w 



a 

a a 

H02 



B 

° 5: 

02 



m d * !* 
d o-g 03 
0-J3 



CM-Hb.COT)<t>.rH00Oi00^CM 

O00>©0)000!0:0)0)0 



4>.2 
tf-" 3 

§"3 

in o 



^T3 

o +* S* 

H 5£ 



oooo 
oooo 

"*'iOCOrH 

cocmcooo 
o_o>_o_o_ 

rJ*CMO0*CO* 
CO CO CM CM 



oooo 
oooo 

0,-*0,05 
Tj"cd<N*ai* 

CllOt^rH 

COO_(NOO_ 

■rj*a*co"o" 
CM CM CO CM 



oo 
oo 

00 CM 

<n"o* 

rH 00 

CM-* 

(NO 

M00 



OO 
OO 

oseo 
OrH 

t-_(N 

COCO 
<NC0 



c 


i 




fl 


, 







u 


o 





03 




+J 


U 






+j 


m a 


GO 


HUM 


c 


r; 




U 


n 







"B 


T3 
C 





T 


"0 

d 


s 


a 




<< 


rt 





fi d fl 
o c-d o 

,2 « S 




OOOOQOOOOOOO 

oooooooooooo 
o^oomgocoo^co^coio-*-* 

rH^*CO*CO"aO*od<N*o"»0"*0*(N"ai 
-rf0i00CMC0-*»OO-HHC0CMt>. 
CO M ■* •<* Oi t>» CO «D CD OO iO t~ 

doddoHNHHo'do" 



H 


*a 


« > 


W « 


« a 


6*02 


^ 


oo a 


w 



>>" d _P3 d d 

O oj oj 5 . 03 O 

0"2 5 b-S 2^ 



l s a|s 



Soo 
oo 

icodo" 

1-HTjtCO 

cqo_«q 

•<* icco" 
^ ^ ^ 



ooo 

ooo 

O5 00Oi 

coco'od 

INOlOl 
Tfi CJ »-< 

(N(N-* 

^ ^ ^ 



oooooo 
oooooo 
O_co_eot>^co»fl 

MM O* CO* 00*00* 
rH tJH CO Ol 00 CO 
»C(N>-HCO_-<*(N 

lO iO CO* »0 tJ* CO 

^^^ ^p ^^* ^5^ ^^^ ^5^ 



I 

■sSl 

Sal 
o oCQ 
■a +» 



m d - 



- 5 -a§ 



^Jc£ 



I oi d a q} 

. C3 tl &■< 

e«5 5 2 

! -^> o 






O 



H 
O 

s 



t- . t~ . 

o3 d-g_ § §^° § s 



00 



OOOOOOOOOOOO o 

-* 00 (N CO O -# 00 CN CO O ■* 00 00 

00W0»'*O,'0p - C0_»-it^CNI> o_ 

cd ooo*'-* co"'* cotter" o*(N* co* co 

^H r-t rH tN <N (N (N IN (N CO CO CO CN 

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 00 CO 



o 
o 

o 

(N 

o" 

CO 



oooooooooooo o 

oooooooooooo o 

CN t>._ t> <N <-H 00_ O 00_ t> CO_ (N •* 

l> 00 J> CO COrH rH rHtC 0*00*00* Oi 

t> •* CO Oi 00 rH i-i O ■* CM l> T« l> 

OOOOCM iO t» CO lO CO (N rH CM 



oooooooooooo o 

oooooooooooo o 
i-H o ooico co TjNcoq © o_ 

o*HMo"ido"c*idco(do"H io 

00 •* <N t» rH -HH 00 Oi CO O Oi t> O 

CM rH O Oi "-I 00 »C rH <N CM rH rH CM 



o 
o 

<N 

rH 

CO 

o 



o 
o 

Oi 

00 
00 
CO 



OOOOOOOOOOOO o 

OOOOOOOOOOOO o 

lOCM rHG0t»O' H _'Ocqt^t^O CM 

t^ocdiocdodci'odo'rHCM t^T ^c 

CO 00 CM CO O -* rH t>. OS CM CM t- (4 

'* c l 00 .'^. Tt l* s l 00 .' ,1 l' r *i T, l c i 010 . oi 
0'0'-<'coodo"r-*0'-^»-*rHcb" 

t>.t>.t>.cOcOt>-t^t't>»t't^b- 



86 



P. D. 48 



8 

c 









99 


"S'ONCNOiONfCCHM' 


c 








Ph 99 


iOi0'O»O»OCOt0;C<0C0C0c0 


* 


55 
U 

P. 

►J 


O 


03 
55 


o 






Tt< 


O 








CO 

CN 


•< 

o 


>. 


CCCQOCCCOCQ© 

ocoooccocoo© 


8 


^5 


»C 


Q 


OOCOO-'-JOO^'CNCOCNOO'-h^ 

© cn ^ r-i ■*£ r-T t>T ei »d cd cd oc 


00 

O* 








tm 


oooo^iocncn'TcooO'-hi* 


CO 








Ph 


KOOOSOiffi'H^NCONNeO 


<— 1 








cNCNCNtNeNcococococococo 


CO 



55 
C 
H 
O 
55 

W 



o 
© 

00 



55 

o 

■< 

o 



H 
H 

W 

« 
w 



8 



8 

co 
8 






co 

e 

$-. 



OS 

o 

-I 

m 






u 

0Q 

- 

o 



55 
o 

H 

tB 
O 

PQ 



H 

55 
O 
S 

w 



55 

o 

H 

o 
g 

*H 



c 

(S 

o 







o 



a 
_o 
"■♦3 

re 

a 

o 
Ph 



>-.r 

Ph re 

o 



C3fOlftNC0C5OW"5P5t* 
O iO lO l". ON X «N (C ©O 



re 

Q 

h 

Ph 



COOCC'OOQQOOO 
OCCOOCOOOOOO 
^oqcNcDiqoo-"*t>.oqr~»oo 

NCONinOiONNNCOOCO 

M'cococoooO'-hi-OOcN'-ho 





DQ 


o 


55 


th 


C 


t« 


_) 


CN 

i 


Gal 



Ph 93 



NCOOOCOOCCXtCSMON 
COCNi-h.-ii-h.-4i-h,-<CNCNCNCO 



re 

Q 

v 
Ph 



OOOOOOOCQOOO 
OOCOOOOCCCOC 
CNCOOCO^T^CCiO©'<t©cq 

idodcNcdoocdcdcd'Hidodcd 

O'-H00C0-HOCN'<t<G0CNt>»0 

^cNo^ooo_05co-«t'*H_co_ 





to 




55 


o 

ITS 


O 
_1 


O 


J 


N 


< 


1 






<-.o 

a) a 

Ph re 



U 



(D^iOONO^WCOHN© 



re 

Q 

|H 

Ph 



OOC'COOOOOOOO 
OOCOOOOCOOO© 
^OOcq^C5C5^COTj<©-<*00 

CO'-Hi©iO-HX*05odcO«0'HO 
COiOOOiOOOCNOOOOOiOCO 
^^iCCOrHCOiCr^TH_CO-*CO 

cdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcd 



o 

O 


55 


iO 


O 




iJ 


O 


J 


00 


< 


i 


O 



t-.O 

pH 33 



CM-HiOO'-i«NiOiOCOiO«*CN 



re 
Q 

>- 
o 
Ph 



OOCOOOCOOOOO 
OCOOCOOOOCOO 
0©_^0-*©CNCOCO^t^CO 

i-H©*Ncdc©cdoN»Hoced'<iJ' 

ennoNOOMioooiN 

c0**0000CNCCr>^N»O'*©'* 

io io d to n cc d d h h d © 

00500000000505005050 



1 


32 


O 


55 


00 


o 


O 


►J 


CD 


J 


1-H 


< 




o 



re 

a> o, 

Ph re 

O 



©©©©NCCNO©iOiOO 



re 

Q 

u 
C) 

Ph 



OOOOCOOOCOOO 
OOOOOOOOOCOO 
TfkO»O'-t;l>-'-Hrt<i-HCOrfi00iO 

OMNOSONOONO©'* 
OOOCCNCCCMOOOOOOOO 





W 


O 


55 


o. 


O 


c 


►J 






■ 


a 



« a 

Ph re 
O 



'*<co-HC<ii^o'oy5ooot--co 



re 
Q 



» 
H 
55 
O 



coccooopoooo 
ooooocoooooo 

N ■* 00 CNHO iO *# iO CN 00 • _ i' - i 

ic^ocfNodididocNcNroo 

COCOCOCO'#oq05'*l>iqrfTj< 

§ g-s_ "g S-s I § 



CC 



o 
cd 

i-H 



CO 
CN 



o 
o 

OS 

«c 

CN 

»d 



CN 



o 
o 

CO 



CO 



o 
o 

id 

CN 

I-H 

o 



CO 
CO 



o 
o 

o 

CO 

© 



o 



o 
o 

CN 

o" 

CN 



I- 

<s 
o 

-— 

o 



P. D. 48 



87 



T3 

.s 

H»3 

a 
o 

O 






•I 



CO 

o 






Oi 

6 

3 

m 
H 



e 

W 
> 


o 

CO 


Gallons 


Per 
Capita 




09 

O 


>> 

03 

Q 

O 


©oooooooooop 
oooooooooooo 

C5 CSCOr^ «C 00 OJ0COSCCOJ -h" 

tDCHO-HSiOtOiONNO 

iHHrHOC^C*3(ClOH/HON 

CM* CM CM* IN* of CM CM* CM of IN IN CM* 


o 
o 

00 

CO* 
CD 
CM 

CM 


P 


o 

I© 

N 

CO 

1 

1 


as 
Z 
O 
►J 
■J 
< 

a 


03 

H.-2 

Ph £ 
O 


COCOCOCOt>00<-Ht>.00COi*<lQ 


CO 


as 

Q 

Ph 


ooooooooooco 
cooooooooooo 
eot^ic^oocs'-^tq'^t^oo'* 

od^osoci'oos'^io^Nco 

CCCOO'>tf"OCDl"»»-0'-H©'«*<CO 
•* <© t~» iO t-» 00 O 00 OS l> CO t> 

^7^ ^T^ """P ^T "'"i"' """P "■-J "*"?^ **"P "^P ^"P "*"r 


o 

o 
o 

t>* 
>o 
t>^ 

■^* 


< 

K 


O 

1—4 


o 
5 

•< 
O 


03 

(-.■2 

Oh n 
U 


OOiOCD'^LOCOOOOiOCO'^OS 
iOiOiOiO0iCOCM00iOC5CO«O 
i-H CM r-{ r-t 


o 

1— ( 


>> 

o3 

Q 

|H 

a> 
Oh 


OOOOOOOOOOCO 

oooooooooooo 

05 05C0 05'-iOO'* *ONV 
t>* rH CM OS 00 CM t^* Tj* O* •"* t>T <X* 

C5a>csooict^Ot-no<o©'-H 

HNMMCJHHrt 


CM 

oc 

i-H 


o 

1 


O 

<N 

CO 

t-H 


10 
O 

►J 
>< 

a 


Ph a 
O 


t^t^OOCRCO^Oit^COTtHCOO 


CM 


>> 

03 

Q 

h 
a> 

Ph 


oooooooooooo 

ooooooocoooo 

T^OC/DroCM«*CMrHt^C5CMO 

"* CM CD C* CM »-* «-* C* © <C t>" rj* 

(NCMCOiCiOiOOCMtNCMr-oO 
«D<OCDCOI>-001>COt~t>»t^«O 


o 
o 

CD 

>-H 
O 


w 



« 

w 


o 

^H 

o* 

IN 


to 

o 

< 


03 
Ph 03 

U 


o»Hc^coiO'-'OiocMr*t^»-H 

COOCO©(ONN<CN(DffiN 


CO 


>> 

03 

Q 

It 

Ph 


oooooooooooo 
oooooooooooo 

OsOCO'-i'HTjfoOCOCDCM-H^ 

OCOT^Oi-H--HTlH'rHTjTcOodcO 
C0C0N-iCt?t^O'*0005t^t>- 
CMCMCMCOCO^OCO^COCOrJH 


o 
o 

CO 

oT 

CO 

I-H 


« 
O 

Q 


O 

CO 

C* 


O 
3 

«< 
O 


03 
Ph ei 

o 


CON.(N00O5^H^O5CO(N(MCO 
tOH/O^^iOiCjTfiiOirjiCliO 


1-H 

tti 


>> 

03 
P 

>- 
<u 
Ph 


oooooooooooo 
oooooooooooo 

r^cOr^iqcO^Ct-^CO'HeoO 

eoeftt-^eMCNfcoco'cocNfoso 
t>.«-ieMio«-H»-HCicooi>cs** 

LOCOiOCO , T l '00'*OiOiO^D 
CM* CM CM IN CM CM IN CM CM* CM CM CM* 


o 
o 
"*. 

CM* 
CM 

ta 

CM* 


a 
St 
o 

4* 
h 
O 

>> 

40 
■■4 

a 


a 
o 

1 

— 

3 

a 
o 

PL, 


O 




U 

03 
Oi 
>H 

V 

M 

■4» 

h 
O 

P=H 

















88 



P. D. 48 



55 

H 

a H 

H 

e* « 

O f- 

K 'J 



? 


rli 


o 


z 




■ o 




>-) 


CO 


<; 


■—1 


O 



53 
Ph S 

o 



CI -< t~ CO -* 1^ — ' 30 OJ X h- CN 

oooaso'.c'S'.coo 



00 



Q 
u 



—_ 25 :~_ i-J O — _ 5 OJ 7 IN OJ CO 

ci — * go © -*•' eo ti" o> d o* us -r 

CO CN CO 00 CJ >-0 t-» ^ ^ X O "^ 

o o © o cq ©_ c i x_ n -r t-- cn 

~r 1 / CO — " 0> CO* ~'. 5 1 © JO CO 
CO CO Ci T-; iNcNCOCNOOCOlNCO 



o 
5 

d 

o 
d 

oo 



T3 

C 

o 
O 



ft 

© 

CO 

o 



o 

« 

V. 



\ 

1 


f/J 


o 


lz 






iq 


-1 


d 


a 


1—4 


■4 




O 



s- . _ 

U 2. 

ft, a 
O 



SMCOJ. 00 CM 05 O^I'l- 
O "O CO "O O OXNNS'5 CO 



>> 

Q 

Fh 

11 

On 



oooooooooooo 
ooooogoooooo 

05 M OC iO O O 'O O >0 r- M N 

d d co" d t>^ d t^ d nS t^ d t-T 

CO »C 00 OS NNL-OOMMH 



O 
O 

co 

o 



z 

is 

o 

« 

a 

E* 

■4 





m 


o 


Z 


CO 


O 


CO 






a 




O 



oj 

M.tJ 

Oh « 

o 



OWNOHNiOi-lTtiM^M 
COCOCOCCr>-XC5XXXXX 



00 



cj 

Q 

0) 

Ph 



ogoooooooogo o 

ooooooooooog o 

rJ*CN CSCO-*OCN»0 XC5X© CO 

■* ONaoNMad'tNr'os d 

OJ t-~ O CN iO iO CO CO " X CN CO o 

^^^^x--^(Ncn ^cnco^ o 

?-< i— i i—i t— 1 1— i cn d oT d c<T oi a d 



Eh 

o 

O 

Pi 

•<! 

02 



O 

d 



CO 

O 

>-) 

O 



03 

Ph rj 

o 



TfO)ONMOMiOi-(W-35 



X 



Q 

M 

OJ 

Oh 



oooooocooooo 
ogoooooooooo 

r>- © CO l> CO r-H Tf CN Tf r-J_ rf iq 

dddddddd-fdd^ 

C;jCOCOC5COt>"-iOCOOOT}< 
lOiOtOOXOOOOOCOOiOiO 



o 
o 

00 

d 



o 

•<s> 

ft, 

ft- 

s 

ft 

C3 



C3> 



O 

02 





DO 


o 


z 


1— t 





CO 


-1 


C5 


^-4 




<: 




O 



Ph 0J 

o 



rfiOiOCO'^CO-^'OOOiO-<t l CO 
tOffl(0(0<0(OOiOifliOiOiO CO 



Q 



oooooooooooo o 

QOOOOOOOQOOQ O 

O CO uo CN CM X t> t^ i-0 l.0 CO »q O 

dddddddo"r^ddt^ d 

COOOMOIOONhmhON o 

iOCOCO'OOiO'OiOOl'JlOO lO 



OS 

o 

3 
« 



a 

« 
a 

s 
o 



o 

CO 


m 
Z 


<* 


o 




l-l 


d 


J 


o 


< 


»— » 


O 



Pi 03 

O 



Cli-tO'*CO'HO'*NNXO 
XXt-I>>t^XXl>-t^t>l>X 



X 



Q 

u 

o 
Ph 



oooooooooooo 
oooooooooooo 

CN 0_ X_ CN X CO Hi 00 iO_ 0_ CO O 

COJodcN^NO'tOMHrtO" 

HOCOHNHtOfflNHQOO 

CN O ^ i3< CO <-• O_C0 t^t* 00 »-i 
xxt~-t*t^xx"r^t^t>i>x" 



o 
o 

o 



OS 



a 

PS 
O 

(- 
o 



u 



.2 
a 

O 



K 
2 

o 



>> I. 

3 >r g-e >>oj 



o 

^2 






a^s 3 fe cs ci^ 1 



>i M 



?2o 2? S 



(1 

03 

a> 

t. 
O 



0.*^ 

CJ 



o ai 






P. D. 48 



89 



o 
o 
o 

© 
o 

<p 

02 

-^> 
Ph 



8 

o 

HO 

8 



O 
Si 



03 



<» 







eeanpjBjj 


eort<coc<9«DcO'*"cocoecMecco»-H»H»Heo^eoco^^eo^ 


1.4 


anuojuQ 


<-!00000000!DC0t>.t^^O5000005OC^iC-<+i5O«00000O05 
MCN|CQ(N(^lNJCCN<NCN|MC^INCN|fCCOCNJD«(NIN(NNC*3CNJ 






< 

M 

O 

a 
a 


o 

M 

o 

a 
p 

n 

< 


papnadeng 


n<00Tf<COO(N00tDNOXN00(»NT)<ONO'<J , (O0C:O 
CO^HCO'-HCN|iOfOr)HTtieNl<N^H'-HO<N'*CMi-HO'-<"-HCNT-irH 

oooooooooooooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooooooo 


CO 
(N 
O 

o 




paATOSBlQ 


O0000CNCDCMO00O^00Tt<Ttt«DOC^O(N«000-*TjHOO 

iOC0©O©C5©t^'-*00t>'O<-KD©a>©©t>-C000t-~Ci0C: 
>— i©©'-iO©0©'-h©00<— iO>- 'OQi-iOOOOOO 
0©©©©©0©©©©©0©0©©0©©©0©© 


o 

© 
o 
© 




l*V>X 


rt<CD<N00©<NCN|©i©CD00lNiO^'^<'*<"<f(N000000©00© 

oo©0'-i»H«*c<ic<i»o©c&i>-cNit»coroi-ii-it»oi05©©© 

hhhhhhhhhhOO h O hhhh OOO^O h 

©©©©©©©©©©©©cooo©©©©©©©© 


CO 

I— 1 

©_ 




TOJtf 


■*?OCN>C<IC)000(N00©©rt<'**00 , <*H©in©©©©00Cl(N'<*< 
■*'-<(N'*fO<N-*(N<N'-H»-iCO©©'-i©©»-*OlN'-iCO©© 

oooooooooooooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooooooo 


© 




Residue 
on Evapo- 

RATION 


nopraSj 
uo eeo^ 


lOKJiO'CO'OiOiO'OOOOiO'OO'OOOO'OOO'OO 
iOrOiOt^iO"«t<©COOOiCO'-Oi-Hi-li-liOiCOOt»'-IMC4CO-^ 






I«»oj, 


WO'OOOi'J'OOOUJOOiOiOOO'OOOiOWiOOO 
00t*00O00C000CNI»-<b.(NOl^J>(NOOiCe0l^c0O>OO 


© 

eo' 


COCOCO^<COCOCOCO^COCO , t l COCOCO^<^i<"*'<*<COCOCOCO , !t l 


m 
o 
8 

O 


43 

o 

w 


Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Distinctly vegetable. 
Distinctly vegetable. 
V. faintly vegetable. 
V. faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
V. faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
V. faintly vegetable. 
V. faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 
Faintly vegetable. 






* 

"3, 

"o 
O 


333333333 & ^3333333333333 

O3O3o3o3o303c3o3 c3 - — < < — i 0303o3p3c303p3C3o3O30303c8 

dj dj O ffl 1' Q) O t Cv>> rt o C I 1 0) O « l- Cv C 4J 0) li 3J 
MMMMMMMM 60 " -3 MMiMMMMMMbOMMMa 

ooavajoja'C'djjj^iDoociota'SjDaiiiajCOii 

j^i?.£x?x?x?x?x?x? > >2?^?^?^'^ > ^'i?^?^ > i?^?— ^? 

cflflBcccat! .si? caccoecacoacc 

vt-. u-< <*-. t_ w- *•-« **-« **-< m— ,2.2 •** **~" * 4H ** taH *** "**' *♦** < "*~ < *** **"" *** **"* *** 






w 
5 

55 

K 

g 

a 

Oh 
< 


^uaraipag 


XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XI XI 
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMUltiMMM 60 J 60 60 

co "go "02 uo'a3"a5"aS"a)*(i5'a)'co"3 m ao co "aj to in co co to ^<n cc 






^!P!q«»X 


XX XX XXXXX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 
606060606060606060 -6060606060606060606060606060 

McococncocoaGxccCicooDcocococccDcocococococDiO 






uoi^: 


>ano 


jo a^BQ 


^CiC^©CSCO5O©tf500COcN00N'CO00t»>-H»«©eN<Or^<-l 
i-Hi-HeNcN»-ccNcNrHcN^«-lCN 


< 





90 



P. D. 48 



© 
o 
o 

- 

o 
o 



Pi 

a> 
a 

02 

w 

(-1 

03 

PL, 



■Is 

© 

p 
•u 
ec 
CO 

^> 

p 



"to 

-si 



.8 






© 

■•■- 

© 

© 

© 

<to 



o 

w 

•J 
PQ 

H 



Bsaapjupi 



»l>.'t»'J")'H^ilC<5M(0 



•O 



auuojqQ 



COCOCNCOCOCOCOCSCOCNCNCN 



o 

CO 



z 
o 
a 
s 
< 



a o 

2£ 
o 



o 
o 
O 



a 
o 
Z 

W 
a. 



pspaadsng 



paAjossiQ 



I^oj, 



OOOOfflOXO'CNNf) 
hiOOCOC>1'^O h N ,hhh 
OOOOOOOOOOOO 

oooooooooooo 



«(0»000«NO'I | «N 
Tf^COO^CXMOCNOOCi 
i— i .— i o *- < ^^ O ,— ' ""■ * ^ O o o 

oooooooooooo 



tOOOltOMOCCH^OOO 

»-H»— lOHHHHHf- I i— I t-H i-H 

oooooooooooo 



ddi£ 



OOOOl"fOfflONtOOOO 
'-KNCOCOlM-rfO'OCOOCS'H 

oooooooooooo 
oooooooooooo 



nopiu3j 
uo eso'j 



I«V>j, 



ooliooooicoooo 



onoooooouooo 

C0CMOO^ H '*O00^i0'-'05 

'*COCO-*''i < 'f't l 'OM < COT)<CO 





rjC -; 




tC_£ 




"3 "2 « 




2 ^— 


*3 


o 


03 2, C3 


H 


• ?P*^ 




9" > M 




O ^ to 




3 >> > 








>>"£ >> 








^j.-. ^ 




a£ a 








03 • 03 




P*>fc 



a; a> 

^3 • 

i«H) o e« * c3 c3,2 

C3c3c3c3c3c3tjfihcc3 
M M M fc£ 61) bfl ►* ^ 6C 

>>>>>> J2.£> > 

2 2 2 2.S.S in "S.S 
'3 *3 '3 '3 '3 '3 -jj -r '3 



2 
3 

O 



^usmrpag 



^ipiqinj. 



n 
cC 

§33333333 ^ ^3 

.- 1 _j + 3 + j. ( _i.fi + 3. l j.tjnn-tJ 

.2 2.2 2 2 2.2.2 .2 ^- — .2 

oScScjoJoJrfoJcSoSgjjoS 

w ~J w J +3 *J .-> ~ w *3 

^3 ^3 _C J j3j3_Q ,Cri_3 
M M bJO M.J MMMJ M MM 

a: ccj m a: "JJ) » tc oq "2) an yj cc 



-U -tJ +i +3 


— 


-<J 


+3 


4-> 


-u 


-U +3 +J 


_l3.a.C_C 


.~* 


fl 




Xj 


X3 


J3 J3^3 


51 tL it it it it !'. it ii. it it it 






























OQ 02 03 tC 


00 


orj 


IU 


ai 


/. 


02 M SO 



>>>>>>>>>>>> 



uoi^oanoQ JO 8^BQ 



lONOO^COMCON^Nt' 



5£ 



air; 



> d 



: ^ »* t! ^> 2 &» 



» 



o 
o 






id 

o 
o 



m 



o 



> 



O 

o 
o 



Pi 

a 

CO 
Pi 

Ph 






^2 
o 

© 



o 
.p. 



C3 



«o 
© 

C3 
8 






© 



O 



d 

s 

Eh 



OONNtOi'MOMa'i' 


O 




»-H 


coco-^cococococococococo 


CO 







■~ C4 :o '.T ^h o -h o ^» •-" -f >-• 

oooooooooooo 
oooooooooooo 



o 

o 

o 



f MC'tC'/l'/jNOf tO 

^rj-r'io^i-^'-'SO-' 
oooooooooooo 



— 

o 



fflOOXt-fCONOXX 
0^-"/)I>'-<COCO-< , COM't l 'M 

oooooooooooo 



GO O O O <M. O 00 CO 00 O 00 CO 

ONoa^i-ioooHMO 
oooooooooooo 
oooooooooooo 



CN 

o 

o 



OiOOOOOOOOOOO I CO 
(SMOO^rtHMMOOM ' «0 



O O uo o o ^o o o >c o >o o 

OcCMO-Ni.lTfXaON 

■*Tt<coTr<-^cocO'tco-*T}<co 



— 
> 



g-a; 



uj a> 



-d+j_Q-^+3.c F o+ i 3.Q-o 

fl Si e5 ii, S, d c3 fe, oj d c3 



+3 

o 

a 



-5j si), os e- 



>>^ >,'5'5 >>>>c 2?^?i? 

"•-^^••-•^ -J *-'"3 *> *3 *3 

TicJc322.c3aflC 



en--- — .-. 



cj • o3 • -13 03 • c3 03 c3 



'- 



T3333333-QJ2J3X1 



i3c3c3o3c3o3=3o3o3o3c3 

O -»+3+3-4J+3-*J-^3+3-f3+3 +J 

»o)«s»saso»» 






G 2 2 2 2 2.2.2.2.2 
'3 '3 '3 '3 '3 '3 '3 '3 '3 'cs 



>>3 



d ^j 03 03 03 03 03 



£>»»»»» 



^3j3_2^3 j3^:j3 — J3J3J3 
"To "ot "S "3 yj"w "3 "3 "oc "51 02 aj 



*J+34-5*3+3+3+3 -hJ+3+3+3 

^3 X! .C j3 J ^3 J3 JUU3J2 

"3"3'3"3"3 in » C! cc aa co <n 
O . . . . 



a'^Q 3 u 



^S >>a)"S^ > 9 






o 



Tt< ^h CO «0 CO t» CN CN t~ rt* i-i CO <! 



P. D. 48 



91 



o 

© 

r— ( 

& 

m 

■+* 

e3 



.3 

<3 

S 
to 

o 
© 

© 



© 

HO 

© 






S 

© 

© 



6 



« 
< 







ssanDJBTj 


•-iocj>o>cot~o>o5cot~t».© 


00 




COCOcNCN<N<N<NeN<N<NeNCO 


<N 




0<00^»NONO»NO 


cN 


auIJOlqQ 


Q0O0O0t»COt>-00O0O0t^t~O0 


t^ 










N00O00N(0OON^N<0 


■* 








eo"5T"-<cococN<Nco^HcO'<ti 


CO 




Q 

M 

o 


papuadsng 


QOOOOQOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOOOO 


o 
o 




•^OOOOOOOOcNO-^O-^OO 


w 


■4 


z 

H 

s 




t»i-ieo , <*<'<i<i>o-'*<NTt<'-ieo 


rt* 


M 

z 


paAJOSSTQ 


1-4 »•* i— IHi-lp' (i— IHHHr- li— 1 

OOOOOOOOOOOO 


O 





b 








a 


n 
3 








a 
•3! 




COMCD!OOTflNOtCTXCOT)l 


t^ 




OCOt^COOOrHOOCOiOiO^OO 


t>- 






IB^ox 


CN »— t i— < i-H i— IflHHHl" l>— 1 1- 1 


1-X 






OOOOOOOOOOOO 


o 




MM»X<Nt)*Q0O*ON«) 


<N 






■*rJH05COiO'-HO<NOOiMCO 
OOOOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOOOO 


CO 




eaj^ 


8 






uoiq-iuSj 
xio 880^ 


ooo>oomooiniooo 


•* 


« o 

Q ^ O 


■^COt^CNiO'-'OCOCOCNCO'-i 


CO 
CM 


C«CNeNeNeNCNcN<N<-HiNcNcN 


« > f 










OOOWOOflOiO'OOO 


00 


Oh 55 « 


moj, 


Tt<Tj<iOCS00Ot^O00C0OO 


CO 







t^^t.coot-t^t>.<ococ3ir> 


t>. 














>>>>>>>» >>J3 >>>>>> 








j3J3j3J5ja 02 ,-d.d.d 








.+j +i -»j -U +a f* sT+i-tJ^i 
M h t« s- i< o! S'fHf-I, 














e3 S3 03 03 e3 a XI oj c3 c3 

OJOIOJOJOjH -£ © © 4) 














"0 "0 "^ "0 "d "0 sSTSTStS 








(acaflaflflajai^flflfl 






-^ 


03 03 o3 03 o3 ci^^S^ 03 c3 03 
bfl bfl bfl bfl bfl bfl J JS MMM 






o 






W 


©©©©©©"Sir©©© 
>>>»>Mbflbb>>> 

a a a a a arse's o a a 

oa m oo go cd go. *-.-«.— m m m 




« 

o 

Q 
O 




QQQQQQfofe^QQQ 






>>>>>»>>>>>> 






ja ja^a^s^: ,a 








^l+J+J^+j J) • 








I- U U U Ih i_ >>> 








03 03 03 ol 03 e3 j3 • • • 








table and e 
table and e 
table and e 
table and e 
table and e 
table and m 
getable. 
getable. 
g. and eart 
and earthy 
and earthy 
and earthy 


















2 
3 

O 






©©©©©a©©© • • • 








bfl bO bfl bfl bfl bfl > > > MbOM 








©©©©©*?, ^ ^ © © © 








>>>>>> >>>?>} > > > 








_^>_>>_^l_>» _>>_>! £j fl C3 ^> ^> ^> 














+i+3+i+i+i+j.-3 - 3'S-^'i>+J 








a d a a a a£££ a a a 
























fefeplHfefefe^-^^feplHfe 








^j+a -iJ+J +j+i+5 +j 








^3ja xw ja-c-a ja 








bO bD+j bo M+; bfi bfi bfi^ ^ bfl 




■ 


q.U9OTip9g 


"ot "3 "§)"«; "w 'yj'tO "53 "a! "yj'yj'co 










o 

« 

•< 

H 

Ph 




>>55>>5q>>>SS> 






^^J-tJ^I^+J^J+i+J^J+J-iJ 




a, 




j^j^jjxJ^jiTJ-: 




<J 




cXbObCbUbCbCblbCbJObCbObC 






A^rpiqjnj, 


00 OQ 00 OQ GO 00 "a3 00 CO 00*3 CO 






OCOOt»t*»OCX)^CN«OeCOO I 


UOTqL08|[OQ JO a^BQ 












< 



eo 
© 

eo 
© 

© 



P. 
© 

5^ 



© 



£ 



«© 

© 

.8 









o 

e3 



i-i<OOOOCO'^<'-<'-H'-lCO^<«0 


»o 






1-H 


Ot^"!f<l>-<fTf*O05<N00l>00 


(N 


COCOCOCOCOCOCOCNCOINCNIN 


CO 


• 




(©OOO0000O00-*C000(N 


CO 


CO<NCNCOeO<N-<fO— »0<NO 


CN 


OOOOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOOOO 


3 






OOOOOO^ifCOrttOOOOO 


CN 


HOOlOOaOOOOWOOCN 


Oi 


^QOOO-<-hOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOOOO 


CO 


o 






©OfOOCN^TfCOtOOO 


id 


^rtHHNM^ooaHQo 


1-t 


HHi- <t— (i-Ht-Hi-Hi-Hi-HO' — 'O 


rH 


OOOOOOOOOOOO 


o 






OOOOO-^CNOTttcOCOcNcN-* 


>o 


ONMNhcCNOOOhO 


rH 


OOOOOOOOOOOO 


o 


OOOOOOOOOOOO 


o 








OOiJiOiflOOOOCOO 


O0 


OiOiOOOOCOt^QO^OOOi-'CO 


CO 


oo^'Oin'O^O'O'OO'O 


00 


•^<CN»O?0'-tCNOCN^«0-*00 


I— ( 


^^^^^^■^■^CO^COCO 


r}H 


pleasant. 






a a> © © co 












oi 3 aJ-5 ©"2 ©"5 oJ^ 4J« 






— i«i^H 03 i — • 03 p— t 03^-^ 03 .-* — ^ 

+i « +j OC+j QD+j tJJ+i QS^i^s 














© .aj©a)©©©©©©© 






bOb0b(l>b0>bti>b0>b(lbO 






>>>_>>b.>.>>.> > >i>> 






>, >, >»"g >>-g >>-g >>-g >, >» 






+ J < J + )'-4J'3+J'3 4J'«+l4J 






a d fl«2 g^ g<3 flvS S a 












f3Hfap64>[l 1 >pM>-plH>'fefll 






3. 












©d©©©©£>©©©©© 












X5t3-OJ3-Q^J242J2Xl^!-Q 






Csdo3o3o3o3o3c3o3o3o3o3 






+a oj4J+i>+i+J+J+i+a+3+»+S 






©©©©©©©©©©© 






bCM)bCbCbObObOb£bi)bIlbCbjD 






ajm<u©aiajcu4)©a)a)© 






>>>>>>>>>>>> 












dddddddddddd 












O3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3oj 






>>>>>>>>>>>^ 






<J -J -u' -u -^ -J +i -J 






j2 J3 J3 J3-C^:J3J3 






bfi^ - • bfi.J bfi^i bfl bfl bfl bfl bfl 






aj saS^aS^SSS 






03 bfl9 a3 bfl tc bfl aicCQr - <n,n 










>w'Z>w>zn»>» 






^j+J +i*i+£+» HJ+i^j+j 






J3 J3 ^3 -Q -?„-d J3 43 ^3 j3 






bO bfl -bflbflbflu) .bflbflbflbfl 






•*4"1 4) .^5 1!2 ^3 13 © 13 13 li3 - J3 






moodoooooiooOoooooooo 










rPCOOa^b-t^tNl^^COCO 


> 




< 









92 

Table No. 15. 



P. D. 48 

-Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 1898-1926. 

[Parts per 100.000] 













Color 


Residue on 
Evaporation 


Ammonia' 


9 

C 

'E 

IS 
O 


(P 

.g 

3 
to 

C 

o 

O 

a 
o> 
M 
>> 

O 






T3 

315 
.SS 


"e3 
*-> 
O 

H 


Loss on 
Ignition 


0) 
0) 


ALBUMINOID 




Year 




H 


V 

> 

CO 

CO 

s 


o 

-o 
a 

CD 

a 

(O 


CO 

a> 

Oi 
3 

ft 

cS 


1898 


.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.44 


1.4 


1899 










.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.35 


1.1 


1900 










.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.38 


1.3 


1901 










.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.42 


1.7 


1902 










.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.40 


1.3 


1903 










.29* 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.39 


1.5 


1904 










.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.37 


1.5 


1905 










.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.35 


1.4 


1906 










.24 


3. 86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.36 


1.3 


1907 










.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.32 


1.3 


1908 










.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.26 


1.2 


1909 










.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.25 


1.3 


1910 










.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.22 


1.1 


1911 










.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.33 


1.4 


1912 










.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.29 


1.7 


1913 










.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.26 


1.5 


1914 










.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.25 


1.4 


1915 










.16 


3.73 


1.04 


.0015 


.0157 


.0134 


.0023 


.38 


.25 


1.4 


1916 










.18 


4.53 


1.85 


.0013 


.0133 


.0107 


.0026 


.36 


— 


1.4 


1917 








I 


.15 


4.45 


1.68 


.0015 


.0142 


.0124 


.0018 


.33 


— 


1.3 


1918 










.18 


3.89 


1.45 


.0019 


.0154 


.0128 


.0026 


.29 


— 


1.4 


1919 










.20 


4.28 


1.41 


.0010 


.0130 


.0108 


.0022 


.36 


— 


1.5 


1920 










.17 


4.23 


1.35 


.0012 


.0112 


.0097 


.0014 


.33 


— 


1.5 


1921 










.13 


3.80 


1.39 


.0006 


.0104 


.0089 


.0015 


.25 


— 


1.4 


1922 










.16 


3.98 


1.55 


.0011 


.0097 


.0080 


.0017 


.30 


— 


1.8 


1923 










.15 


3.90 


1.45 


.0011 


.0100 


.0090 


.0010 


.26 


— 


1.5 


1924 










.12 


4.10 


1.60 


.0011 


.0109 


.0084 


.0025 


.28 


— 


1.5 


1925 










.09 


3.98 


1.62 


.0013 


.0109 


.0093 


.0016 


.29 


— 


1.5 


1926 










.10 


4.18 


1.68 


.0015 


.0115 


.0092 


.0023 


.32 


•^™" 


1.5 



Table No. 16. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various 
Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 1898-1926. [Averages of Weekly 
Determinations] 

















Chestnut Hill Reservoir 


1 Southern Service Taps 


Year 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct 


Effluent 

Gate-house 

No. 2 


Low Service, 

180 Boylston 

Street 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place 


1898 


207 


145 


111 


96 




1899 














224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900 














248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901 














225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902 














203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903 














76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904 














347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905 














495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906 














231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907 














147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908 














162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909 














198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910 














216 


— i 


180 


178 


213 


1911 














205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912 














429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913 














123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914 














288 


— 


252 


174 


220 


1915 














163 


— 


128 


117 


134 


1916 














128 


— 


85 


102 


105 


1917 














178 


112 


119 


119 


141 


1918 














1,163 


168 


705 


317 


544 


1919 














92 


85 


100 


70 


84 


1920 














148 


86 


108 


113 


112 


1921 














103 


— 


83 


92 


92 


1922 














163 


— 


153 


160 


172 


1923 














229 


— 


178 


217 


230 


1924 














137 


— 


96 


150 


160 


1925 














144 


251 


120 


155 


174 


1926 














167 


~ 


118 


130 


137 



P. D. 48 



93 



«o 



s 



1 



SO 



! 

03 

I I 

»S GO 

O 

© 3 

*- a 

t? •«* 

!a & 



1 



I 



is 

i 

I 

« 

O 

a 



a <■> 

£ P5 
5 w 
CO 


(93IAJ3g 

qStjj) uo^eog 'ao^u 
uo^inqqey X »« d«X 


eooob-oooooi'fteO'^ccW'* 


CD 


((aoiAjag 
Moq) uo^sog '*89J»g 
uo^eiAog 081 » B dB X 


cooot~ooaoo»>ococococoTf< 


CO 


is 

a u 

S PS 

I 5 


(80! 

-Ajag q8iH) pjojpsjv 
P IB A pooMuaio %* dv Jj 


OCOOQOOOONH^HNM 

»Hi-l r-t.-ll-1rHi-li-t.-l 


o 


(801 

-a jag moi) piojpojv; 
'P JB A pooMuajo i« dux 


cooot^ooao©>co<NcococO'*f< 


CO 

I-t 


Fells 
Reser- 
voir 


asnoq-s^Q ^uongga 


00O0S05Q0OlN'-t'-t'-lM<N 


o 

l-t 


*9 

O fc 
04 o 


q^dap-ptpi 


OOONOONHHHrtM 


o 

F-4 


Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 


S*°N 
eBtioq-o^BQ loaning 


cot~t»ooooo»ococococOT)4 


CO 
1-t 


ftonpanby 
a^Bn^iqooQ) lapil 


1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 


1 


(^onpanby 
Ajnqpng) ^aiuj 


r-t»-lr-li-l<NCN'-li-l'-lr-lrHT-l 


1-1 


h 
< 

M H 

o 


niowog 


tJ<0> | TjtCOOOCO (OtOO 




q*dap-pipv 


tf500 1 MHOOS'-' COOSO 

r-l r-l NNNHN | HHH 




aoejjng 


f^tNCOCOrHCi-'fCNCOeOOCTi 

f-ICNICNCM'CNr-lr-li-lr-lr-lr-lr-l 


00 


Fram- 

INGHAM 

Reser- 
voir 
No. 3 


q^dap-pijAi 


r-tr-tCAKNCNC^i-li-lr-li-li-ll-l 


00 


Pi 

5 H 
Q in 

6 w 


januBqQ aado |o pug 


r-l r-l CO N rH 1— IHi- 1 .-1 rH r-l rH 


00 

1-1 


raowog 


QOCJOO'-l'-li-lTjIlOtfSTfllOlO 
r-li-4i-ICN|CNCNr-li-lr-lr-trHT-l 


1^ 


q^dap-ptj^ 


r-lr-lr-lC^C<IC > |i-l'-lr-li-l»-lr-l 


>-• 


aoujjng 


0000 00'-<O'-"OTtlTj<CCTjtiO 
r-lr-lr-ICNCN<Ni-li-li-lrHT-lr~l 


l^ 

rH 


£5 

w o 

(0 > 

p « 

i s 


jaAtg ja^QMUpg 


COCOCOCOtJICOINCNINCO^CO 


CO 
CO 


jaArg ^axodunmf) 


O>00©C0COC0O5t^Tt<t>.0000 


00 

■<1* 


98pug '%Q 13)630 JO^ 


COCO»OCO»Oi— :t^CN»OT*irHO> 
COC0C0C0t}ItJICNCN<NCN»O-* 


»o 

CO 


uicmog 


r-tC0C0rticO00COTji»/5»OTj«-<*i 


*4< 


q^dsp-pip^ 


<NCO>OTf*»flQ0lOT}tTftTj<TJ<Tl< 




soBjjng 


CJeOrfTjtkOOOrfCO-^^TjtTf* 


1-1 


1 

Is 
o 

• 






ij1i»s*llf!§ 


1 

s 



94 



eo 



*«■» 



!«■» -« 






eo 



(aoiAjag 
q8tjl) uoieog 'aoBig 
no^jnqqev I I* dra j. 



ocooco»o«oO'-"eoroiO'-< 

OOOOCJ^COCOCOCOOcNOCi 
COCOCOTmOCOt~t-»COCOiOCO 






(aoiAjag 
Aioq) uo^eog '^aaj^g 
uo^iA"og 081 W cIbj, 



CO<NiOCOascOcOCO»-ta0COCO 
t-t-t^cN'flNCNcNOOOC&OO 

cococo-^ocot^t^coco^co 



2 

m p 



(aoiAjag 

q»IH) Piojpaw 'pa^A 

pooAvuaiQ ^B dttj, 



cO-^^^iOOOcOCOOOCDCD 

000000<NCNOOOt~-0>C3O> 
COCOCO'*>OC01>l~CO»0 1 <*CO 



(aoiAjag Moq) 
pjojpajv 'piBA 
pooMaaiQ tb d«£ 



NtOtONTfHOONOOO 



a o o'p 

5 P H H W 
O H g 5 W 



uio^og 



O^OOOOCOiO t-aoco»o«o 
cocococo>oco t~otfiTt«co 



q^dap-pij\[ 



OOOCOOOOkOOOOiOiOOiO 

•*J<iOcOcO"*'-icN<-<COaiCOiO 
CCCOCCTj<iOcOt>.l>.0»OTfCO 



aoBjjng 



lO-^CiO 
CO CO CO CO 



I I 



MOOHMO 

<N cN t~ 00 CO t>^ 
t~ t- CD »0 -^ CO 



H L, J K « 

£ 5 3 w S 

W ^ffi W > 
O OS 



Z ON 
aenoq-8^BQ ^aanujg 



ao-^toocoi-cDt^^.>-icoco 

iOiOCO<NiO<NtN<-tt>-00t^»O 
COCOCO-<#iOCOt>t»COlO'<J<cO 



CO 

!, 5 ft 

go ■ 

fcn « 

PS 



2 

fib «IC 

El «S 



O 

o 



uiowog 



<©O5i-H0000<-liO-*Tj400C0O5 

iC^CO-*COCO<N(MiOCO«OCO 
COCOCOTtliOCOt"~t^COiO-^CO 



q»dap-pip\[ 



OCOtOtN<Ni-iiOt>.OcO<NT~i 



iOrt<Tj<<NC0C0iOCNt>-00iOiO 
COCOCO-^iOCOt^t^COiO-^CO 



aoejjng 



t>.COO>CO»OOOOC<lCNCOOOO 

■^CO^CNCOCOiOCOCOCOiOt}* 
COCOCO-*iOCDl-»t-COiOT^CO 






taua'BqQ aadQ jo pug; 



OOCOiOCCOiOiOOiOiOO 

lOCOiCOiOOOiMt-CO'^t^lO 
COCOCOCOiOiOCOCOCOlO-tfiCO 



P & £ "2 -< r W 



uiowog 



iOiOa>COiO»OOCOiOOOO 

lOTjHiOCOINOOOOOCOOt^CO 
COCOCOCO*OiOCOCOcOcO'<*CO 



qidap-pij^ 



OCOOOCOiOiOiOiOOOQOoO 

io*o»oc<jco>-<05i--icococo'2' 

COCOCOTj<iOtOcOt>CDiOrt<CO 



aoejjiig 



co co a> o> co co oo co *# o «h 



CO 



■^OS'O'-'COCNh-.OOt^TH 

eocoiocot~t-co»o-<*fco 



WO g H H h 

S & S 3 £ h 

w I h a « w 



£tf 






rao^og 



lOiOOO«00010iOiOCOOCOCO 

•*»OTj<OOt^<NiOTj<COOCOCO 
COCOCOCO-*iO»OiO»OCOrt<CO 



q^dap-ptp\[ 



00»OiO-<j<cOO«OiOO"OOCO 

coco^ior^-^exjcsaicoceco 

COCOCOCO'*>OCOiOiOiO'*cO 



aoBjjng 



C0tt>0Sr-l^-(O00>OTj<C000i-l 
COCOCOt»050005MiC?Ot-<0 

cocococo-<*<io<r>t>.co*OTj<co 



i 

o 

2 



00 



CO 






(N 



00 



1-4 

U0 



OS 



1-H 



CO 



iO 



iC 



CO 



»o 



00 



IN 



o 



d 



to 



(N 



* 
-* 



CO 







P. D. 48 



Lake 
Cochituate 1 

(Depth 

at Place of 

Observation 

62.0 Feet) 


mowog 


O00 COCOO(N(N b--«*iO 
t»t>. t-hiOiOcOcO iocooo 

COCO Tt(^i#-*-^ ^^Jtjyj 


o 

CO 


q^dap-pijM 


COCO 00«O00t>iO ONO 

COCO HONifiiO COOOls. 
COCO M*iOiO»OiO lO-^CO 


00 
CO 


aoBpng 


Ot^-*<©050iO«OOOcOO> 


00 


CCtiCHTtfCO-^COiOOOOOiO 
COCOCO'*>OCOt>t^CO'OTt<CO 





3 

o 



<B 
>» 

3 
ft 



as 
v 
be 

09 

> 



as 

-*» 
OS 

O, 

B 

■»* 

a 

o 
*> 
■*» 
o 

a 

eS 

a> 
i 

73 



oo 

a 
o 
•ft 

a) 

• — ■ 

a 

V 

<v 
-O 

>• 

3 

<x> 



0Q 

flj 

05 

u 

> 
03 

CD 

•h 

03 

<n 
0> 



03 
t- 
Ol 
O. 

a 

■»* 

V 

S3 
vti 

5 



P. D. 48 



95 



Op 



©0 

■I 

CO 

s 

•♦-J 

CO 

IS 

i— ^ 
<s 

§ 

£ "2 



eo 






8 -a 



o 



CD 

co 

r—< 

a 

p 



a 

8.8 

£ t! 



.s 



00 

If* 



§• 

•s- 

C3i 



CD 

W 

a 

o 



m 

w 
p. 
)-» 

Ph 

o 

« 
w 

w 



c* 



«s 



w 



NO 



00 



CN 



Q0 






OS 

o 






OJ"*COOOOt~COrHrH 
COOOlNHrtN 
cNeO^rH O 

t>T O rH 



coi-hcj 

ncqo 

COCO iO 
CN 





t 


tOH | | | | 1 


1 1 COrH | 




«a 


1,282 
25 


1,282 
25 




00 


OH 

OCN 1 1 1 1 1 

°i 

rH 


1,900 
21 




© 

rH 


COCNrHCO 

ION 

00 III 

CO 


OJCNrH 
lOCN 

1 1 oo 

CO 





COt*©tJ<10 ^ (0 030 

t-»CNrHC0 CJJ rHCNrH 

CNrH O I 00 I I •"* rH 

OJ rH OJ 

CN CN 



COrH | | | | 

CN 



I I 



C0 H | 
CN ' 



o o oo rH oo co oj 

NOMO CN 

T*rH OJ I 

^* rH 



W.H 



r* co co t}< cn eo tj< rH 
ococooo eo 
O eo I 

8 ^ 



co*<° 

i 



CO t^ CO t>- rH CN O 
iOcO»OcN y-* 

© I I 

CO 

o> 



co 

o 

CO* 
O) 



00 I© 

COiO 



OcOTfOHiON 
CN-#CNC0 CO 

iq CO I 

»o 



W|>05 
CO 

»o 



CNrH|>COrH t^. -HON 

rH CO T}< CO h.©Tf 

t» I I I t^ 

CO CO 

CO CO 



CO <d«00 CN -H« 

CO O «> 

l> I >Ol III CN I 

<* CN «> 



CO 



b-COlO 

00 

00 I I I I I I 

CO 



t»eo»o 

oo 

oo 

CO 



OrHIC OHIO 

00 I I I I I I 00 

OJ OS 



t*i>t~© 

COiOCN-* 
»q rH | 

lO~ 

r-t 
CN 



lO 



I I 



CNt^t- 

COiCCN 

r-i 
CN 



oi oo a> 

CO co 

"5 1 I I I I I I >0 I 



00 



COCN00-* CN NNO 

rHrHOCN CO rH rH 

>0 rHOO I I I I CO rH 

O rJ 

00 00 



e 
op 

Q 

T3 
Cp 

*a 
oJ 
m 
cp 

ft 
o 

a 

OS © 

a^ S 

g -*> «> 

P <u a 

o u 2 



CO 

•CN 

OJ 

rH 

. 60 

a 
C 

p 

•13 



a> 



CN 



CO 

ci 






4,05 oJ 
^rH ^ 

'3rH''» 



<p'3 a 

3 ►« " 
co u a 

--o g 

cy coj* 

-3^> 

> 00 4) 

33o 



OS 




T3 






'T-t 


* 




* 


• 


M 




03 






(3 




C 






•** 




<s 






• »- 


* 


* a ' 


• 


• 


P 




O 






TJ 


0) 




CD 




JJ-TJ 


a 


13 


a 


CP 


9| 


CO 


CO 


01 


oo C3 

.2 fl 


CI 


oo no 


a 


CO 


m 

m 


9 fl-S 


CO 


d 


c4 
co xi 

> * 


> 


Cr *> 

K F 1) 

Q> O^J 
> 


> 


CD 

> 


Air val 

Length 


Gate v 

Air val 

Length 

1926 


> 

S 
S3 

o 


CO 
> 

3 






CN 

o. 



CP 
CP 



T3 
CP 
M 
CP 

> 
o 



-^ CP 
CP CP 

o CO 

9 o 

OS 
ojcO 

_• ««H 

^3 O 
CP , 

.a cp 

r? CP 



o! t^. 

.9 § 

CO CP 



■*» CP 
CP CP 
CP+i 

«*-! QQ 

cOtj 

CO cp 

CO »- 

CP 

^> 

CP o 

a « 

+- a> 
C 

CP CP 

a a 

CO ej 
CD W 

2o 

fl CO 

cfe © 
I* 

a^ 

OiO 
Ooo 

A .. 

CP CP 

a a 

ti ft 
^a 
*o2 

s s 

H-. 03 

iO° 
O cp 

73 r- 

P 

a 



CP 

ft 



a 
o 



CO 

03 
CP 

s 

a 

CP 



?j a 



^» 
CP 
CP 

•*-! 

CO 
rH 
CN 



T3 

a 

c3 
cp 
ft 



a 
o 

H 

trl 
J. 
r4 
M 

a 
o 

S... 

-3 cp ep ep 

a ftftft 

CP ftftft 

o 9 g S 
§2 22 



3 co co co 
w o3 c3 03 

cp-Ot-to 

a cp cp cp 

•j a a a 
'ppp 
s • " i 

03 +J +a •»» 

t fl a a 

g CP CP CP 

aaaa 

M Cp Cp Cp 
i«H CP CP CP 

OlHlH<H 

4, o o o 

CP -*3 43 +3 

«J CP OP OP 

CP OP OP 

gSj <H •»-" "«H 

rHOJkOt^ 
»OrHOSCN . 

^eot-co g 

^r m iv m irM 
ft a) CO 00 00 

• g op cp cp op 
** O T3 "O T3 oo 
rjJ^P^P^^CN 

cp "o "cp "3 "« CO 

fit a a a a-* 

Nfl f me i> 



1 



CD 

(-i 
03 

CQ 

CP 

P. 

• rH 

P. 
r=3 
<5 



op 

•»*H 
■>-H 

•S 

v. 



oq 



8 

co 

r&2 



e 

rx> 



to 

C3s 



O 
O 



PQ 

< 



O 



COCNlOOOOrHOOOS 
OlrHCO CO 05 rH 
■^ CO 00 CN CO 

t^ 00 



CJcOOSCOOOrHOOO 
COrft^ ■*■* 

»0 eo 



lOOOlOrHO OO) 
C0050 t-I I COO) 
O rH rH 



00 



"pttCOCO HCN 

t <N II f-rH 

iO iO o 



COCN-^ 



OCN 

CN 

CN 



tN 



•^TftOO 
CO rHOO 
OSrH | 

CO 



CM 



0-* 

OJrH 
I OSrH 

CO 



OCO CO rH 

eo ^ ^ 
iq l 

CO 



CO-«*t 

I «o 

CO 



CN 



CN CN 

Oi I I I I I OJ I 
<N CN 



CN 



CN 

CO 



I I I I 



eo 



op 
op 



CN 

OJ 



s 



T3 

a 

49 



CP 

a 



CN 

C5 



co 

CP 

CU 

Q 

CP 

CO 

p 



CO 
CP 

1 

CO 



CO 

CP 
OP 

Q 

op 

CO 

p 

M 
2 r. 

Si's 

bo -a ^3 

a a * a"* a a a 

™" on*a co»a oa'^ oo 
—• cp •*-■ "' 

oJ > ti 



a 
cp o op a cp 

a^a"* a 



^^. a 

jO 03 op 



OP -JJ, OP^ OP 



ai 00 33 o3 O 03 
H>r5r>HH>H>- 



96 



8*a 



CO 



<N 



0> 






c« 



GO 



O 

«N 



<s 



o 

CO 



CO 



GO 
CO 



O 



CN 



CO 






CNCN00-«*<C©CNiOO5G0t>>CN00'HQ0t>.00O5»OOG , 5 00 
CO*OkC^CC»C*"CC35CO«iCTt<QOX<N(MGOo3COCO 




t-COCNOO'OCNCNCNiOTfCOCOi-HOSaOCOkO'-i.-ICN'-H 



COt- OI b- r-OO'-'i-HCNt^oOO'.iCO-'f-'i't-'-'CNOl 

•^oocco ■>* o> oi O co as oo co tj« oo t~- o oo in <n *h 
in io cod^o"dcdco*t>*cNdt>*'-*o* ododco 



CNr^'<*COCNt>-'OCOOOC00005CN''t l 05CNiOOOOt^Oi 
00O5©CNcOi-iTi<cOCOCO00r~O5'«i<t>-CNCOi-HCNCOt^ 
CN t^O 00 O CO *N®qOi| i NHr.N»®HN* 

h ■«* co" od Tf oo" o co* co* od Tf io t-* tj* co i-T ■<* co" go co r>* 

i-icOCNiOTticOcOCOi-i^OCOI>CN-*'-i'-iOiO'Ci 

NHHfJrtHHflNHN lO^lHNHHH 



I I I I I I I I I 



I I IAI I I I I 

05 



0»0'-H.-H,-HCSCN©t^-'OI>t-CO'<*lCCO>0500'<*cO 

OOOS«OOOOtir»NHO(BO)NN<DHHMOH 

qNqqqooN*oo*Nqq^*NNH©qco 

i-J l>* CN »0 O* CN t>" CD O* CO t-* i-h CO f-J i-H ©* CO »C co" CN co" 
tH i* iO 00 CO CN CO O <-H CN t>- t>»05TfrH T}t TjH 

OJ i-H r-t i-Hi-H i-H 



05C0C000^**'-HiOi-tTtiOC0Tt<O0iO>CO'-ti0C0C0a0 
i0i-Hi*C005C0iO'-H-^00ON'005C0^>Ot^O' , <*<05 

oo co oi iq ^hcn o_ "qoi oi o >o ooo(ohhoh 

CO*WCO*Tj*CNO*^OCNCNdH?i-*t>*,-Hdt>* dt-*-<i" 
CO CN •<}< t>. ■** t* CO •>** CN CN ft t^COCO CN CN CN 




dcOO5i/5HiO0005d05C0^^tf£^O*'<i"o*CO"cO*Ti< 
otcn .-? co oo co cm <m aiNMn 



CNCO 



s 



CO <-*0 00 

CN *N Ol 

I I CO© I o> 

io*co* tfj 



00 00 ■<*■<* Tf 
h 05 <N ■<* ri* 



00 IO 



. (CN 

CNCO 



ii ▼— > wj ^ t tp uu uj t>i ^w 

15 I Hiqq_ ■* I I t^OS I l>CN I 

5 r-ToTco" o" »oi-* co*>-* 

H T-4 H 



eo i 

CO" 



Ot^-COOO i-iUJcoiO OCOOCN t-i 

i-HiOt^rt* 05t>(N>-H NMCO 05 

HO^O) I OONNtJI I OH«OC I I05l 



OCO>OcO 
00 CN 
CN 



00 CO iO CO 



COCNOOO 
CO<-t 



CN 



I I I I I t I I I I I I I I I I co I I I I 

CO 



IO 



OCN 

(Nffi 



o 
o 



CO 



HO 

oo 35 



l> 



CO I I OCN I 05 I I CO I I I lO-tf I iO I I I I 



CN 

o 



cot^ 

00 CN 



CN 



05 10 
COH 



»o 



CO Tj< f» T}1 f-H 

h- HO 00 00 

O I I ^O I t)< I I I I I I 05 I I I I I I 

CO* -*o" CN 

05 OOrH 



CO 2 

^ I I 00 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

iO "" 



^ I I CO I I I I I I I I 

~Z co" 

GO _h 

co ^ 



I I I I I I 



CN 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



^ r-l 

00 I I O I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

co" CO* 



° CO 

oo I I o> I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

O* «5 



CN t* 

CO 00 

•q I I t» I I I I 

»o" t>* 

rH t-H 

CN 



I I I I I I I I I I I I 



CO 

iO I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I I I I I 



CO I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I l I I 

00 





00 


o S 
w S 




*i 


o « 


t« o 


♦3 A 


n 


0( > 



CN 

CO 

rH 

^1 
CN 



CO 

o 

CO_ 

t~* 

>o 

CN 



•TOO 

co • 

co*^ 
oo£ 
cO 



CO 00 
05 00 

C5^ 



c- 



©H 
03 d 



HO 
i-H rH 

°icN 

iO i— i 



CN 



CNO0 
COCN 
OS 



CO 



rqo 



Oi 



o*^ 



OS<N 
t,CO 
CO • 



rHOO 
«■* 
O • 

oo^ 1 



CNOi 
CO-* 
l> • 



cOO 
CO • 

o 



9° 

lO H 

CO • 
CN 



oi r* 

IO 1-H 
05 



CNCO 

co»o 

CO • 



rHCO 
^ld 

f-CN 

O 



TT GO 
t>.CO 
CN • 



00 iO 
COCO 
05 • 

CN* - * 
CN 



O00 

O5 00 

t^ • 

CN 



CO Oi 
HHrH 
CO ' 

n'S 
co^ 

CN 



O5C0 
COCO 



CO T}< 

CO • 
fT«5 




P. D. 48 



P. D. 48 97 

Table No. 22. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services Metered, Fire 
Services and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and Towns in the Metropolitan 
Water District December 31, 1926 





■ 






Services 










Per Cent 


Used for 




City or Town 


Services 


Meters 


of Services 


Fire 


Fire 








Metered 


Purposes 
Only 


Hydrants 


Arlington 


5,410 


5,410 


100.00 


1 23 


671 


Belmont 












3,463 


3,463 


100.00 


8 


386 


Boston . 












94,467 


91,594 


96.96 


2,883 


11,306 


Chelsea . 












5,617 


5,612 


99.91 «■ 


120 


425 


Everett . 












6,792 


6,403 


94.27 


45 


583 


Lexington 












2,065 


2,058 


99.66 


8 


307 


Maiden . 












8,946 


8,914 


99.64 


70 


669 


Medford 












8,863 


8,863 


100.00 


23 


869 


Melrose . 












5,166 


5,166 


100.00 


22 


419 


Milton . 












3,373 


3,373 


100.00 


3 


515 


Nahant . 












845 


680 


80.47: 


2 


121 


Quincy . 












14,650 


13,719 


93.65 


27 


1,542 


Revere . 












5,959 


5,283 


88.66 


•7 


370 


Somerville 












13,732 


13,732 


100.00 


. 71 


1,322 


Stoneham 












2,017 


2,017 


100.00 


4 


171 


Swampscott 












2,406 


2,406 


100.00 


8 


254 


Watertown 












5,177 


5,177 


100.00 


35 


543 


Winthrop 












3,389 


3,389 


100.00 


5 


354 


Dist. Supplied 


192,337 


187,259 


97.36 


3,364 


20,827 


Brookline 










7,031 


7,031 


100.00 


28 


857 


Newton . 










12,074 


12,013 


99.49 


62 


1,280 


Total Distr 


ict 










211,442 


206,303 


97.57 


3,454 


22,964 



98 



j^> 



s 


QO 




©J 


g<= 


© 


>-( 


•»~> 






<3> 


oq 






J- 




3 

■^3 


rO 


CO 


e^ 




is 




fe 


&H 


fc 




■w> 


c 


G 


•«* 


^ 


<» 




.s 




3 




<» 




^ 





4 



4 



H 



CO 

n 
o 

M 

w 

« 

w 



o 

CO 



H 

u 

& 

w 

CO 

o 



« (1 



55 if fc 

S 5 9 b 

a «Sg 

H H P 5! 

■< H E ■ 

► J8 



ig 



w 
i- 

•< g 

a o 
►a w 

a « 

o 
o 






,H 



2 CO 

Q « a 

3 O H 

5 i B 

s p o 



w « 
a •< 
~ « 
a 



H « 



a 



Q H i-i 
a* CO O 

iss 

A «• W 

s 5 § 

s « I 



a 
-So 



o o 2 w 
s w ? 3 

^ O W 



1 O 

W 



g 



CO W 

O Z 

«S 
g 

a 



uinuiiuiiY 



CO'COi'^'^tNO'^'COOCSS'-i 
00t^cOI>-t>-cOcOr^r>.t-«.<Ot^ 



ranuiixBp^ 



uinuiraij^ 



rananx'ep^ 



mnunmp^ 



ranraixrap^ 



tnntnniij\[ 



T»<cOCO©eNCOr-CNCNt>-'-iO> 



ainuiix'B]^ 



(ONCOiONOifliNOOOO 



ranuiraip^ 



OOOOCOCOCNOOcOCNOCO-^CN 



ranunxep\[ 



t>.t~cot~-cor^coco-<$<©coco 

COcOcOcOcOcOcOcOCOCOcOcO 



ranaiiaij\[ 



ooiococoi-it^cocococococo 



ranraix'BjY 



CNcoco^mcocoio^cocor- 
t>cocot-cococococor>-i>co 



mnuirnij^; 



cOCOiOcOkOcOCOCOcOcOiOCO 



umuiix'BpY 






mnmraij^ 



aocoooco»-iooco-<*<coTf<^co 

t»t>-t^.cOcOcOCOCOCOCOCOCO 



mmmx'Bp^ 



OOS-*OcN'<*ai-*COCOC005 
OiGOO0O5G000t^GCGOGO00r-~ 



ummimpv 



COCOCOCOTt<-*T*<TtHTj<Tf<CNCO 



amaiix'Bj^ 



CO©r»COt~CO00mcO>OCOt-» 






u 09 



U 

QJ 






illllillllll 



P. D. 48 






CO r-4 GO CO 00 »0 CN Tf< ^< f-( -^ N. 00 

HooiHn-fioiootooo co 

CN CN ^h CN (N <N CN CN CN CN <N CN CM 



CDOONMNNNiOSNN GO 

r-i(N»-<>-<OOOt~-COCOCOCOCO 

(N CN <N M CN »H tr-i (N CN CS CN (N CN 



i-H »-l i-l i-t i-^ i— I tJ< ^ Tj< t>. (>• t>- GO 
CN (N CN CN CN CN CN CN <N CN CM <N CN 



hhhnhhOONNOO O 
CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN —i <-« CN CN CN 
CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN 



GO GO GO GO 00 GO GO CO lO GO GO 00 CO 

^4* ^^^ ^T^ ^5^ ^P ^ff ^^^ ^T^ w 1 ' s^ ^7^ ^7^ ^i^ 

CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN 



CN 

«o 



CO 



CO 






CO 



CO 






CO 



00 



CO 



Ifi 

iO 



CQ 

a> 

M 

CO 



P. D. 48 



a 
o 

U 






S 



O 

© 
<3 






Si 

I 



'43 

I 

I— — 

fiq 
I 

• 
CO 

• 

O 



< 






O H 



a 
o 

> 

w 
m 

w 
o 

M 

W 

z 

« 

w 

tf 
O 



0) 

o 
O 



w 
u 

1-» 
> 

a 
a 

02 

w 
o 



z 
« 
a 
H 
H 
P 
O 
02 



03 

O ^ W H 

S w p B 

ZyWS 

•- 1 « o r 
*£■«>; 

W O 1° "* 



3S 



s 



* ^ * 

° 2 5 h 

W W S a 

^ £ W H 



a z 

55 O 



a 
« 



a 
H 

a r o 

> « w 

W g ffi 

PS H 



< 



H M 

" O 



o 

« a 

a <» 



00 

W 
05 

* 2 e< 

£ « K 
P a « 



« 
w 

00 te !h 

P j p 
a j a 

H 



OS 2 

w a 

« ■< 

o £ * a 
dgwg 



CD 



rancaraijY 



^©^©cMt^o^co^gs-* 

HHHOOtOtOOOOOH 



uinintx'Bp^ 



innaiiaip\[ 






ranuipcepyj 



umumnj^ 



tunuiixBj^ 



uinunuip^ 



umtmxrap\[ 



uinunuij^ 



rantnixBp\[ 



uinuiratj^ 



umunxBj^ 



uinairaij\[ 



umunxraj^ 



mnuiiaip^ 



uinuiix , Bp\[ 



raninmipY 



ranraixBj^ 



t 1 




- s 8 a 5 

Ilia 



99 



o 



r*< rf< (N Tf< rf Oi O rf< O <N •* rf» CO 

eo co co co co co eo co co co m eo co 

^Ji Tji ^J' ^Jl ^j' ^5^ ^T" ^5^ ^T ^T" ^T ^j^ ^J* 






»— 103'— ''-•OS'- < >- IHHHrtH 

oooooooooooo o 

<M •-• Ol (N rH CM CM CM (N (N (N <M CM 



Tt< O CO i-l lO O OS CO 00 00 i-l © m 

<NTf<COCOi-lOOCOOO'-'COCO 

CM CM CM CM CM i-t i-< CM <N CM CM CM <N 



CO CO CO CO t- b- rf< CM rj* i-H CO i« O 
<0 CD CO CO »0 id iO iO iO CO CD CO CO 
CM CM CM CM CM CN CM CM CM CM CM CM CM 



OS t» Tf» CO iO CD CO CO i-< CM 00 i-H CO 
CO tJ< ■* t* CO i-H i-H i-H CM CO I* rj< CO 
CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM <M CM CM 



lONOiOiOOOOiOCftNt'N CO 
CO CD cO CO CO CO iO iO iO CO CO CO cO 
CMCMCMCM(N<M(M(MCMCM(M(M CM 



ONOONMHHHH00IN t- 
CO CO CD CO CO iO iO iO iO iO iO CO iO 
CM CM CM <N CM (N CM CM CM CM OJ CM <N 



OS OS 00 OS OS OS OS t^ t» b- OS 00 00 
CO cO CO CO CO CO CO CD CO CO CO CD CO 
CM CM (M CM CM <N iM CM IM CM CM CM CM 



co co ■* co co t- co r^ oo Ni co os -^ 

rt* -^ 1/5 CO CM CO CO Tf< i# -«ti iT5 iC tJ< 
CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM 



00 00 00 00 00 00 00 CO CO CO t~ h- t~ 
cOcOcOcOcDcDcOcOcOcOcOcO CD 
CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM 



00 00 00 CD CM 00 i-l i/5 CM CM O "5 O 
OSCSOSCSOSCOCOt-CSOO© OS 
Hi-IHHHHHHHIN(NM 



CO 
CM 

OS 



CO 



► 
o 

0) 

d 
o 

a 

jQ 
c8 

a 
o 



09 
9) 

OS 

O 



OS "5 00 OS t- 1>» t>- OS OS OS CM CM OS 
CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO •* Tf CO 
CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM 



lOiOCOCO ©CM*HOCOCOOOO © 

CMCMCMCMCMi-ti-HCMi-li-ii-iCM 

CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM 



CM CM CM CM CM i-H i-l i-l i-H i-H CM CM CM 

^9* ^J* ^J* ^^ ^T* ^^ ^7^ ^^ ^r ^T ^^ ^^ ^T 

CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM 



t»l~"b»b"i-<Tf^i-i©©i-( 

CM CM CM CM CM —I ^ CM i-l i-< CM I CM 

CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM 



oo t^ t~ oo oo m &• © t- oo ■* t^ 

^^ ^* ^* ^T ^^ ^^ ^^ ^* ^^ ^^ ^* I ^* 

CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM CM « CM 



09 

ot 

u 

0) 

«< 



100 



Appendix No. 4 



P. D. 48 



Contracts made and pending during 

Contracts relating to the 



Number 

of 
Contract 



19 



21 



22 



23 



24 



2 

WORK 



Section 78, Mill Brook Val- 
ley Sewer, North Metro- 
politan System, in Med- 
ford and Arlington. 

Section 79, Mill Brook Val- 
ley Sewer, North Metro- 
politan System, in Arling- 
ton. 

Removal of portion of exist- 
ing wharf, dredging of 
basin, and construction of 
a new portion of wharf at 
Deer Island, Boston Har- 
bor. 



Section 80, Mill Brook Val- 
ley Sewer, North Metro- 
politan System, in Arling- 
ton. 



Section 81, Belmont Relief 
Sewer, North Metropolitan 
System, in Cambridge and 
Belmont. 



Number 

of 

Bids 



10 



11 



Amount of Bid 



Next to 
Lowest 



115,790 00 



47,621 00 



12,615 50 



32,915 00 



63,537 00 



Lowest 



110,235 00 1 



43,265 00' 



11,654 00 1 



29,575 OQi 



63,491 50 1 



Contractor 



Anthony Baruffaldi 
Co., Somerville. 



Antony Cefalo, West 
Roxbury. 



Rendle Corporation, 
Chelsea. 



Antony Cefalo.Weet 
Roxbury. 



J. H. Ferguson Co., 
Providence, R. I., 



1 Contract based upon this bid. 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 4 



101 



the Year 1926 — Sewerage Division 

North Metropolitan System 



Date of Con- 
tract 



April 16, 1925 



Dec. 3, 1925 



June 24, 1926 



Aug. 23, 1926 



Dec. 30, 1926 



8 

Date of 
Completion 
of Work 



April 30, 1926 



Aug. 11. 1926 



Nov. 1, 1926 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts made 
in 1926 



For removing existing structure, pulling and cut- 
ting off pipes, dredging basin and removal of 
dredged material, $4,200 lump sum; for furnish- 
ing and driving oak piles, $0.75 per lin. ft.; for 
furnishing and placing Georgia pine caps, fir 
flooring, oak walings, etc., including material 
and labor for coating structure with wood pre- 
servative and making of connection between ex- 
isting bridge and new wharf, $148 per M.A.B. 
M. in place. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench and lay- 
ing of pipe for 20-inch and 24-inch Akron pipe and 
24-inch cast-iron] pipe main sewer, $6.00 per lin. 
ft.; for earth excavation and refilling in trench 
and laying of pipe for 12-inch Akron pipe relief 
sewer, $2.00 per lin. ft. ; for Portland cement brick 
masonry in manholes and special structures, 
$35.00 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete 
masonry in trench and special structures, $10.00 
per cu. yd.; for Portland cement boulder con- 
crete masonry in trench, $1.00 per cu. yd.; for 
bank gravel refill around pipe in trench, $1.00 
per cu. yd.; for rock excavation in trench, $6.00 
per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench and 
embankment for 30-inch concrete sewer and 16- 
inch and 30-inch cast-iron pipe sewer, $7.10 per 
lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick masonry in 
manholes and special structures, $34.70 per cu. 
yd. ; for Portland cement concrete masonry in 
trench and special structures, $12.75 per cu. yd.; 
for Portland cement boulder concrete masonry 
in trench, $12.75 per^u. yd.; for spruce piles in 
trench in place, $0.65 per lin. ft. ; for rock excava- 
tion in trench, $5.00 per cu. yd. 



10 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1926 



$114,893 63 



46,124 57 



10,993 87 



22,693 00 



2 Contract completed. 



CONT: 1CTS MADE AND PENDING DURING THE YEAR 1926 — SEWERAGE DIVISION 

— Concluded 



if 



Summary of Contracts 



North Metropolitan System, 5 Contracts. 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1926 



$194,705.07 




THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



of i hi: 



CITY OF 



TON 



' •■ K v 



i ZZ ; t Z . fc.2> • 10II. .- ■•'-.■'' 





88$ 



*«{*, 



•'-.■■-, 

'.■:*•■